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Jiemmiam 



ANTHONY CAPUANO 
MICHAEL CELATA, SR. 
HANNAH GIDDINGS 
MARIE L. HARDING 
RICHARD D. HOWLETT 
DENNIS F. KLEINSASSER 
MARIA J. MAURIELLO 
EDITH MICHELSON 
ROBERT P. PALMER, JR. 
THOMAS W. ROBBINS 
AUSTIN LINCOLN ROUNDS 
STANLEY E. SMITH 
WILBUR SPANKS 
GEORGE VELOZA 
JOHN M. WALSH 
LCPL STEVEN M. WEST 
MARJORIE WINCHELL 
RAFFAELA ZACCAGNINI 




{front cover) 



Wilmington Town Common 

Photo by Wilmington resident Richard Searfoss 



Table of Contents 

Title Page 

Mission Statement 1 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Town Manager 4 

Administration & Finance Town Clerk 8 

Board of Registrars 9 

Town Counsel 9 

Board of Assessors 13 

Town Treasurer/Collector 14 

Town Accountant 15 

Public Safety Fire Department 36 

Police Department 39 

Animal Control Officer 42 

Facilities & Infrastructure Public Buildings Department 43 

Permanent Building Committee 44 

Department of Public Works 44 

Water and Sewer Department 48 

Human Services & Consumer Affairs Library 50 

Wilmington Arts Council 55 

Carter Lecture Fund Committee 56 

Historical Commission 57 

Recreation Department 62 

Elderly Services Department 66 

Housing Authority 71 

Disabilities, Commission on 72 

Veterans' Services 73 

Board of Health 75 

Cable T. V. Advisory Task Force 78 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 78 

Education Wilmington Public Schools 79 

Shawsheen Valley Reg. Voc. Tech. H. S 102 

Community Development Planning/Conservation Department Ill 

Housing Partnership 115 

MetropoUtan Area Planning Council 115 

Middlesex Canal Commission 116 

Inspector of Buildings 1 18 

Board of Appeals 119 

Town Meetings & Elections Constable 126 

Presidential Primary - February 4, 2008 126 

Annual Town Election - April 26, 2008 129 

Annual Town Meeting - May 3, 2008 130 

State Primary - September 16, 2008 157 

State Election - November 4, 2008 159 

Directory of Officials 162 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 163 

Officers and Department Heads 167 

Municipal Services Guide 168 

Meeting Dates and Times 172 

Accepted Streets 173 

Telephone Directory by Department 




The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 

"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in order to 
dehver a wide range of municipal services to those who Hve, work or own 
property within the borders of Wilmington; and in order to make this 
community a good place to live, to work, and to raise and educate a family, 
those services must be responsive to the needs of the people. They must be 
effective and efficient. Principles of honesty, fairness, dependabiUty and 
compassion must govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the 
Town. Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most important resource 
and the key to its success in serving the people of Wilmington." 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



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Office of the 
Board of Selectmen 
(978)658-3311 



Town of Wilmington 

121 Glen Road 
Wilmington, MA 01887-3597 



FAX (978) 658-3334 
TTY (978)694-1417 



Deeir Fellow Resident: 

As the vast majority of cities and towns struggled to balance the budget and avoid wholesale layoffs, 
the Town of Wilmington continued to flourish throughout the calendar year 2008. With the support 
and guidance of the Town Manager, Finance Committee and countless administrative personnel, 
along with the unparalleled commitment of thousands of volunteers, the Board of Selectmen has 
continued to support regional and local zoning and planning initiatives, address environmental 
concerns, recognize its men and women in uniform and enhance the Town's roads, playgrounds and 
pubhc works. 

With respect to planning and land use, members of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting voted 
overwhelmingly to support the Board of Selectmen's efforts to reconstitute our Board of Appeals, 
increasing the number of permanent voting members from three to five. Town Meeting members 
likewise supported a measure to enable expedited permitting of important economic developments 
proposed along Route 1-93. This long-term planning initiative has positioned the Town to receive 
priority development site funds of $100,000, and the project is essential to the overall success of the 
Tri-Town Development Interchange Project, which most agree is the flagship of regional planning 
efforts in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Finally, the Board of Selectmen supported a local 
zoning by-law that since its passage in 2008 serves to prohibit "big box" developments in most areas 
of town, but promotes such important tax generating development in the more appropriate locations 
along Route 93. 

As was the case in 2007, the Board of Selectmen again was successful in executing a fixed fee 
agreement for services with the office of Town Counsel, as well as with professional, technical and 
environmental experts. This arrangement has consistently enabled the Town to accurately and 
adequately budget for legal and consultant fees, to avoid litigation by facilitating the town's access to 
preventative legal advice and to avoid fee and expense related disagreements. Throughout 2008, 
with the assistance of legal counsel, environmental consultants and administrative personnel, the 
Board of Selectmen closely monitored legislative and regulatory developments regarding the 
proposed NET waste transfer center, continued to manage federal litigation relative to the Maple 
Meadow Landfill, and encouraged Health Department efforts to regulate operational activities at 
Krochmal Farms. 

As has been the tradition in more recent years, again in 2008 the Board of Selectmen has assumed a 
leadership role in promoting the educational well being of Wilmington's students. In addition to 
endorsing a budget which responsibly funds our school system at all grade levels, well beyond state 
mandates, the Board has been a vocal supporter of the Master Planning Study of Schools, and it 
voted unanimously to authorize a Statement of Interest to be filed with the Massachusetts School 
Building Authority relative to the design and feasibility study of a new public high school. While 
individual members of the Board have expressed different opinions about the most effective way to 
ensure that Wilmington High School continues to fulfill the programmatic needs of our students, 
they have been unanimous in moving the process forward, so that the taxpayers and residents of 
Wilmington can make an informed, responsible decision about continuing to improve the quality of 
education in Wilmington. 



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The Town's commitment to our men and women in uniform has never been more evident. In 2008, 
under the leadership of Veterans' Agent Lou Cimaglia, and with the help of scores of volunteers, the 
Town of Wilmington paid a fitting tribute to America's Vietnam Veterans by bringing the Moving 
Wall to Wilmington. After months of fastidious planning, the committee hosted several nights of 
meaningful and touching programs, with an array of guest speakers, gold star mothers, military 
personnel and their families, honor guards, bands, singers and flyovers. 

Also in 2008, the Town of Wilmington honored one of its most recent fallen heroes, PFC John F. 
Landry, Jr., by erecting and dedicating to Private Landry's memory a permanent memorial at Silver 
Lake. 



It has long been my opinion that the single most unique aspect of Wilmington, and indeed, its most 
valuable asset, is the willingness of its residents to be involved as volunteers. Danny Thomas once 
said, "Success in life has nothing to do with what you gain in life or accomphsh for yourself. It's 
what you do for others." I agree. The steadfast dedication of our volunteer board and committee 
members; the generous contributions of our volunteer coaches, fundraisers and local business 
owners; and the consistent and overwhelming support from our friends and neighbors for any 
worthwhile cause are the fabric of this community. The Board of Selectmen was pleased to work 
with a variety of such civic organizations and volunteers throughout 2008, including the Ahern 
Foundation, the Wilmington Sons of Italy, Local Heroes, the Wilmington VFW and the Wilmington 
Educational Foundation. 



In closing, on behalf of the Board of Selectmen, I would hke to acknowledge the dedicated service of 
Lance CPL Steven West, USMC, who tragically lost his life during active duty in Thailand. Rest 
assured, Wilmington will never forget Lance Corporal West's dedication to duty, and the sacrifices 
made by all of our men and women in uniform. 



Respectfuily submitted, 



y 1 




Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
Board of Selectmen 




Board of Selectmen from left, Michael V. McCoy, Raymond N. Lepore, 
Chairman Michael J. Newhouse, Charles R. Fiore, Jr. and Louis Cimaglia, IV. 



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TOWN OF WII.MINCiTON 

121 (iLKN ROAD 
WILMIN(;T0N, ma 01887 



OFFICE OF THE 
TOWN MANAGER 

(978)658-3311 



FAX (978) 658-3334 
TTY (978) 694-1417 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Wilmington: 

The economy held center stage throughout calendar year 2008. The country elected a new president 
who promised change and pledged to spearhead an economic recovery. The Town of Wilmington, 
although not immune from the harsh economic realities facing families, businesses, governments 
and other entities, fared better than many communities. Higher than expected local growth, 
conservative revenue forecasting and the careful monitoring of spending enabled Wilmington to 
increase its financial reserves consistent with its fiscal pohcies. 

The most recent Town of Wilmington audit commented on the Town's "extremely efficient job of 
managing its reserves." A strong financial reserve is critical to the Town's fiscal well-being. At the 
close of fiscal year 2008 the Massachusetts Department of Revenue certified the Town's "free cash" 
or general fund reserve at $4,775,044 which represents a better than 55% increase over the prior 
year. In last year's Annual Report, I indicated the Town's goal was to make certain that the general 
fund balance would exceed 6% of the operating budget by fiscal year 2010. In fact, the fiscal year 
2009 level stands at 6.28%. 

The precipitous decline in state revenues and a global economy reluctant to show signs of recovery 
pose an enormous challenge to government officials. Communities across the Commonwealth are 
contending with declining local receipts and are feeling the effects of a growing state budget gap 
which grows wider with each monthly report of state tax collections. The Town's purposeful buildup 
of strategic reserves provides a measure of financial security during the turbulent economic period 
that hes ahead. 

At the end of calendar year 2008, the Boston Globe published several articles on local development 
trends and municipal property taxes. "Bucking the Trend" is how they referred to the Town of 
Wilmington. One of the articles stated "rare is the community in which property taxes drop for 
homeowners, but that's the case in Wilmington." Rare indeed, but nevertheless a welcome respite 
for homeowners used to paying more, not less. The tax bills on the average assessed home for the 
period July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009 decreased by about $48. Although this "savings" may only 
pay for four pizzas, five if you use a coupon, the significance is that despite the decrease in taxes 
there will be no reduction in critical local services. One Wilmington resident who was quoted in a 
December 18, 2008 Boston Globe article said, "In general, Wilmington has lower taxes than many of 
the towns in Massachusetts for the services that we get, so even if mine does go up, I can't complain." 
Clearly town officials recognize their responsibility to prudently allocate its limited resources among 
a variety of important needs and in doing so ensuring a respect for the burden placed on the 
taxpayer. 



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Significant new commercial and residential growth activity occurred in 2008. The Main Street 
corridor was the focus of much of the new commercial development. Several businesses opened their 
doors at Wilmington Crossings, the town's newest retail/restaurant center. Anchored by Staples, the 
site also includes well-established retailers such as Sleepy's Mattress, The Dollar Tree, Pearl Vision 
and Fantastic Sams. Three food establishments, Starbuck's, D'Angelo and Kendra & Anthony's have 
located at Wilmington Crossings and two others, Ruby Tuesday and the Golden Ginger Restaurant, 
are poised to locate there as well. Danvers Bank has opened a stand-alone branch at the same site. 
Construction continues at Market Basket plaza. New CVS and Sovereign Bank buildings have 
opened at opposite ends of the plaza as part of the overall redevelopment of Wilmington's largest 
retail center. 



The former machine shop located further south on Main Street was demolished last year and 
replaced by an attractive retail center. Other commercial activity centers boasting new and 
renovated buildings include sites at 355 Middlesex Avenue, 911 Main Street and One Jewel Drive. 
Wilmington's strong industrial base was enhanced by major building projects undertaken by Charles 
River Laboratories and Koch Membrane. Regency Place, a modern 120 unit apartment complex on 
West Street, opened its doors in 2008 further diversifying Wilmington's market-rate and affordable 
housing offerings. 

In 2008 the Town purchased needed equipment, undertook numerous capital improvement projects 
and took steps to meet the needs of a growing community. Among the vehicles purchased were five 
replacement front-line police cruisers, a pick-up truck for the Fire Department, two School 
Department vans, three maintenance vehicles for the Department of Public Works and a pipe- 
cleaning Vactor truck, enabling wastewater and stormwater systems to be more efficiently 
maintained. 

There were a number of improvements made at various Town properties. The Wilmington Memorial 
Library, which experienced a 15% increase in circulation and a 23% increase in attendance at library 
sponsored events, was the beneficiary of much of the improvements. Renovations were made to the 
circulation, technology and children's area, a new energy-efficient parabolic lighting system and a 
new acoustical ceiling was installed on the first floor and the parking lot improvement project. 
Unking all three of the library's parking areas, was completed. 

Other major projects undertaken in 2008 included: 

1. the construction of a new playground at the Woburn Street School, funded by the Wilmington 
Sons of Italy; 

2. the reconstruction of field 4 at Palmer Park behind Town Hall, funded by the Wilmington 
Little League; 

3. the completion of roadway, filhng, grading and seeding work for the Wildwood Cemetery 
Phase II Expansion Project; 

4. the rehabilitation of the electrical system at the Industrial Way pump station; 

5. the replacement of a 4, 100 square foot roof area at the Department of Public Works garage; 

6. the completion of the engineering and design plans for the Main Street Sanitary Sewer 
Interceptor Rehabihtation Project; and 

7. the installation and implementation of an improved police communications system. 

A Master Planning Study was completed for the Wilmington Public Schools. The study produced a 
comprehensive assessment of existing school buildings and sites and investigated various options to 
meet the Town's future educational needs. Recommendations emanating from the study were 
presented at public forums in March and June. The findings concluded that a Wilmington High 
School construction project be undertaken, consistent with recommendations contained in the 2006- 
2011 Strategic Plan for the Wilmington Public Schools. The Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee voted unanimously to authorize the submission of a Statement of Interest to the 
Massachusetts School Building Authority, the entity that authorizes school construction funding 
from the Commonwealth. 



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The measure of a city or town can be found in the depth of its community spirit. We are fortunate to 
live in a community where residents and businesses embrace the concept of service, generosity and 
patriotism. Wilmington stands second to no other community when it comes to demonstrating its 
pride in America. Patriotism is evidenced each year by large turnouts at Memorial and Veterans' 
Day ceremonies, lender sunny skies and in the backdrop of Silver Lake, patriotism and bravery was 
recognized by Wilmington townspeople as hundreds gathered to remember and memorialize the 
sacrifice of Private First Class John F. Landry, Jr. On August 23'''' a monument was dedicated to the 
fallen soldier who gave his life in Iraq in pursuit of freedom throughout the world. The plaque on 
Private Landry's monument includes a quote from Ameha Earhart, "Courage is the price that life 
exacts for granting peace." 

From September 18 through September 22 visitors from throughout New England and beyond 
journeyed to the Wilmington Town Common to reflect on the meaning of freedom and to remember 
America's fallen heroes of the Vietnam War. The Town Common was never more properly adorned 
than on those days in which it hosted The Moving Wall which is a half-size replica of the Vietnam 
Veterans Memorial located in Washington, DC. The members of The Moving Wall Committee, under 
the leadership of Veterans' Services Director, Louis Cimaglia, are to be commended for bringing The 
Wall to Wilmington and enabling so many people the opportunity to experience its powerful 
message. Each ceremony was conducted with the solemnity and dignity befitting the sacrifice of 
more than 58,000 men and women who gave their life in the name of freedom and the more than one 
million brave Americans who fought in the Vietnam War. 

A number of town government "volunteers" concluded their service on various Town boards and 
committees in 2008. Each deserve the Town's gratitude for giving of their time and talents in service 
to our community. They include: Charles Wayman and Gayle Regan of the Elderly Services 
Commission; Kay Scanlon, member of the Housing Partnership; John Ciaramaglia of the 
Conservation Commission; Karl Sagal, Associate Member of the Board of Appeals; A. Quincy Vale 
and Wayne Arruda of the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; Marjorie MacDonald, longtime Chairman 
of the Cemetery Commission; William Hooper of the Board of Registrars and L. Barbara Hooper, 
Library Trustee. 

"The first requisite of a good citizen in this republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull 
his weight." These words from Theodore Roosevelt most assuredly described the good citizenship 
practiced by Jack Walsh, who for 16 years served on the Wilmington Finance Committee, many of 
those years as its Vice Chairman. His passing in October left a giant void on the committee that so 
benefited from his business acumen, financial expertise and his uncanny understanding of the big 
picture. Jack was a good and decent man whose character and leadership personified the highest 
standards of citizenship. 

Three new department heads were appointed in 2008, only one of whom was new to Wilmington 
government. John "Al" Spaulding of Everett replaced Daniel Paret who retired after serving as the 
Town's Building Inspector since 1995. Mr. Spaulding brings many years of private and public 
construction management experience to the position, including service as Building Inspector for 
three other municipalities. Treasurer/Collector M. Ronald Mendes resigned after eight years of 
service to accept a position as chief financial officer for a non-profit legal advocacy service. He was 
replaced by Deputy Treasurer/Collector Pamela MacKenzie, a 21 year employee of the 
Treasurer/Collector's office. Dan Stewart retired in February after more than 31 years on the Fire 
Department, the last 15 of which he served as Chief. The Town has been the beneficiary of Chief 
Stewart's passionate dedication to the fire service and his unequivocal commitment to the 
community. He was replaced by a 35 year veteran of the department, Deputy Chief Edward 
Bradbury. Chief Bradbury is an effective, experienced leader fully capable of improving upon the 
good works of his predecessors. A long-time veteran of the Fire Department, Lieutenant Edmund 
Corcoran was promoted to Deputy Chief. 



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Among the other municipal retirees in 2008 were Everett "Bud" Stanley who worked for the 
Department of Public Works for more than 20 years retiring as a DPW Working Foreman; 
Lieutenant Christopher Nee, who began his employment with the Town's Water Department in 1973 
prior to his permanent appointment to the Fire Department in 1984; Linda Callahan, Reference and 
Adult Services Librarian for the Wilmington Memorial Library; Mary Lipski, a familiar and welcome 
presence at the Buzzell Senior Center; Senior Clerk Joyce Murray, a 20 year employee of the 
Treasurer/Collector's office and James Babineau, who for 21 years served the Town as its Sealer of 
Weights and Measures. 

For the fifth consecutive year, the Town of Wilmington's annual report was recognized by the 
Massachusetts Municipal Association as one of the best in the Commonwealth. 1 encourage 
residents to read the individual department reports which summarizes activities undertaken in 2008 
and better explains each department's mission. The report is intended to be both informative and 
useful, but by no means exhaustive. We hope this document fosters a better understanding of 
Wilmington government and the availability of its services, and encourages questions and 
participation from all of Wilmington's residents. 

Thank you for the opportunity to serve the Town of Wilmington. I look forward to working with all 
of you for the betterment of this extraordinary community. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Michael A. Caira 
Town Manager 




Town Manager Michael Caira accepts Annual Report Contest Award from MM A Executive Director Geoff Beckwith. 



ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 



Town Clerk 

The Town Clerk serves as Public Information Officer, Chief Election Officer and Local Registrar of 
Vital Records and Statistics. The Clerk is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that the 
appropriate process, with notification and procedure, is adhered to in the making of legislative policy 
and of managing public access to this information. This office is often the first door of government 
accessed by individuals seeking information and the resolution of problems. It is with a sense of 
pride and accomplishment that we submit this annual report with the hope that we have served our 
citizens well. 



The following information and vital statistics were recorded during 2008: 



Births 236 

Marriage Intentions 91 

Marriages 90 

Deaths 246 

Deaths - Out of State 6 

Burial Permits 153 

Veterans Buried in Wildwood Cemetery 34 



Flammable Permits and Registrations: 

Flammable permits are issued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk's office. Notice is 
sent to the owner or occupant of land where the storage is located on or about April 1st for renewal 
by April 30th of each year. Failure to register on time, or to comply with the Board's regulations, 
may result in revocation of the permit after a public hearing. Fifty-three permits were issued during 
the year. 



Permits & Recordings: 

Uniform Commercial Code Terminations 

Business Certificates and Withdrawals 199 

Federal Lien Recordings 

Federal Lien Releases 

Fish and Wildlife Licenses 265 

Pole & Conduit Locations 7 

Dog Licenses 1,965 

Raffle and Bazaar Permits 9 



The Town Clerk also serves as Clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity she has met with 
the Board of Registrars on a regular monthly meeting night, kept the minutes up to date and 
supervised all elections and the annual town census by mail. The Town Clerk's office also maintains 
current voting lists and registers voters during regular office hours. She also meets with the Board 
for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify nomination papers for candidates. 



Town Meetings & Elections 2008: 

Presidential Primary February 5 

Annual Town Election April 26 

Annual Town Meeting May 3 

State Primary September 16 

State Election November 4 



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Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the town By-laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars 
were held on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and to conduct business. 
Under Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were 
so posted in the Town Hall. The Board also met many times for certification of signatures on 
nomination papers and assisted at all elections and town meetings. 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 51, 
Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32 and supervised the conduct of elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 
64 and Chapter 53, Sections 43 and 63, all in accordance with the Town Charter and By-laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. 

The calendar year 2008 had a total of 15,843 registered voters from our listed 22,616 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank the 10,034 households that returned their town census 
forms in 2008. 

Town Couosel 

1. Advice & Legal Documents . Advisory opinions were rendered to various town officials and 
boards relating to a wide variety of issues and subjects. Frequent and ongoing attention was 
given to reviewing and/or drafting By-laws, easements, public document requests, 
compliance with the State Ethics Act and Open Meeting Law, various town rules and 
regulations, warrants for Town Meetings, and other legal documents. 

2. Contracting & Procurement . During the period of our involvement with the town, we 
reviewed contracts, agreements, procurement documents, DAG grant applications, and 
homeowner betterment agreements. 

3. Projects . We assisted the town in connection with the Olin property contamination issue. 
Maple Meadow Landfill, New England Transrail, the MWRA water connection, water 
resource allocation plans, affordable housing initiatives, road acceptance issues, various real 
estate projects, betterment agreements, easement issues, various 40B Comprehensive Permit 
issues such as the Crystal Commons and other 40B projects and controversies related to the 
impact of the operations of Krochmal Farm. 

4. Labor. Our labor specialists provided advice to the town on various personnel issues and 
collective bargaining disputes. 

5. Administrative Agencv Proceedings . We assisted the town in various proceedings before 
various administrative agencies including the Office of the Attorney General, Appellate Tax 
Board, State Labor Relations Commission, Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination, Alcohol Beverage Control Commission and Department of Environmental 
Protection. 

6. Miscellaneous . We provided advice to the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager, Water 
and Sewer Commission and various other public officials regarding a variety of matters. 
These issues included expansion of the Town's Board of Appeals from three to five regular 
members, state sanitary code, tobacco, smoking, piggeries, alcohol issues (including issues 
regarding farmer-wineries, transfer of package store licenses and 'pouring permits' for 
dispensing of alcohol by the glass without sales), common victualer issues, permitting and 
licensing issues, conflicts of interest, open meeting law and procedure, land use and zoning, 
procurement and competitive bid procedures and the enforcement of laws and regulations. 



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Litigation. Adversary Proceedings & Claims . 

As of December 31. 2008, there were a total of 52 lawsuits, adversary proceedings and claims 
pending of which we have been informed: 

4 lawsuits involving the Board of Appeals: 

• Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Land Court, Misc. No. 17945 L 

• Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Land Court, Misc. No. 179448. 

• Scott Garrant. James Diorio. Kevin Brander. Michael Sorrentino and Ann Yurek as they 
are members of the Wilmington Planning Board v. Charles E. Boyle, John R. Forest. Dan 
Wandell, Jr. as they are members of the Wilmington Board of Appeals and Mark Nelson, 
individually . Land Court, Misc. No. 267499. 

• Monica Gilardi as Trustee of the Marie R. Gilardi Irrevocable Trust v. Board of Appeals 
and Dennis Delucia as Trustee of Delucia Family Trust . Land Court 07 MISC 351312. 

7 lawsuits involving the Planning Board: 

• Presidential Development Corporation, et al v. Wilmington Planning Board . Land Court, 
Misc. No. 192780. 

• Robert Troy v. Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington . Land Court, Misc. No. 
274810. 

• Nelson v. Sorrentino . Middlesex Superior Court, Civil Action No. 2006-4347. 

• Mark D. Nelson v. Town Manager, the Chairman of Board of Selectmen, the Town Clerk 
and Jon Mehtala. Information Systems . Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No. 2008- 
00780. 

• Mark D. Nelson v. The Town of Wilmington, the Board of Appeals, the Planning Board. 
Daniel W. Paret. as the former Building Inspector of the Town of Wilmington. John 
Spaulding as the current Building Inspector of the Town of Wilmington. Carole 
Hamilton. Director of Planning and Conservation, the Town Manager and the Town 
Water & Sewer Commission . Land Court 08 MISC. 383336. 

• Feeney v. Hamilton. Town of Wilmington. Planning Board . Middlesex Superior Court 
Civil Action No. 2008-03923. 

• Sheridan Lane LLC v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, Docket No. 08- 
2843. 

5 Proceedings involving the Board of Selectmen: 

• New England Transrail. LLC Petition for Exemption . Surface Transportation Board 
Docket No. 34797. 

• Spinazola 1994 Revocable Trust v. Town of Wilmington and J. Does. 1-15. Civil Action 
No. 06-10406-RGS (U.S. District Court). 

• Eleanor Estates. LLC v. Town of Wilmington (Board of Selectmen) . Land Court 08 MISC 
368308. 

• Howe V. Shine (Defendant and Third Party Plaintiff) v. Town of Wilmington (Third Party 
Defendant) . Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No. 2007-00677. 

• In the Matter of Santini Family. Inc. d/h/a Sonny's Mobil-on-the-Run. Alcohol Beverage 
Control Commission. 

3 lawsuits involving the Police Department: 

• Carter v. Wilmington . (Police Department) Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination, No. 06BPD01306. 

• NEPBA. Local 1 v. Town of Wilmington. AAA No. 11 390 01755 08. 

• Robert F. Murphy. Ill v. Town of Wilmington. Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination . 



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4 Proceedings involving the Water and Sewer Commission: 



• Wilmington v. Department of Environmental Protection . DEP Docket No. 2003-074. 

• Wilmington v. Department of Environmental Protection . DEP Docket No. 2008-047. 

• In re. MTBE Liabilitv Litigation , U. S. District Court, Southern District of New York, 
MDL-1358. 

• Mercury Refining Superfund Settlement . 
6 lawsuits involving the Town Manager: 

• AFSCME CouncU 93 v. Town of Wilmington. AAA No. 1 1 390 02093 07. 

• Dunderdale v. Town of Wilmington et al. U.S. District Court, Civil Action No. 10974- 
RCL. 

• AFSCME Council 93 v. Town of Wilmington . AAA No. 11 390 01749 08. 

• AFSCME. Council 93 v. Town of Wilmington . AAA No. 11 390 00323 08. 

• AFSCME Council 93 v Town of Wilmington . AAA No. 11 390 00322 08. 

• AFSCME. Council 93 v Town of Wilmington . AAA No. 11 390 01023 08. 

1 DEP administrative proceedings involving the Conservation Commission: 

• In the Matter of Edward T. McLaughlin. Trustee. ETM Realtv Trust . DEP File No. 344- 
635, DALA Docket No. DEP-05-1224. 

1 Lawsuit involving the Board of Assessors: 

• I. Fred DiCenso Trust v. The Board of Assessors of the Town of Wilmington . Appellate 
Tax Board Docket Nos. F276917-04-PRO, et al. 

1 Lawsuit involving the Department of Pubhc Works: 

• Johnson v. Moaklev et al. and Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, C.A. No. 

07- 02271-B. 

1 Lawsuit involving the Board of Public Health: 

• Krochmal Farm LLC v. Wilmington Board of Health . Middlesex Superior Court, C.A. No. 

08- 04810-L2. 

1 Bankruptcy involving the Tax Collector 

• In re Brown Bankruptcy . U.S. Bankruptcy Court, District of Massachusetts, Case No. 07- 
175000. 

18 Claims which are not yet lawsuits: 

• Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection v. Town of Wilmington 
(Maple Meadow Landfill). 

• Town of Wilmington v. Olin Chemical Corporation . 

• Witmore v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Liberty Mutual as subrogee for Tentmakers Moving LLC v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Kiesinger v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Galante v. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Gilhs V. Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Duffy V. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 



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f 4 

i . 



• Emrich v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• David Boutiette v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• O Neil V. Town of WUmington (DPW). 

• Hermann v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Lemos v. Town of Wilmington (School) . 

• Pupa V. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Martiniello v. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Plummer v. Town of Wilmington (Conservation Commission) . 

• Gore V. Town of Wilmington (DPW) . 

• Coates V. Town of Wilmington (Police Department) . 

Each of the above efiforts required the participation of numerous town officials and private citizen 
volunteers - all working together towards a better Wilmington. 

Thanks to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager and all other town officials and citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance towards another successful year. 




Selectman Louis Cimaglia and Town Manager Michael Caira with Jamie Champey of SignFab 



who donated the new Town Hall sign. 



-12- 



ssessors 



RECAPITULATION - 


2008 FISCAL YEAR 


Total Appropriation 




Special Education 


0.00 


County Retirement Assessment 


3,200,477.00 


Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 


432,304.00 


Air Pollution Districts 


6,394.00 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


6,217.00 


Mosquito Control Project 


45,944.00 


Amount Certified by Collector & 




Treasurer for Tax Title 


v.yjv 


Overlfiv of Currpnt Year 


686 695 85 


Cherry Sheet Offsets 


46,526.00 


M.W.K.A 


0.00 


Final Court Judgments 


0.00 


KMV Surcharge 


16,060.00 


Miscellaneous 


81,070.00 


Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 




2007 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 


$12,464,322.00 


Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


2,777,102.00 


Penalties and Interest on Taxes 


270,000.00 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


610,000.00 


Charges for Services - Sewer 


2,000,000.00 


Other Charges for Services 


250,000.00 


Fees 


50,000.00 


Rentals 


85,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - Library 


15,000.00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 


60,000.00 


Other Department Revenue 


350,000.00 


Licenses and Permits 


600,000.00 


Special Assessments 


1,000.00 


Fines and Forfeits 


150,000.00 


Investment Income 


500,000.00 


Voted from Available Funds 


847,650.00 


Free Cash 


575,000.00 


Miscellaneous 


0.00 



$66,733,909.00 



4.521.687.85 
$71,255,596.85 



$21.605.074.00 



Real Estate 

Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 



$ 2,909,751,135.00 @ 10.16 p/t 

$ 134,597,365.00 @ 22.96 p/t 

$ 679,853,200.00 @ 22.96 p/t 

$ 60,438,430.00 @ 22.96 p/t 



$29,563,071.53 
3,090,355.50 
15,609,429.47 
1.387.666.35 

$49,650,522.85 



-13- 



1 reasiirer/ Collector 




Commitments 




■'008 Prpliminarv Rpnl F,<?tflt<» 


^fi^*^ fi47 ft'^ifi '^0 


'^007 Rpal Rstntp 


4fi 9^9 4*17 Q4 


mV-'V'O 1 1 vl i 111 11 let I > i CrioCllCtl 1 i U|Jd Ljr 




mV.'v^ J X ci oLiiiai J. 


1 IQ*^ ftl9 40 








1 f^7 1 ^^4 ^fl 


9005 Evrisp 


15 279 71 


A TT\ n 1 1 1 Q n 

rAlIl ULildllL'C 


R7f\ 9ft9 fil 


Aoooffirinpn StKPPf Pp t f"Pi'Tn Pn f"Q 

* ijJjJUl llwllCLl kJUlCd- iJCl-l'd IIICIIUO 




T r\ fprpQi" 

111 LCI CTo L 


104 '^ifi 


Ar^nnrf innpn SIpwpt* Ppi'i'pyrnpni'Q 




T n1"Pi"Pct" 

ill tCl CoU 


Ql fi04 fiO 


.^PWPl* T.1PT1G 
OC VV CI J^lClio 


•^Q IfiO fi4 


W^5i1"pr T^ipnQ 

Tt Cl tCl UlCiiO 


138 103 22 


r ippf T'lp T .ipnQ 

llilCL^LllC l^lCllo 




Apportioned Title 5 Betterments 


15,447.45 


Interest 


4,397.85 


Total 


$76,196,193.91 


Collections 




IVCdi i-iotdl/C 


<R47 098 540 02 


Ppycnncjl Pyr^nPT'l'v 

JL CloUlldi 1 liJ|JCl hj 


1 1 1 2 1 58 45 

X) X xLdy xkj\J*'-xk3 


n Yr*i CP 


3 291 460 78 


SJfTPPt" PpffpY'TTlPni'G 
O 1>1 CC 1/ UC UUCl IXiCll Lo 


501 57 


^PWPf* Rpi't'PT'TYlPni'G 
OC W CI XJC tl/CI lliCli Lo 


IP, 401 33 


Titlp V Rpt1-prmpnt<j 

1 1 tic V i_>C LLC I IXlCill'O 


14 128 14 

X 'Tj X ^O. X t 


lA/Q't'PY' Tjpnc 

TV dtCX XjXCIIo 


1 27 625 97 

X^ 1 y\J ^KJ . \J 1 


.^PWPT* T.IPTIQ 
ocwcx X^XCllO 


35 817 60 


XZjXCULIXL> X^XCllo 


24 361 06 


XliAv^ioC llXI/ClCol/ dXlLl V/iXciXgCO 


98 630 46 


A rn ni il 51 npp 
r\iii u LXXctiiwC 


521 502 68 


T ion 1 Pft"! Tl PQ i'PC 
l^iCll V_/Cl l/XIXUdLCo 


24 25*? 00 

^^y *^ .\J\J 


Rpf'f'P'rm P n f i PT'i'iTif*ci f'Pa 

XJC t LCI lllCI 1 1 V_/CX LXXXCdl/CO 


88 00 


[vT icppil iinpmiG 

IVX l&V^Clld IICU Ulo 


2 942 17 


\A/q f"Pr 1 ol iPpfinnG 

VV dvCX V_/l,/XXCC LXL/XlO 


3 743 878 67 


.^pwpr ilnllppfinriG 

OC W Cl V^VJXXCV' Ll^Jl io 


1 951 896 68 


XVCdi iZioLdtC lllUClCoL OC' v^lldl^Co 


1 23 596 92 


PpTGATml Pfnnpi*t"v Tnf'PT'PGi' <v iinQt*o'"pQ 

XT CI oUXldX X I UpCX i>y X XX UCX COL V^lldl gCo 


4,477.18 


1 dX 1 iLies 




Tax Title Interest 


17,847.90 


Total 


$58,409,577.43 



-14 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2 008 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 



The Annual General Purpose Financial Statements of the town of Wilmington for 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008 are hereby submitted. This report was prepared 
by the Office of the Town Accountant. Responsibility for accuracy of the data and 
the completeness and fairness of the presentation, including all disclosures, rests 
with the town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data are accurate in all 
material respects and are reported in a manner designed to present fairly the 
financial position and results of operations of the various funds and account groups 
of the government . 



Respectfully submitted. 




Michael Morris 
Town Accountant 



-15- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 2008 

Table of Contents 



PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet-All Fund Types and Account Groups 17 

Notes to Financial Statements 18 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund 

Types and Expendable Trust Funds 22 

Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet - Special Revenue Accounts 23 

Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balance - Special Revenue Accounts 24 

Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 

Authorization by Function and Activity - General Fund 25 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Water Department Fund 31 

Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Capital Projects Fund 32 

Schedule of Debt Retirement 33 

Schedule of Trust Funds 34 



-16- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUND GROUPS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 



Assets 



General 



Total 

Special Capital Trusts Long-Term (Memorandum 
Revenue Projects Agency Debt Only) 



Cash 

Cash - Health Group Deposit 
Receivables: 

General Property Taxes 817,827.65 
Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions (1 ,164,351 .62) 

Tax Liens 518,598.22 

Tax Foreclosures 631,964.61 

Motor Vehicle Excise 376,185.10 

Departmental 130,882.62 

Betterments 735,763.03 

User Charges 60,987.77 

Due from Other Gov'ts 

Amounts to be provided for: 
Retirement of Long Term Debt 



8,224,166.35 5,057,589.48 



59,616.52 2,761,866.56 
1,519,400.00 



218,698.32 
319,374.62 



16,103,238.91 
1,519,400.00 

817,827.65 
(1,164,351.62) 
518,598.22 
631,964.61 
376,185.10 
130,882.62 
735,763.03 
279,686.09 
319,374.62 

10,876,673.96 10,876,673.96 



Total Assets 



10,332,023.73 5,595,662.42 



59,616.52 4,281,266.56 10,876,673.96 31,145,243.19 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 

Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 

Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings 

Incurred Costs 



794,702.43 114,283.90 

817,827.65 

2,454,381.35 538,072.94 

15,043.65 



28,499.80 



10,876,673.96 



1,389,565.12 



937,486.13 

817,827.65 
2,992,454.29 
10,876,673.96 
15,043.65 
1,389,565.12 



Total Liabilities 



4,081,955.08 652,356.84 



0.00 1,418,064.92 10,876.673.96 17,029,050.80 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



1.188.390.32 1,007,191.30 
3,252,531.28 

683,583.00 

5.061.678.33 0.00 



2,651.137.52 
40,000.00 
59,616.52 172,064.12 



2,195,581.62 
5,903,668.80 
723,583.00 
5,293,358.97 



Total Fund Balance 



6,250,068.65 4,943,305.58 



59,616.52 2,863,201.64 



0.00 14,116,192.39 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 10,332,023.73 5,595,662.42 



59,616.52 4,281,266.56 10,876,673.96 31,145,243.19 



-17- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
JUNE 30, 2 008 



1 . Definition of Reporting Entity 

The Town of Wilmington is incorporated as a municipality in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. It is governed by an elected Board of Selectmen and an open 
Town Meeting. The Board of Selectmen appoint a Town Manager who in accordance 
with Chapter 592 of 1950, serves as chief fiscal and administrative officer of 
the town. Other town officials are appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the 
Town Manager. Generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires that 
the accompanying general purpose financial statements present the Town of 
Wilmington (the primary government) and its component units. Component units 
are included in the Town's reporting entity if their operational and financial 
relationships with the Town are significant. Pursuant to this criteria, the 
following entities have been excluded from the accompanying general purpose 
financial statements : 

Wilmington Housing Authority - provides housing for the elderly as well 
as subsidizing low income housing units. 

Middlesex Regional Retirement System - provides county government and 
various services for member communities . 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School District - 
provides education services for member communities. 

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority - provides sewage disposal 
services . 

2 . Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the town of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for local 
governmental units except as indicated in Note 3 . The following is a summary 
of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The town reports its financial activities in several funds and one 
account group in order to comply with the limitations and restrictions 
placed on both the resources made available to the town and the services 
provided. The various funds are grouped in the financial statements in 
this report into five generic fund types as follows: 

Governmental Funds 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of 
the town. It is used to account for all financial resources except those 
required to be accounted for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - Special revenue funds are used to account 
for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (other than expendable 
trust or major capital projects) that are legally restricted to 
expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to account 
for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of 
major capital facilities. 



-18- 



Fiduciary Funds 



Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to account 
for assets held by the tovm in a trustee capacity or as an agent for 
individuals, private organizations, other governments and/or other funds. 
These include expendable trust, non-expendable trust and agency funds. 
Non-expendable trust funds are accounted for in a manner that permits the 
periodic measurements of revenues earned, expenses incurred and/or net 
income in order to demonstrate maintenance of capital. Expendable trust 
funds are accounted for in essentially the same manner as governmental 
funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabilities) 
and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to 
be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in the general long- 
term debt group of accounts. This account group is not a fund. It is 
only concerned with the measurement of financial position and, therefore, 
is not involved with a measurement of the results from any operations. 

B . Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This method 
recognizes revenues when they become measurable and available. Expenses 
are recognized under this method as they are incurred. 

Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they become 
available. Available means then due or past due and receivable within 
the current period or expected to be collected soon enough thereafter to 
be used to pay liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is 
received . 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental 
revenues, the legal and contractual requirements of the numerous 
individual programs are used as guidance. There are, however, 
essentially two types of these revenues. In one, moneys must be expended 
on the specific purpose or project before any amounts will be paid to the 
town. Therefore, revenues are recognized based upon the expenditures 
recorded. In the other, moneys are virtually unrestricted as to purpose 
of expenditure and are usually revocable only for failure to comply with 
prescribed compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to accrual 
criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash 
disbursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts General 
Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days immediately following 
the close of each fiscal year and which pertain to the prior year are 
recorded as warrants payable and expenses as of June 3 0th. 

Purchase orders and other contractual obligations outstanding at 
June 3 0th related to annual operating expenses are recorded as 
encumbrances and, accordingly, as a reservation of fund balances at that 
date . 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenue that is 
measurable but not available has been classified as deferred revenue on 
June 3 0th. 

Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase orders, 
contracts and other commitments for the expenditure of funds are recorded 
in order to reserve that portion of the applicable appropriation, is 



-19- 



employed in governmental funds. Open encumbrances at year-end are 
reported as reservations of fund balances. Encumbrances do not 
constitute expenditures or liabilities. 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are recorded 
as expenditures when purchased (purchase method) . 

General Fixed Assets - General fixed assets are recorded as 
expenditures in applicable governmental funds. The town does not 
capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a general fixed asset 
account group, which is consistent with the practice of many 
municipalities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C. Total Columns 

Total columns on the cotT±)ined statements are captioned Memorandum 
Only to indicate that they are presented only to facilitate financial 
analysis. Data in these columns do not present financial position, 
results of operations or changes in financial position in conformity with 
generally accepted accounting principles. Such data is not comparable to 
a consolidation since interfund eliminations have not been made. 

D . Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Regional Retirement System, a 
single employer plan, established under Chapter 32 of the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Substantially all full-time and some 
part-time employees of the town except teachers and certain 
administrative personnel employed by the School Department participate in 
the system. Benefits paid under the plan, referred to as retirement 
allowance, include both an annuity portion, funded principally from 
amounts contributed by the participants, and a pension portion funded by 
the town. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their 
compensation annually, determined by their date of employment. The 
employer contribution by the town as determined by the County's actuarial 
valuation normal cost plus the amortization of the original unfunded 
actuarial liability. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan administered by 
the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board. Contributions to this plan 
are made entirely by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and therefore, 
the town does not contribute to the plan. 

Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the town presented its financial statements on the 
basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many significant respects 
from G. A. A. P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. The departures from G.A.A.P. 
under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. The town has 
adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statements. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the town of Wilmington's 
financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with Chapter 32 
of the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (see note ID) . 

B. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at 
the time purchases is made rather than being capitalized in a general 
fixed asset group of accounts. 



-20- 



C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as 
expenditures rather than assets at time of purchase. 



4 . Budgetary Accounting 

An annual budget is legally adopted for the General Fund. All financial orders 
are initiated or recommended at Town meetings. Expenditures are limited to the 
line items as voted at the Town meetings. Department heads may not transfer, 
without approval , appropriation balances from one expenditure account to 
another within their department or budget. These along with transfers or 
unencumbered appropriation balances between departments or agencies must be 
approved at Town Meetings . 

5 . Long-term Debt 

State law permits the town to authorize indebtedness up to a limit of 5% of its 
equalized valuation. Debt issued in accordance with this state law is 
designated as being inside the debt limit. In addition, however, a town may 
authorize debt in excess of that limit for specific purposes. Such debt when 
issued is designated as being outside the debt limit. The following summarized 
the annual debt service requirements as of June 30, 2008. 



General Obligation Bonds 

Principal Interest Total 

Outstanding June 30, 2007 $14,418,834 $1,763,319 $16,182,153 

Retirements $ 3,542,160 $ 703,765 $ 4,245,925 

Outstanding June 30, 2008 $10,876,674 $1,059,554 $11,936,228 




-21- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON. MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES • ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 

Fiduciary 











Fund Types 


Total 




General 


Special 


Capital 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 






Revenue 


Projects 


Trust 


Only) 


REVENUES: 












General Property Taxes 


49,143,220.28 


0.00 






49,143,220.28 


Tax Liens 


254,315.23 


151,592.83 






405,908.06 


Special Assessments 


86.618.63 


40,947.64 






127,566.27 


Excise 


1 AOCt AHA 17 


U-UU 








Penalties 


295,855.79 


0.00 






295,855.79 


Licenses and Permits 


879,341.86 


0.00 




44,293.50 


923,635.36 


Intergovernmental 


12,423,380.85 


3,732,292.27 




777.61 


16,156,450.73 


Charges for Services 


2,338,145.06 


6,981.461.55 




730,26261 


10,049,869.22 


Fines 


144,534.70 


0.00 






144,534.70 


Fees 


63,460.45 


0.00 






63,460.45 


Interest Earnings 


485,946.80 


7,165.53 




31,283,71 


524,396.04 


Appropriation Refunds 




0.00 






0.00 


Payroll Deductions 




0.00 






0.00 


Gifts 




162,562.54 




2,659,044.51 


2,821,607.05 


Healtti WorVing Deposit 




0.00 




1,519,400.00 


1,519,400.00 


Ottier 


1,474,735.25 


234,933.48 




529,610.01 


2,239,278.74 


Total Revenues 


71,010,039.27 


11,310,955.84 


0.00 


5,514,671.95 


87,835,667.06 


EXPENDITURES: 












General Government 


1,758,631.03 


16,739.38 




150,228.94 


1,925,599.35 


Public Safety 


7,345,822.76 


174,056.87 




610,365.76 


8,130,245.39 


Human Services 








19 7R^ 01 


1 17R AkCl 11 


Public Works 


5,504,071.89 


2,461,484.44 




14,600.00 


7,980,156.33 


Community Development 


744,968.83 


100,478.73 




695.00 


846,142.56 


Building Maintenance 


3,944,399.20 


226.22 




69,982.68 


4,014,608.10 


Education 


30,408,312.67 


5,432,688.38 




441,557.50 


36,282,558.55 


Reaeation 


107,913.07 


652,794.93 






760,708.00 


Veterans' Services 


239,558.87 


0.00 






239,558.87 


Debt and Interest 


4,246,214.50 


0.00 






4,246,214.50 


Unclassified 


8,248,764.11 


15,687.27 




2,342,186.04 


10,606,637.42 


Healtti Incurred Costs 




0.00 




1,389,565.12 


1,389,565.12 


Statutory Charges 


5,573,367.00 


0.00 






5,573,367.00 


Capital Outiay 


772,423.36 


3,499,938.27 






4,272,361.63 


Wan-ant Articles 


105,251.16 


0.00 






105,251.16 


Total Expenditures 


70,075,056.20 


12,442,451.66 


0.00 


5,031,946.25 


87,549,454.11 


Excess (deficiency) of 












Revenues over Expenditures 


934,983.07 


(1,131,495.82) 


0.00 


482,725.70 


286,212.95 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 












Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 












Operating Transfers In 


818,869.46 


0.00 




269,917.98 


1,088,787.44 


Operating Transfers Out 


(269,917.98) 


(678,778.00) 


(125,091.46) 


(15,000.00) 


(1,088,787.44) 


State and County Charges 










0.00 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


548,951.48 


(678,778.00) 


(125,091.46) 


254,917.98 


0.00 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 












and Other Financing Sources 












over Expenditures and Ottier Uses 


1,483,934.55 


(1,810,273.82) 


(125,091.46) 


737,643.68 


286,212.95 


Fund Balance July 1, 2007 


5,162,523.20 


6,753,579.40 


184,707.98 


2,125,557.96 


14,226,368.54 


Increase in Provision for 












Abatements and Exemptions 


(396,389.10) 








(396,389.10) 


Fund Balance June 30, 2008 


6,250,068.65 


4,943,305.58 


59,616.52 


2,863,201.64 


14,116,192.39 



-22- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 



Assets 



Grants 



Gifts 



Reserved for 
Appropriation 



Revolving 



Water 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



Cash 

Cash - Health Group Deposit 
Receivables; 

General Property Taxes 

Less: Prov for Abates & Exemptions 

Tax Liens 

Tax Foreclosures 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Departmental 

Betterments 

User Charges 
Due from Other Gov'ts 
Amounts to be provided for: 

Retirement of Long Term Debt 



193,598.30 266,075.54 



164,902.67 1,345,303.73 3,087,709.24 5,057,589.48 



319,374.62 



218,698.32 



218,698.32 
319,374.62 



Total Assets 



512,972.92 266,075.54 



164,902.67 1,345,303.73 3,306,407.56 5,595,662.42 



Liabilities & Fund Balance 



Liabilities: 

Warrants Payable 

Deferred Revenue: 
General Property Taxes 
Other Accounts Receivable 

Notes Payable 

Payroll Withholdings 

Incurred Costs 



29,144.47 



319,374.62 



807.00 



55,369.75 28,962.68 



218,698.32 



114,283.90 



538,072.94 



Total Liabilities 



348,519.09 807.00 



0.00 55,369.75 247,661.00 



652,356.84 



Fund Balance: 
Res. For Encumbrances 
Res. For Special Purpose 
Res. For Subsequent Years 
Unreserved-Undesignated 



164,453,83 265,268.54 



144,902.67 
20,000.00 



1,289,933.98 



1,007,191.30 
1,387,972.26 
663,583.00 



1,007,191.30 
3,252,531.28 
683,583.00 



Total Fund Balance 



164,453.83 265,268.54 



164,902.67 1,289,933.98 3,058,746.56 4,943,305.58 



Total Liabilities & Fund Balance 512,972.92 266,075.54 



164,902.67 1,345,303.73 3,306,407.56 5,595,662.42 



-23- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON. MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES ■ SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 2008 



Grants 



Gifts Reserved for 
Appropnatjon 



REVENUES: 
General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Penalties 

Licenses and Permits 

Intergovernmental 

Charges for Services 

Fines 

Fees 

Interest Earnings 
Appropriation Refunds 
Payroll Deductions 
Gifts 

Oltier 



Revolving 
Funds 



40,947.64 



Water 



151.592.83 



3,537,066.12 



6,886.48 



13,383.38 



195,226.15 
3,036,663.77 3,944,797.78 



112,899.24 



279.05 



33.305,30 



49,663.30 
122,635.76 



65,609.04 



Total 



0.00 
151,592.83 
40,947.64 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
3,732,292.27 
6,981,461.55 
0.00 
0.00 
7,165.53 
0.00 
0.00 
162,562.54 
0.00 
234,933.48 



Total Revenues 


3.557.335.98 


112,899.24 


33,584.35 


3,445,136.62 


4,161,999.65 


11,310,955.84 


EXPENDITURES: 














General Government 


6.626.46 






10,112.92 




16,739.38 


Public Safety 


170,724.87 


3,332.00 








174,056.87 


Human Services 


60,708.76 


10,047.71 




17,600.70 




88,357.17 


Public Works 


438,039.49 


68,293.00 




54,624.10 


1,900,527.85 


2,461,484.44 


Community Development 


83,099.57 


15,468.56 




1,910.60 




100,478.73 


Building Maintenance 








226.22 




226.22 


Education 


2,759,926.84 






2,672,761.54 




5,432,688.38 


Recreation 








652,794.93 




652,794.93 


Veterans' Services 












0.00 


Debt and Interest 












0.00 


Unclassified 


15,687.27 










15,687.27 


Incurred Costs 












0.00 


Statutory Charges 












0.00 


Capital Outtay 










3,499,938.27 


3,499,938.27 


Wan'ant Articles 












0.00 



Total Expenditijres 


3,534,813.26 


97,141.27 


0.00 


3,410,031.01 


5,400,466.12 


12,442,451.66 


Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 


22.522.72 


15,757.97 


33,584.35 


35,105.61 


(1,238,466.47) 


(1,131,495.82) 


OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES) 
Proceeds of General Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
State and County Charges 






(30,000.00) 




(648,778.00) 


0.00 
0.00 
(678,778.00) 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


0.00 


0.00 


(30,000.00) 


0.00 


(648,778.00) 


(678,778.00) 


Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Otiier Financing Sources 
over Expenditijres and Otiier Uses 


22,522.72 


15,757,97 


3,584.35 


35,105.61 


(1,887,244.47) 


(1,810,273.82) 


Fund Balance July 1,2007 


141,931.11 


249,510.57 


161,318.32 


1,254,828.37 


4,945,991.03 


6,753,579.40 


Increase in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 














Fund Balance June 30, 2008 


164,453.83 


265,268 54 


164,902.67 


1,289,933.98 


3,058,746,56 


4,943,305.58 



-24- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 







CARRY FWD 


TRANSFER & 






CARRY FWD 




FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




TO FY 08 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


TO FY 09 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 07 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FROM FY 08 


FISCAL 2008 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT' 
















Selectmen 


Stipend 


0.00 


4,032.00 


4,032.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Selectmen 


Expenses 


0.00 


14,260.00 


13,252.98 


1,007.02 


0.00 


1,007.02 






0.00 


18,292.00 


17,284.98 


1,007.02 


0.00 


1,007.02 


Elections 


Salaries 


0.00 


21,044.00 


15,311.38 


5,732.62 


0.00 


5,732.62 


Elections 


Constable 


0.00 


175.00 


175.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elections 


Expenses 


0.00 


7,270.00 


6,477.34 


792.66 


0,00 


792.66 






0.00 


28,489.00 


21,963.72 


6,525.28 


0.00 


6,525.28 


Registrars 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,875.00 


1,875.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Registrars 


Expenses 


0.00 


6,000.00 


5,987.69 


12.31 


0.00 


12.31 




0.00 


7,875.00 


7,862,69 


12.31 


0.00 


12.31 


Finance Comm. 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,292.00 


640.80 


651.20 


0.00 


651.20 


Finance Comm. 


Expenses 


0.00 


8,025.00 


7,847.90 


177.10 


0.00 


177.10 






0.00 


9,317.00 


8,488.70 


828.30 


0.00 


828.30 


Town Manager 


Sal-Town Manager 


0.00 


122,393.00 


122,393.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


266,288.00 


266,288.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


0.00 


72,228.00 


33,821.56 


38,406.44 


32,362.71 


6,043.73 


Town Manager 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


9,360.00 


9,329.54 


30.46 


0.00 


30.46 






0.00 


470,269.00 


431,832.10 


38,436.90 


32,362.71 


6,074.19 


Town Accountant 


Sal-Town Accountant 


0.00 


95,712.00 


95,712.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


209,164.00 


209,164,00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Expenses 


19,945.70 


2,560.00 


2,882.09 


19,623.61 


19,623.61 


0.00 






19,945.70 


307,436.00 


307,758.09 


19,623.61 


19,623.61 


0.00 


Treas/Collector 


Sal-Treasurer/Collector 


0.00 


81,501.00 


81,501.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Collector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


143,726.00 


143,726.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Collector 


Expenses 


0.00 


22,100.00 


20,963.26 


1,136.74 


0.00 


1,136.74 


Treas/Collector 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Collector 


Amt. Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


0.00 


20,000.00 


15,072.08 


4,927.92 


0.00 


4,927.92 






0.00 


269,127.00 


263,062.34 


6,064.66 


0.00 


6,064.66 


Town Clerk 


Sal-Town Clerk 


0.00 


61,002.00 


61,002.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


101,546.00 


101,546.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Exnenses 


0.00 


2 925 00 


2 925 00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


300.00 


300.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


165,773.00 


165,773.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Sal-Prin. Assessor 


0.00 


93,149.00 


93,149.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


83,203.00 


78,756.03 


4,446.97 


0.00 


4,446.97 


Assessors 


Expenses 


9,303.84 


133,333.00 


116,674.85 


25,961.99 


21,597.39 


4,364.60 


Assessors 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






9,303.84 


309,685.00 


288,579.88 


30,408.96 


21,597.39 


8,811.57 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


22,542.00 


225,000.00 


234,044.38 


13,497.62 


0.00 


13,497.62 


Town Counsel 


Expenses 


240.06 


7,500.00 


6,601.76 


1,138.30 


0.00 


1,138.30 






22,782.06 


232,500.00 


240,646.14 


14,635.92 


0.00 


14,635.92 



-25- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 







CARRY FWD 


TRANSFER & 






CARRY FWD 




FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




TO FY 08 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


TO FY 09 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 07 


FISCAL 2008 


nO^AI OAAO 

FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FROM FY 08 


FISCAL 2008 


Pennanefit BW Com 


Salaries 


0.00 


450.00 


0.00 


450.00 


0.00 


450.00 


Pennanent BkJ Com 


Expenses 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


450,00 


0.00 


450,00 


0.00 


450.00 


General Government Subtotal 




52,031.60 


1,819,213.00 


1,753,251.64 


117,992,96 


73,583.71 


44,409.25 


PUBLIC SAFETY; 
















Police 


Sal -Chief 


0.00 


99,878,00 


99,878.00 


0,00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Dep. Chief 


0.00 


82,059.00 


82,059.00 


0,00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Lieut. 


0.00 


151,762.00 


147,537.91 


4,224,09 


0.00 


4,224.09 


Police 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


362,277.00 


362,277.00 


0,00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal -Patrolmen 


0.00 


1,839,295.00 


1,839,295.00 


0,00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Clerical 


0.00 


86,914.00 


86,914.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal.-Fill In Costs 


0.00 


395,000.00 


372,305.04 


22,694.96 


328.62 


22,366.34 


Police 


Sal.-Pd Holidays 


0.00 


104,586.00 


101,872.95 


2,713.05 


0.00 


2,713.05 


Police 


Sal-Specialist 


0.00 


12,350.00 


12,350.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Incentive 


0.00 


367,180.00 


367,032.90 


147.10 


0.00 


147.10 


Police 


Sal-Night Diff 


0.00 


37,440.00 


37,440.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


27,713.00 


23,207.35 


4,505.65 


0.00 


4,505.65 


Police 


Expenses 


8,913.70 


235,216.00 


208,298.23 


35,831.47 


30,638.55 


5,192.92 


Police 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






8,913.70 


3,801,670.00 


3,740,467.38 


70,116.32 


30,967.17 


39,149.15 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Chief 


0.00 


106,137.00 


106,137.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Dep. Chief 


0.00 


80,882.00 


75,134.88 


5,747.12 


0.00 


5,747.12 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Lieut. 


0.00 


380,244.00 


372,183.59 


8,060.41 


0.00 


8,060.41 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Privates 


0.00 


1,701,646.00 


1,679,889.26 


21,756.74 


0.00 


21,756.74 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Clerk/Disptch 


0.00 


47,545.00 


47,545.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Part Time 


0.00 


16,250.00 


13,584.00 


2,666.00 


0.00 


2,666.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Overtime Costs 


0.00 


435,000.00 


432,204.14 


2,795.86 


0.00 


2,795.86 


Fire Dept 


Sal.-Pd.Holidays 


0.00 


117,832.00 


115,718.26 


2,113.74 


0.00 


2,113.74 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-lncentive/EMT 


0.00 


11,025.00 


11,025.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept 


Sal. -Fire Alarm 


0.00 


14,420.00 


14,420.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


30,778.00 


28,757.89 


2,020.11 


0.00 


2,020.11 


Fire Dept 


Expenses 


22.00 


107,354.00 


100,900.16 


6,475.84 


2,846.22 


3,629.62 


Fire Dept. 


Furnish & Equip. 


4,000.00 


9,754.00 


9,772.00 


3,982.00 


3,982.00 


0.00 






4,022.00 


3,058,867.00 


3,007,271.18 


55,617.82 


6,828.22 


48,789,60 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Salaries Full Time 


0.00 


427,310.00 


435,144.97 


(7,834.97) 


0.00 


(7,834.97) 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Salaries Overtime 


0.00 


52,500.00 


44,665.03 


7,834.97 


0.00 


7,834.97 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Salaries Part Time 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Expenses 


15,000.00 


22,050.00 


15,659.05 


21,390.95 


0.00 


21,390.95 


Public Safety Central Dispatch 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


19,000.00 


18,730.83 


269.17 


0.00 


A AA 

0.00 


15,000.00 


520,860.00 


514,199.88 


21,660.12 


0.00 


f\A OAA AC 

21,390.95 


Animal Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


34,320.00 


34,320.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,325.00 


2,011.32 


313.68 


0.00 


313.68 






0.00 


36,645.00 


36,331.32 


313.68 


0.00 


313.68 


Public Safety Subtotal 




27,935.70 


7,418,042.00 


7,298,269.76 


147,707.94 


37,795.39 


109,643.38 


PUBLIC WORKS: 
















Engineenng 


Salaries 


0.00 


169,632.00 


166,806.24 


2,825.76 


0.00 


2,825.76 


Engineering 


Salaries Pari Time 


0.00 


11,490.00 


9,920.00 


1,570.00 


0.00 


1,570.00 



-26- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 







CARRY FWD 


TRANSFER & 






CARRY FWD 




FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




TO FY 08 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


TO FY 09 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 07 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FROM FY 08 


FISCAL 2008 


Engineering 


Expenses 


0.00 


9,200.00 


8,559.31 


640.69 


0.00 


640.69 




0.00 


190,322.00 


185,285.55 


5,036.45 


0.00 


5,036.45 


Highway Division 


Sal-D.P.W. Supt. 


0.00 


95.754.00 


95,754.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Division 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


1,161,707.00 


1,140,400.49 


21,306.51 


0.00 


21,306.51 


Highway Division 


oireain Maini. oai. 


u.uu 


in Rfln nn 


1 n Aftn nn 


n nn 


n nn 

U.Uu 


n nn 
u.uu 


Highway Division 


Stream Maint. Exp. 


0.00 


1,000.00 


895.50 


104.50 


0.00 


104.50 


Highway Division 


Expenses 


1,898.10 


302,900.00 


287,251.46 


17,546.64 


404.94 


17,141.70 


Highway Division 


Road Machinery Exp. 


0.00 


80,000.00 


77,647.18 


2,352.82 


941.50 


1,411.32 


Highway Division 


ruei & utner 


u.uu 


iin Kin nn 




yo4.M 


n nn 
U.UU 




Highway Division 


Drainage Projects 


0.00 


55,000.00 


54,693.82 


306.18 


0.00 


306.18 


Highway Division 


Public Street Lights 


0.00 


224,800.00 


224,800.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


HinhwAv niui^inn 


Furnish & Ecjuip. 


0.00 


23,200.00 


21,609.34 


1,590.66 


0.00 


1,590.66 




1,898.10 


2,285,751.00 


2,243,487.06 


44,162.04 


1,346.44 


42,815.60 


Snow & ice Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


202,927.00 


202,927.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


j^nnw A Irp Hnntrnl 


Pvnonses 


0.00 


418,820.00 


416 912 80 


1,907.20 


247.00 


1 660 20 






0.00 


621,747.00 


619,839.80 


1,907.20 


247.00 


1,660.20 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


61,798.02 


1,644,072.00 


1,640,978.19 


64,891.83 


64,891.83 


0.00 






fi1 7Qfl 09 




1 RAO Q7ft 1Q 


Dn,057 1 .00 




n nn 
u.uu 


Tree Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


180,177.00 


151,387.84 


28,789.16 


0.00 


28,789.16 


Tree Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


10,500.00 


10,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




n nn 

u.uu 


iQn fi77 nn 

iI7U,Df / .UU 


1fi1 ftft7 RA 
Ivj 1 ,00i .On 


OR 7ftQ 1fi 

£.0, 1 03. 10 


n nn 

U.uu 


5ft 7fttJ 1fi 

£.0, 1 03. 10 


Parks & Grounds Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


343,302.00 


342,108.15 


1,193.85 


0.00 


1,193.85 


Parks & Grounds Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


43,000.00 


40,990.96 


2,009.04 


0.00 


2,009.04 




0.00 


386,302.00 


383,099.11 


3,202.89 


0.00 


3,202.89 


Cennetery Division 


Salaries 


0.00 


142,204.00 


138,974.03 


3,229.97 


0.00 


3,229.97 


Cemetery Division 


Expenses 


0.00 


17,750.00 


17,117.13 


632.87 


0.00 


632.87 






0.00 


159,954.00 


156,091.16 


3,862.84 


0.00 


3,862.84 


Sewer 


Salaries 


0.00 


65,900.00 


65,900.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Sewer 


Expenses 


24,692.74 


80,630.00 


57,773.10 


47,549.64 


39,397.21 


8,152.43 


Sewer Subtotal 




24,692.74 


146,530.00 


123,673.10 


47,549.64 


39,397.21 


8,152.43 


Total Public Works 




00 000 OR 


3,0^3,j00.UU 


0,0 14, M I.O 1 


1QQ Ar\o nc^ 
iyy,'»u/.uo 


1U0,oo^.'Jo 


30,J 19. Of 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 
















Board of Health 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


75,979.00 


75,979.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Board of Health 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


158,091.00 


158,091.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Board of Health 


Expenses 


0.00 


10,180.00 


8,845.72 


1,334.28 


187.94 


1,146.34 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 


0.00 


33,872.00 


33,872.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0,00 


Board of Health 


Furnish. & Equip. 


533.25 


300.00 


832.74 


O.fel 


0.00 


0,51 






533.25 


278,422.00 


277,620.46 


1,334.79 


187.94 


1,146,85 


Seaier/Wts & Meas. 


Salaries 


0.00 


5,166.00 


3,874.50 


1,291.50 


0.00 


1,291.50 


Sealer/Wts & Meas. 


Sm. Tools & Equip. 


0.00 


200.00 


69.50 


130.50 


0.00 


130.50 






0.00 


5,366.00 


3,944.00 


1,422.00 


0.00 


1,422.00 



-27- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 







CARRY FWD 


TRANSFER & 






CARRY FWD 




FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




TO FY 08 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


TO FY 09 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 07 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FROM FY 08 


FISCAL 2008 


Planning/Conserv. 


Sal-Director 


0.00 


72,996.00 


72,996.00 


0,00 


0.00 


0.00 


Ptanning/Conserv. 


Salanes-Ottier 


0.00 


193,885.00 


191,972.48 


1,912.52 


0.00 


1,912.52 


Ptanning/Consefv. 


Expenses 


800.00 


9,925.00 


6,690.18 


4,034.82 


828.72 


3,206.10 


Planning/Consefv 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


2,000.00 


1,835.92 


164.08 


0.00 


164.08 






800.00 


278,806.00 


273,494.58 


6,111.42 


828.72 


5,282.70 


BkJg Inspector 


Sal-Bldg Inspector 


0.00 


71,909.00 


71,909.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Bklg. Inspector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


106,719.00 


101,025.42 


5,693.58 


0.00 


5,693.58 


BkJg Inspector 


Expenses 


0.00 


4,455.00 


3,864.46 


590.54 


79.52 


511.02 


BIdg Inspector 


Fumish. & Equip. 


533.25 


0.00 


533.25 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




533.25 


183,083.00 


177,332.13 


6,284.12 


79.52 


AAjI a a 

6,204.60 


Community Development Subtotal 




1,866.50 


745,677.00 


732,391.17 


15,152.33 


1,096.18 


14,056.15 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS; 
















Public Buildings 


Sal-Super. 


0.00 


106,137.00 


106,137.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


2,187,577.00 


2,145,603.22 


41,973.78 


0.00 


41,973.78 


Public Buildings 


Expenses-Town BIdg 


0.00 


155,610.00 


153,738.05 


1,871.95 


1,946.34 


(74.39) 


Public Buildings 


Electric-Town BIdgs. 


0.00 


180,000.00 


180,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Utilities-Town BIdgs. 


0.00 


100,000.00 


95,585.60 


4,414.40 


0.00 


4,414.40 


Public Buildings 


Expenses School BIdg 


496.96 


187,000.00 


187,022.84 


474.12 


0.00 


474.12 


Public Buildings 


Training & Conference 


0.00 


385.00 


378.48 


6.52 


0.00 


6.52 


Public Buildings 


Fuel Heating 


0.00 


1,060,000.00 


997,338.32 


62,661.68 


62,661.68 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Asbestos Repair 


0.00 


5,000.00 


600.00 


4,400.00 


0.00 


4,400.00 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


9,000.00 


5,501.92 


3,498.08 


0.00 


3,498.08 


Public Buildings 


HVAC Repairs 


0.00 


65,000.00 


59,684.27 


5,315.73 


0.00 


5,315.73 


Public Buildings 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






496.96 


A ACC TAA AA 

4,055,709.00 


1 Al-l COA "7A 

3,931,589.70 


124,616.26 


A jl AAO AA 

64,608.02 


f>f\ AAO A jl 

60,008.24 


Public Buildings Subtotal 




496.96 


4,055,709.00 


3,931,589.70 


124,616.26 


64,608.02 


60,008.24 


HUMAN SERVICES: 
















Veterans 


Salary 


0.00 


j| A AO ■< AA 

46,031.00 


AO<( AA 

46,031.00 


0.00 


0.00 


A AA 

0.00 


Veterans 


Expenses 


0.00 


1,225.00 


703.74 


521.26 


0.00 


521.26 


Veterans 


Assistance 


0.00 


200,000.00 


192,646.66 


7,353.34 


0.00 


7,353.34 






n nn 






7 ft74 fif) 


n no 


7 fl74 fin 

1 ,0 1 H.UU 


UDiary 


Salary-Director 


n nn 

u.uu 


Q7Q nn 


7c Q7Q nn 


n nn 
u.uu 


n nn 
u.uu 


n nn 
u.uu 


Library 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


605,804.00 


602,533.30 


3,270.70 


0.00 


3,270.70 


Library 


Expenses 


0.00 


139,405.00 


139,336.22 


68.78 


0.00 


68.78 


Library 


M.V.L.C. 


0.00 


33,189.00 


33,189.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Library 


Fumish & Equip. 


0.00 


23,466.00 


23,466.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


877,843.00 


874,503.52 


3,339.48 


0.00 


3,339.48 


Recreation 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


61,649.00 


61,649.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Reaeation 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


39,281.00 


39,281.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Recreation 


Expenses 


0.00 


6,500.00 


6,472.12 


27.88 


0.00 


27.88 


Recreation 


Fumish & Equip. 


0.00 


200.00 


200.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


107,630.00 


107,602.12 


27.88 


0.00 


27.88 


Elderly Services 


Salary-Director 


0.00 


60,340.00 


60,340.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elderly Services 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


83,252.00 


83,252.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elderty Services 


Expenses 


0.00 


37,540.00 


34,035.69 


3,504.31 


0.00 


3,504.31 


0.00 


181,132.00 


177,627.69 


3,504.31 


0.00 


3,504.31 



-28- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 







CARRY FWD 


TRANSFER & 






CARRY FWD 




FUNCTION/ACTIVITY 




TO FY 08 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


TO FY 09 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 07 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FROM FY 08 


FISCAL 2008 


Historical Comm. 


Salaries 


0.00 


15,274.00 


15,206.55 


67.45 


0.00 


67.45 


Historical Comm. 


Expenses 


2,202.34 


6,750.00 


7,496.80 


1,455.54 


1,455.54 


0.00 


Historical Comm. 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


2,000.00 


0.00 


A AAA AA 

2,000.00 


A AAA AA 

2,000.00 


0.00 






2,202.34 


24,024.00 


22,703.35 


3,522.99 


3,455.54 


67.45 


Com on Disabilities 


Salaries 


0.00 


200.00 


0.00 


200.00 


0.00 


200.00 


Com on Disabilities 


Expenses 


0.00 


300.00 


0.00 


300.00 


0.00 


300.00 






0.00 


500.00 


0.00 


500.00 


0.00 


500.00 


Human Services Subtotal 




2,202.34 


1,438,385.00 


1,421,818.08 


18,769.26 


3,455.54 


15,313.72 


EDUCATION: 
















School Dept. 


Salaries 


0.00 


21,463,258.00 


21,361,107.00 


102,151.00 


102,151.00 


0.00 


School Dept. 


Expenses 


388,803.75 


5,566,191.00 


C ^ it f\ AO/* ^T 

5,610,936.67 


344,058.08 


n A A nm nn 

344,058.08 


0.00 






388,803.75 


27,029,449.00 


26,972,043.67 


446,209.08 


446,209.08 


0.00 


Regional Vocational 


Shawsheen Vocational 


0.00 


3,436,269.00 


3,436,269.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


3,436,269.00 


3,436,269.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Education Subtotal 




388,803.75 


30,465,718.00 


30,408,312.67 


446,209.08 


446,209.08 


0.00 


DEBT SERVICE: 
















Debt & Interest 


Schools 


0.00 


3,037,525.00 


3,037,525.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Gen. Government 


0.00 


1,038,752.00 


1,038,752.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Sewer 


0.00 


168,348.00 


168,348.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Water 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest 


Auth. Fees & Misc. 


0.00 


C AAA AA 

5,000.00 


4 COA CA 

1,589.50 


'i A Af\ CA 

3,410.50 


A AA 

0.00 


O A 4f\ CA 

3,410.50 






0.00 


A OjIA ffOC AA 

4,249,625.00 


4,246,214.50 


3,410.50 


0.00 


3,410.50 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 




0.00 


4,249,625.00 


4,246,214.50 


3,410.50 


0.00 


3,410.50 


Insurance & Bonds 




0.00 


567,350.00 


551,190.32 


16,159.68 


0.00 


16,159.68 


Employee Health & Life Insurance 




298,112.63 


6,700,833.72 


6,998,946.35 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Veterans' Retirement 




0.00 


13,008.00 


13,008.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 




0.00 


61,500.00 


56,750.15 


4,749.85 


0.00 


4,749.85 


Medicare Employers' Contr. 




0.00 


450,000.00 


450,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 




0.00 


90,000.00 


89,750.99 


249.01 


0.00 


249.01 


Local Trans/Training Conf. 




0.00 


5,000.00 


2,357.73 


2,642.27 


0.00 


2,642.27 


Out of State Travel 




0.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


1,500.00 


0.00 


1,500.00 


Computer Hdwe/Sftwe Maint. & Expenses 


0.00 


85,000.00 


55,257.62 


29,742.38 


29,742.38 


0.00 


Annual Audit 




0.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Ambulance Billing 




0.00 


25,000.00 


21,833.16 


3,166.84 


0.00 


3,166.84 


Town Report 




0.00 


10,000.00 


8,126.20 


1,873.80 


0.00 


1,873.80 


Professional & Technical Services 




101,383.18 


50,000.00 


50,604.83 


100,778.35 


100,778.35 


0.00 


Reserve Fund 




0.00 


18,077.00 


0.00 


A A A**'9 nn 

18,077.00 


0.00 


A n AA 

18,077.00 


Unclassified Subtotal 




399,495.81 


8,097,268.72 


8,317,825.35 


178,939.18 


130,520.73 


48,418.45 


Current Year Overlay 




0.00 


700,000.00 


0.00 


700,000.00 


0.00 


700,000.00 


Retirement Contributions 




0.00 


3,200,477.00 


3,200,477.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Offset Items 




0.00 


44,233.00 


0.00 


44,233.00 


0.00 


44,233.00 


Special Education 




0.00 


0.00 


301.00 


(301.00) 


0.00 


(301.00) 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 




0.00 


432,304.00 


432,304.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 




0.00 


6,217.00 


6,217.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



-29- 



TOWN Or WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSEHS 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 







CARRY FWD 


TRANSFER & 






CARRY FWD 




FUNCTIONyACTIVlTY 




TO FY 08 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDITURES 


BALANCE 


TO FY 09 


CLOSE 






FROM FY 07 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FISCAL 2008 


FROM FY 08 


FISCAL 2008 


RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 




0.00 


16,060.00 


16,140.00 


(80.00) 


0.00 


(80.00) 


Metro Air Poll Cont Dist 




0.00 


6,394.00 


6,394.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Stosquito Control Program 




0.00 


45,166.00 


45,906.00 


(740.00) 


0.00 


(740.00) 


MWRA Sewer Assessment 




0.00 


1,815,075.00 


A ICQ -1 CC\ (\f\ 

1,768,169.00 


AC (\r\c f\i\ 

46,906.00 


0.00 


AC f\f\c nn 

46,906.00 


Lnarier ocnoois 




n nn 


OZ,/OO.UU 


M, 400.1)1) 


/H (^7fl AA\ 

^01, 0(0.1)1); 


A AA 
U.UU 


/01 C7Q AA\ 
(Jl ,0/0. UU) 


Odium ^iimvc 




U.UU 


n nn 

U.UU 


9n 'inn nn 


ron snn nn\ 


n nn 

U.UU 


/on cnn nn^ 


Pnminal lii^tiri^ Traininn 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Essex Coonty Tech Institute 




0.00 


12,493.00 


12,493.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


^tatiitiw Phamoc ^iihtntal 
oiaiuimy v./Maiuc9 ouuiuiai 






fi HI 707 on 


J, J / J,OU / .uu 


717 (un nn 


n nn 

U.UU 


Tu Adn nn 

1 01 ,o^u.uu 


Unclassified 


MemorialA/ets Day 


1,583.99 


5,500.00 


6,961.35 


122.64 


0.00 


122.64 


Unclassified 


Lease of Quarters 


750.00 


1,500.00 


2,250.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Unclassified 


Storm Water Mgmt Plan 


13,649,90 


0.00 


0.00 


13,649.90 


13,649.90 


0.00 


Unclassified 


Senior Tax Rebate Prog. 


2,463.49 


12,800.00 


10,059.00 


5,204.49 


5,204.49 


0.00 


Unclassified 


Site Cleanup Abigail Island 


18,460.39 


0.00 


14,639.86 


3,820.53 


3,820.53 


0.00 




F;^pilitv NpAfiQ ^tiifiv 
r o\jttny oiuuy 




0.00 




58 761 67 


58 761 67 


n on 


1 InrJa^cifipri 

U 1 lUtOdO 1 1 1 cu 


HrainAnp Ma^tpr Planiil 

LyiOIIIOUC IVIaOlCI n lal Iff 1 


3,214.03 


89 000 00 


15 10? fi? 


77,111.41 


77,111.41 


nn 

U.UU 


lAyorr^nt Arti^loe CiiKtAtal 
Wdndni MiUCieS oUDlOidl 


ICC ^')^ on 


inR Ann no 


in*; ifi 


ICO C7n PA 
1 00,01 U.D4 


1 JO, JnO.UU 


109 
l^^.u** 


Police 


Cruisers 


0.00 


143,645.00 


143,282.45 


362.55 


0.00 


362.55 


Police 


Computer Aided Dispatch 


0.00 


69,176.00 


63,729.43 


5,446.57 


0.00 


5,446.57 


rire 


Ambulance 


o,oUU.UU 


A Art 
U.UU 


OCC OQ 
0,,dOD.30 


A'i AO 

40.1)/! 


A AA 

U.UU 


A'i AO 


Public Works 


Library Parking Lot Improve 


0.00 


77,000.00 


31,230.37 


45,769.63 


45,769.63 


0.00 


Public Works 


Construction/Maint Vehicles 


0.00 


250,000.00 


247,528.05 


2,471.95 


0.00 


2,471.95 


Public Worics 


One Ton Dump Truck 


0.00 


57,000.00 


56,482.00 


518.00 


0.00 


518.00 


Public Works 


Cemetery Expansion 


50,005.64 


0.00 


10,493.08 


39,512.56 


39,512.56 


0.00 


Public Buildings 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


130,130.00 


59,721.00 


70,409.00 


70,409.00 


0.00 


School 


Burner Replacement 


0.00 


120,000.00 


109,000.00 


11,000.00 


11,000.00 


0.00 


School 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


55,000.00 


42,700.00 


12,300.00 


0.00 


12,300.00 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 




58,305.64 


901,951.00 


772,423.36 


187,833.28 


166,691.19 


21,142.09 


GRAND TOTAL 




1,174,648.96 


71,236,950.72 


70,075,056.20 


2,336,543.48 


1,188,390.32 


1,147,883.99 



-30- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 





Actual Fiscal 


Actual Fiscal 


Actual Fiscal 


Actual Fiscal 


REVENUES' 


2005 


2006 




2007 


2008 


Water Receivables Rates 


2,833,982.82 


3,020,256 


92 


3,067,949.93 


3,333,286.83 


Water Receivables Services 


22,465.11 


32,817 


48 


12,217.88 


23,682.75 


Water Receivables Industrial 


85,188.76 


19,706 


65 


17,182.69 


27,905.40 


Water Receivables Connections 


89,822.47 


54 926 


50 


49,528.95 


76,041.06 


waier Keceivaoies rire rroieciion 


OU, 1/1.4/ 


52,057 


99 


I^A nK7 OR 


AA7 ncQ Kn 
44/ ,Udo.0U 


Water Receivables Cross Connections 


30,067.94 


?6 709 


30 


29,995.00 


32,427.50 


waier Liens 


izy,ooz.oo 


106,025 


19 


IOC CQ-1 QA 


10 1,03^.00 


Special Assessments 


435.95 





00 


0.00 


0.00 


Property Rentals 


76,199.04 


106,928 


99 


0.00 


0.00 


Mlscfillaneoijs 


20 202 29 


132,285 


56 


4 418 212 56 


69 994 78 


Reimbursements 


7,594.95 




Q5 


4,829.05 


0.00 


Total Revenue 


3,345,663.66 


3,569,935 


53 


7,779,565.26 


4,161,999.65 


Operating Costs 


2,485,048.30 


3,535,119 


18 


4,135,190.05 


5,400,466.12 


1 oiai uperaiing l-osis 


Z,4DD,U4o.0U 


3,535,119 


18 


4, 100, lyu.uo 


c; Ann arr io 

0,4UU,4D0. 1/1 


Excess Revenues over Operating Costs 


860,615.36 


34,816 


35 


3,644,375.21 


(1,238,466.47) 


Transfer to General Fund for Debt Service, 












Employees Benefits and Allocated Charges 


493,508.00 


559,312 


00 


610,580.00 


648,778.00 


Excess of Expenditures and 












Transfers over Revenues 


367,107.36 


(524,495 


65) 


3,033,795.21 


(1,887,244.47) 


Total Fund Balance - Beginning 


2,069,584.11 


2,436,691 


47 


1,912,195.82 


4,945,991.03 


Total Fund Balance - Ending 


2,436,691.47 


1,912,195 


82 


4,945,991.03 


3,058,746.56 



-31- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2008 



Main Street Middle School 
Sewer Project 
4/22/89 4/26/97 



Public Safety 
Building 
4/26/97 

7,986,000 



0.00 
(121.812.80) 
0.00 (121,812.80) 



0.00 (121,812.80) 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 



Town Meeting Dates 

Initial Project Authorization 747,000 24,300,000 
REVENUES: 

Intergovernmental 0.00 0.00 

Total Revenue 0.00 0.00 

EXPENDITURES; 
Capital Outlay 

Total Expenditures 0.00 0^ 

Excess of revenues over/under 

expenditures 0.00 0.00 

Other Financial Sources(uses): 

Retirement of Bond Anticipation Notes 0.00 0.00 
Proceeds of General 

Obligation Bonds & Notes 0.00 
Operating Transfers 0.00 
Other Financial Sources/Uses 

Excess of revenues 
and other sources over 
(under) expenditures and 

otfier uses 

FUND BALANCE JULY 1,2007 56,000.60 121,812.80 3,615.92 



High School 
Renovation 
4/21/01 

975,000 



0.00 



0.00 

0.00 

0.00 
0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



Total 
(Memorandum 
Only) 



34,088,000 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 



0.00 

(3,278.66) (125,091.46) 
(3,278.66) (125,091.46) 



(3,278.66) (125,091.46) 
3,278.66 184,707.98 



FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 2008 56,000.60 Om 3,615.92 OOO 59,616.52 



-32- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2008 



DESCRIPTION 


YEAR 
ISSUE 


YEAR 
DUE 


RATE 


ORIGINAL 
PRINCIPAL 
AMOUNT 


PRINCIPAL 
OUTSTANDING 
JUNE 30, 2007 


BOND 
ADDITIONS 


PRINCIPAL 
RETIREMENTS 


PRINCIPAL 
OUTSTANDING 
JUNE 30, 2008 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 


















Comprehensive Middle 
School 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


24,300,000 


9,734,000 





2,427,500 


7,306,500 


High School Renovation 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


975,000 


390,000 





97,500 


292,500 


Public Safety Building 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


5,986,000 


2,386,000 





600,000 


1,786,000 


Public Safety Building 
General Government Land 
Purchase 


06/2001 
12/2005 


06/2011 
06/2011 


4.5-5.0 
3.9 


2,000,000 



800,000 
268,000 






200,000 
67,000 


600,000 
201.000 


Main Street Sewer Project 


06/2001 


06/2011 


4.5-5.0 


985,000 


385,000 





100,000 


285,000 


MWPAT (Title 5 Septic) 
MWRA Collateral 
Agreement 


Various 
02/2003 


02/2011 




400,000 
119,350 


355,514 
100,320 






25,080 
25,080 


330,434 
75,240 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 








34,765,350 


14,418,834 





3,542,160 


10,876,674 



-33- 



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i 

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C3 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Fire Department 

It IS with gveat pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the operations, activities and 
accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department for the year 2008. Chief Daniel R. Stewart and 
Lieutenant Christopher J. Nee retired from the Fire Department. Fire Fighters Anthony J. Adamczyk, 
Jacob H. Gronemeyer, Keith E. Kelly, Jason M. Kennedy, Rann R. Tingtella and Robert W. Varey III 
were appointed to the department. All new recruits graduated from the Massachusetts Fire Fighting 
Academy 12 week recruit program. 



The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, six Lieutenants, thirty-three fire fighters, one 
full-time clerk and one part-time clerk. The following roster is provided: 

Fire Chief 

Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edmund J. Corcoran, III 

Lieutenants 

John Brown, Jr. 
Gary J. Donovan 
Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Richard T. McCleUan 
Joseph T. McMahon 
Gary P. Robichaud 

Clerks 

Linda K. DeMole 
Isabel E. Raschella - Part-Time 




Town Clerk Sharon George swears in 
Edward Bradbury as Fire Chief. 



Anthony J. Adamczyk 
Brian D. Anderson 
George A. Anderson, Jr. 
George A. Anderson, III 
Thomas C. Casella 
WLLliam F. Cavanaugh 
Thomas W. Ceres 
Walter R. Daley 
David R. Feyler 
Kenneth P. Gray 
Eric M. Gronemeyer 



Fire Fighters 

Jacob H. Gronemeyer 
WnUam J. Herrick, Jr. 
Richard J. Hughes 
Keith E. KeUy 
Jason M. Kennedy 
Andrew W. Leverone 
John F. McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Michael J. McManus 
Eric J. Nansel 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 



Christopher G. Pozzi 
Eric S. Robbins 
Frederick J. Ryan 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Rann R. Tingtella 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert W. Varey, III 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 





Deputy Fire Chief tkimund Corcoran and 
Fire Lieutenants Richard McClellan and 
Gary Donovan are sworn in to their new positions. 



Fire Fighters Michael McManus, 
Jason Kennedy and Rann Tingtella are sworn 
in by Town Clerk Sharon George. 



-36- 



The department responded to a total of 3,233 calls during 2008. 



Residential Buildings 


4 


False Alarms 


156 


Residential (Other) 


4 


Ambulance/RescuesAV ater 


1,862 


Commercial Structures 


Q 

o 


Service Calls 




Commercial (Other) 





Carbon Monoxide Detectors 


44 


Chimney, Fireplaces & 




Haz Mat 


2 


Woodburning Stoves 


5 






Vehicles 


21 


Out of Town Assistance 


123 


Brush, Grass or Rubbish 


50 


Haz Mat 


u 


Dumpsters 


3 


Fire 


97 


Inspections 


622 


Ambulance/Rescue 


yo 


Estimated value of property endangered was $11,470,000. Estimated property loss $488,500. 




The following is a Ust of permits issued: 








Black Powder 


2 


Propane 


59 


Blasting 


3 


Smoke Detector 


I/O 


Class C Explosive 





Tank 


59 


Fire Alarm 


61 


Miscellaneous 


9 


Flammable Liquid 


16 


Sprinkler 


62 


Oil Burner 


147 


Gas Stations 





Truck 


42 


Reports 


35 


Welding 


5 


Carnival 


1 


Plan Review 


71 


Suppression 


5 






TOTAL 


755 



As required by law, the Fire Prevention Bureau under the direction of Lt. Daniel Hurley inspected all 
schools, pubhc buildings, nursing homes and flammable storage facihties. Other inspections Usted 
below: 



New Residential Plans Review 31 

New Residential Fire Inspections 61 

New Industrial Plans Review 40 

Fire Inspection Industrial/Commercial 40 

Underground Tank Removals 7 

Underground Tank Installations 

Aboveground Tank Removals 52 

OU Burner/ Tank 147 

Propane 59 

Nursing Home Inspections 8 

Gas Station Inspections 11 



Shift personnel inspected 282 residential/commercial properties for smoke and carbon monoxide 
detectors in compliance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 148, Section 26F. 

Classrooms at all of the public schools grades K-5 have received instruction on fire safety by 
Lieutenant Daniel Hurley. The Safe Grant was funded and allowed for the continuation of fire 
safety education in the schools. Fire Fighters Thomas Ceres, Christopher Pozzi, Frederick Ryan, Eric 
Nansel, William Cavanaugh, Robert Patrie and Lt. Richard McClellan instructed students in fire 
safety. Seniors at the Senior Center also received instruction on fire safety. 

The municipal fire alarm division personnel are Deputy Chief Edmund Corcoran and Fire Fighter 
David Feyler. Their mission is to maintain and expand the Municipal Fire Alarm System/Keltron 
Digital Communicator to provide fire alarm signal transmission from the protected properties back 
to the Public Safety Dispatch Center. These alarm systems are installed in new and existing 
buildings. They are the quickest and most reliable way to transmit a fire alarm signal directly to the 
Fire Department. 



-37- 



Two hundred forty-seven master boxes, sixteen street boxes and twenty-five miles of wire currently 
make up the six circuits. All circuits and boxes are in good working order and all repairs due to 
weather rehited incidents or motor vehicles hitting utility poles have been corrected or are in the 
process of being corrected at the time of this report. 

New Master Boxes installed in 2008: 

1213 Bank of America, 390 Main Street 

1214 Realty Trust. 36 Middlesex Avenue 

1235 Wilmington Crossing (Staples), 221-241 Main Street 

1236 Wihnington Crossing (Starbucks), 251 & 253 Main Street 

1238 Wilmington Crossing (Near Cumberland), 209-219 Main Street 

1239 Danvers Bank, 247 Main Street 
1241 Sovereign Bank, 280 Main Street 
1244 CVS. 222 Main Street 

3153 Paul's Landscaping, 911 Main Street 

3372 Regency Place, Horseshoe Lane 

6366 Charles River, 251 Ballardvale Street, Building 20 

New Keltron Digital Dialers installed in 2008: 

63 Charles River, 251 Ballardvale Street, Building 20 

64 Wilmington Crossing (Staples), 221-241 Main Street 

65 Wilmington Crossing (Starbucks), 251 & 253 Main Street 

66 Wihnington Crossing 209-219 Main Street 

67 One Jewell Drive 

68 Bank of America, 390 Main Street 

70 Regency Place, Horseshoe Lane 

71 CVS, 222 Main Street 

72 265 Ballardvale Street 

73 Danvers Bank, 247 Main Street 

74 Sovereign Bank, 280 Main Street 

75 Realty Trust, 36 Middlesex Avenue 

76 Paul's Landscaping, 911 Main Street 

77 Regency Place, Horseshoe Lane 

78 Ametek, 60 Fordham Road 

I wish to extend my sincere appreciation to all members for their continued dedication and 
professionalism serving the residents of the town. Sincere appreciation is also extended to aU the 
members of the PoUce and Dispatch Departments for your efforts. 

As always, 1 would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff. Assistant Town Manager, 
Department Heads, the Board of Selectmen and the many organizations for their assistance during 
the past year. 




- '■ 

P(jlice and Fire Department Honor Guards 
lead the Memorial Day parade. 



-38- 



Police Departmeet 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby respectfully submit the annual 
report on the activities of the WUmington PoHce Department for the year 2008. 

The organization of staff in the Wilmington Pohce Department has changed according to funded 
levels approved in last year's annual Town Meeting. With the funding of the two additional 
Lieutenants positions we have been able to move forward in two vital administrative functions that 
will enhance our abiUty to provide services to the community. One Ueutenant has been assigned to 
oversee our emergency management preparedness planning and training functions within the 
Department. Our Emergency Planning Division works closely with members of the Wilmington Fire 
Department and several State and Federal agencies as we coordinate our response plans in the event 
of an emergency. Great attention to detail in preparing our comprehensive public seifety response is 
the key to successful deployment of resources in the event they are needed. Post 9-11 procedure 
requires regional collaborative effort to bring the necessary response to bear on planned and 
unplanned events. Many contingency plans are being developed using best practices in our response 
to these planned and unplanned events both natural and manmade. The training function of our 
department goes hand in hand with our response planning. After plans, policies and best practices 
are developed the Department must train officers and support staff to follow the plans as they are 
placed into operation. We foresee the need for this division to continue as we update our response 
plans and train to new levels. The second additional Lieutenant position will be assigned the 
responsibility of moving the Department toward certification and accreditation under the 
Massachusetts Standards. The Department is always adapting to new laws which govern its 
operation. As changes in these legal precedents take effect we must tailor our policies and 
procedures to adhere the standards set in those decisions. The standardization of our procedures 
ensures equal and measured responses to incidents we are asked to address on a daily basis. Along 
with these promotions we hired two new patrolmen to the force. Officer Michael Patterson comes 
from a distinguished family of law enforcement professionals and completed his academy and field 
training late in December. Officer Brian Thornton was hired in November and came to us by way of 
a lateral transfer. He was previously employed in the City of Revere and employed as a PoUce 
Officer assigned to their Gang Unit. Both officers are certified and assigned to the midnight to 8 
a.m. patrol shifts. 

As presented in past reports, the Department continues to actively pursue partnerships with other 
agencies and departments within our community and throughout the nation. We beheve our best 
opportunities for success are through shared resources and information. We partner with many 
agencies that are not directly involved in law enforcement on a daily basis. One of our most 
cherished partnerships is with our elderly community at the Senior Center and the residents of 
Doming Way. Officers spend many hours listening, sharing time and helping as volunteers in an 
effort to support and protect this most 
precious segment of our community. We 
continued our partnerships with the 
Wilmington and Shawsheen School 
Districts. We are committed to 
maintaining a presence in the schools 
through our School Resource Officers, 
DARE and Safety programs. We 
participate in the Wilmington Schools 
Evacuation Planning meetings and 
provide assistance and advice as needed. 
We collaborate with the schools and the 
Middlesex District Attorney's office in 

their Community Base Justice Programs ^t. Brian Pupa and Chief Michael Begonis 

helping troubled youth receive the ^^^""^^ J«hn Delorey who was honored 

guidance and resources they need to make ^" ^^^^^ f^"" commitment 

better decisions as they move forward to ^o enforcmg impaired dnver laws, 

adulthood. 




-39- 



The Department wishes to recognize the staff at the WUmington Pubhc Safety Dispatch who assist 
the Pohce Department in successfully completing each mission and call for service. The men and 
women of our Public Safety Dispatch division are the unsung heroes in many of our most trying but 
successful endeavors. They stand beside us in the front line of service to our community in times of 
its most pressing need. Their commitment to our community is unparalleled in their profession and 
we truly would not be as successful as we are today without their steadfast dedication. 

The Department has moved forward on the installation of the new radio system appropriated at last 
year s Town Meeting. We expect a late January 2009 completion date for this project. Upon 
completion of this digital/analog system we will have moved dramatically closer to our goal of 
Interoperability and Federal compliance initiatives. With this new system we will maintain 
redundancy in communications allowing us the ability to maintain radio communications when 
components of the system fail or are inoperable. 

The following was the Departmental Roster of Personnel for most of 2008: 

Chief of Police 

Michael R. Begonis 

Deputy Police Chief 

Robert V. Richter 

Lieutenants 

Joseph A. Desmond, Operations/Grants 
J. Christopher Neville, Detective 
Brian T. Pupa, Accreditation and Policy Development 
Scott A. Sencabaugh, Emergency Planning/Training 

Sergeants 

Christopher J. Ahem Charles R. Fiore 

David L. Axelrod David M. McCue, Jr. 

David J. Bradbury Daniel E. Murray 

Detectives and Specialists 

John M. Bossi, Narcotics 
Julie M. Brisbois, DARE 
Chester A. Bruce, III, School Resource 
Brian T. Hermann, School Resource 
Patrick J. King, Juvenile/Sex 
Thomas A. Miller, Inspector 
Brian M. Moon, Safety Officer 
Patrick B. Nally, Inspector 
David A. Sugrue, Inspector 
Brian J. Stickney, Inspector 
James R. White, Court/Inspector 



Ronald J. Alpers, Jr. 
Dan C. Cadigan 
Paul R. Chalifour 
John W. Delorey 
Daniel P. D'Eon 
Christopher J. Dindo 
Richard A. DiPerri, Jr. 
Anthony Fiore 



Uniform Patrol Officers 

Brian J. Gillis 
Francis D. Hancock 
Joseph F. Harris, Jr. 
Paul W. Jepson 
Paul A. Krzeminski 
Shawn W. Lee 
Louis Martignetti 
Stephen F. Mauriello 

Clerical Staff 
Patricia Gustafson and Julie Clark 



Thomas A. McConologue 
Eric T. Palmer/K-9 KIMO 
Michael Patterson 
Dennis P. Rooney 
Jon C. Shepard 
Matthew D. Stavro 
Brian Thornton 
Michael W. Wandell 



-40- 



The following are some statistical data that reflect calls for service over the past year. 



Wilmington Police Department Statistics, Year 2008 



ARRESTS: 




SEX CRIMES: 




Arson 





Rape 


1 


Assault & Battery 


42 


Indecent Exposure 





Breaking & Entering 


12 


Indecent A&B 


5 


Counterfeiting/Forgery 





Other 


1 


Disorderly 


12 


TOTAL SEX CRIMES: 


7 


Larceny 


22 






Larceny Motor Vehicle 


4 


MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS: 




Liquor Laws 


16 


Seat Belt 


338 


Malicious Damage 


6 


Using Without Authority 


4 


Murder 


1 


License Violations 


258 


Narcotics 


23 


Endangering 


15 


OUT, Drunk Driving 


64 


Leaving Scene Property Damage 


22 


Rape 





Operating Under Influence 


71 


Receiving Stolen Property 


18 


Unre gistere d/Uninsure d 


194 


Robbery 


2 


Speed 


2,510 


Sex Offenses, not Rape 


1 


Other 


1,677 


Other 


164 


TOTAL VIOLATIONS: 


5,089 


TOTAL: 


387 


CITATIONS ISSUED: 




PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 




Warnings 


2,764 


Ages: 




Complaints 


177 


11/12 





Non- Criminal 


978 


13/14 





Arrests 


123 


15 


2 


TOTAL CITATIONS: 


4,042 


16 


4 






17 


_8 






TOTAL UNDER 18: 


14 


CRIMES REPORTED: 
Threats 


26 


18 


15 


Assault & Battery: 




19 


3 


Knife 


9 


20 


7 


Other Weapon 


16 


21 


8 


Aggravated-Hand/Foot 


38 


22 


5 


Simple Assault 


58 


23 


4 


TOTAL ASSAULTS: 


147 


24 


5 






25/34 


19 


BREAKING & ENTERING: 




35/54 


38 


Residential 


78 


55 & Over 


2 


Non Residential 


60 


TOTAL OVER 18: 


106 


Attempted 

TOTAL BREAKING & ENTERING: 


7 

145 


TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 


120 







-41- 







ROBBERY: 




Purse Snatching 


1 


Firearm 





rick rocketing 


3 


Other Weapon 


1 


i^nophtting 


36 


Strong Arm 





rrom Motor Vehicle 


54 


TOTAL ROBBERIES: 


1 


MA/ Parts & Accessories 


1 






Dikes 


o 

o 






From Buildings 


DO 


IJNLIDEJN lb KErOKl ED: 




From Coin Machines 


U 


Homicide 


1 


utner 




Disturbances 


485 


1 U 1 AL LiAKL hiNillib: 


356 


Domestic Problems 


109 






Assist Other Agencies 


761 


Frauds 


56 


Fires Responded to 


80 






Juvenile Complaints 


32 






Suspicious Activity, Persons, Vehicles 


1,540 


Autos 


12 


Malicious Damage Complaints 


255 


Trucks & Buses 


2 


Prowlers Reported 


4 


Other Vehicles 


1 


Other Calls/Complaints 


16,179 


TOTAL MA^ THEFT: 


15 


MA/" Accidents 


810 






Alarms 


1,263 






Suicides & Attempts 


9 






TOTAL: 


21,528 


RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES: 








otolen Wilmington and 








Recovered Wilmington 


/ 


UlrlbK DbJrAKlMhjJN 1 l^UNCllONb: 




OLUlcIl VV lllLllllgLUri d.nQ 




Restraining Orders Served 


115 




5 


Parking 1 ickets Issued 


245 


Stolen Out of Town and. 




Firearms I.D. Issued 


27 


£ir»/T\70i*ori \a/ 1 1 m i n or+r^'r* 
iVt-L^U V trl CLI VV lllUlIlg tun 


4 


License To Carry Issued 


157 


TOTAL RECOVERED: 


16 


Dealer Permits Issued 


1 






Reports to Insurance 








Companies and Attorneys 


543 






Animal Complaints 


781 






Child Safety Seats 


457 






TOTAL: 


2,326 



Dogs Licensed 

Complaints 

Trips 

Trip Hours 

Animals Picked Up 

Animals Returned to Owners 

Animals Adopted 

Animals Picked Up Deceased 

Animals Quarantined 

Animals Euthanized 

Total Days for Pets in Kennel 

Pets Vaccinated at Rabies Clinic 

Citation Fees Issued 

Total Working Hours 



1,936 
908 
910 
874 
21 
18 
3 
44 
8 
1 
60 
219 

$100 

1,907.5 




Kimo rides shotgun. 



-42- 



FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE 



The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town and school 
buildings. We are responsible to ensure that facilities are properly cleaned and maintained for town 
employees, school children and personnel and the general public. We also repair town-owned traffic 
signals and assist the Water Department in maintaining their buildings. 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 2008: 

Routine maintenance was performed in all school and municipal buildings. 

Voting areas were set up for elections. 

Set up for Fourth of July Festivities. 

Chairs and choral risers were moved 
from school to school for musical 
concerts and plays. 

Food and suppUes deUvered for each 
school. 

Chairs, staging and sound system 
were set up for the Annual Town 
Meeting. 

All schools were cleaned over the 
summer and ready for a clean, fresh 
start to the school year. 

All town buildings' boilers and 
exhaust systems were cleaned and 
serviced over the summer. 




Public Buildings carpenter, Barry Ferrara, makes 
adjustments to a work station at Town Hall. 



New 4,100 square foot area of roof was replaced at the Department of Public Works Garage. 

Installed a new acoustical ceiling system and upgraded the hghting to a new energy efficient 
parabolic system in the first floor of the Memorial Library. 

Renovated the Circulation, Computer and Children's areas of the Memorial Library. 
New floor tiles were installed at the high school in Room 218. 

A fresh coat of paint was applied to the exterior of the Carriage House at the Tavern. 

A fresh coat of paint was applied to the exterior of the Library and the Book Store Next Door. 




-43- 



All town-owned traffic signals were maintained and repaired as needed. 

Maintained and repaired lighting for the Town Park, Town Common and the exterior of all town- 
owned buildings. 

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town departments, 
school administration and especially all the employees of the Public Buildings Department for their 
continued help, support and cooperation making 2008 a productive year. 



The year 2008 was a quiet year for the Permanent Building Committee. All projects are now 
complete. We hope that in the future, the construction of a new fire sub-station in North Wilmington 
will be funded. 

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, town 
departments, school administration and especially the people of Wilmington in their support and 
cooperation for future projects. 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I, Donald N. Onusseit, hereby respectfully 
submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington Department of PubUc Works for the year 



The Department of PubUc Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, Cemetery, Parks and 
Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. 

Major PubUc Works Projects : 

Woburn Street Reconstruction Project - Construction on the section of sidewalk on Woburn Street from 
LoweU Street to the Woburn city line continued in 2008. This project involves drainage improvements, 
a continuous sidewalk from LoweU Street to the Woburn city line and roadway reconstruction. Due to 
the water main and subsequent sanitary sewer construction in this section of Woburn Street, the 
majority of this project wiU not be accompUshed untU 2009, with final roadway paving scheduled for the 
spring of 2010. 

Library Parking Lot Improvement Project - The Department of PubUc Works completed the Library 
Parking Lot Improvement Project in 2008. The project included drainage upgrading, granite curbing, 
new walkways, new pavement and other landscaping improvements for the existing parking area. The 
project also included a new parking area adjacent to the existing parking lot with a connection between 
the existing upper, lower and new parking areas. 

Highwav Division (658-4481) 

AU regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as sweeping streets, 
instaUing street and warning signs, patching streets, cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the 
roadsides, picking up trash along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 

Curbing : Approximately 700 Unear feet of damaged bituminous concrete curbing was replaced at 
various locations. 

Intersection Islands : Due to constant maintenance problems, the two raised traf&c islands at the 
intersection of High Street and Middlesex Avenue were replaced with new flush grade textured concrete 
islands. 



Permanent 




Department of Public Works 



2008. 



-44- 



Drainage : Approximately 55 linear feet of partially collapsed culverts (two 48 inch CMP) on Shawsheen 
Avenue at Lubbers Brook were replaced with two 42 inch PVC ctdverts by the Department of PubUc 
Works in-house forces. 

The drainage system on Boutwell Street in the vicinity of Aldrich Road was extended by the 
Department of Pubhc Works with the installation of approximately 350 hnear feet of 12 inch PVC 
drainage pipe, one manhole and two catch basins. 

Roadway Projects : 

The following roadway projects were undertaken by the Department of Pubhc Works in 2008: 

Bituminous Concrete Resurfacing with Pavement Cold Planning : Chapter 90 funds from the 
Massachusetts Highway Department were used for a total of 5,209 linear feet (0.99 miles) of work on 
the following roadway projects: 

High Street (Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street) - 3,552 linear feet 
Middlesex Avenue (Route 62 to Salem Street) - 1,657 linear feet 

Microsurfacing : Chapter 90 funds were used for a total of 8,845 hnear feet (1.68 mUes) of 
microsurfacing (with crackseahng) on the following roadways: 

Woburn Street (Park Street to Route 62) - 3,865 hnear feet 
Hathaway Road (Woburn Street to Evans Drive) - 3,420 linear feet 
Draper Drive (Evans Drive to Gunderson Road) - 1,560 hnear feet 

Snow & Ice Removal : The Highway 
Division recorded 74 inches of snow for 
the winter of 2007-2008. The average 
annual snowfall for Wilmington is 
approximately 56 inches. 

Tree Division (658-2809) 

The Tree Division carried out aU regular 
maintenance work such as trimming, 
cutting, spraying, tree removal and tree 
planting. We removed roadside trees 
that were dead or interfered with pubhc 
safety at numerous locations. 

The Town Common was illuminated 
again this year with Christmas hghts 
installed by the Tree Division. This year 
the town used approximately 1,700 LED 
hghts for the first time. LED hghts use 
significantly less energy than conventional hghts. 

Dutch Elm Disease : The Tree Division removed 35 diseased Dutch Elm trees. 

Mosquito Control : The town contracts its mosquito control out to the Central Massachusetts Mosquito 
Control Project (CMMCP). The CMMCP practices Integrated Mosquito Management (IMM), blending 
state-of-the-art methods and techniques with expertise, experience and scientific research to provide 
member communities with modern, environmentally sound, cost effective mosquito control. As part of 
the effort to reduce the need for pesticides, they continue to expand their water management program. 
By cleaning clogged and overgrown waterways, mosquito breeding can be reduced, wetlands are 
restored and water quahty is improved. 




-45- 



BTl mosquito lanicide is used to treat areas where mosquito larvae are found. They routinely check 
known breeding sites, but also encourage the public to notif>' them of any areas they suspect could breed 
mosqvutws. Field crows will investigate all such sites and treat if needed. 

The goal is to handle all mosquito problems with water management or larviciding but it is recognized 
that there are times when adult mosquito spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases residential 
and recreational areas are treated with either hand-held or pick-up mounted sprayers. 

Cemetery- Division (658-3901) 

All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as mowing grass, weeding, 
trimming, resetting grave markers, pouring foundations for monuments, etc. 



Burials 

Died in WUmington 36 

Died Elsewhere 94 

Non-Residents 14 

Moved New Lot/Disinterment 1 

TOTAL: 145 



Receipts 



Interments 

Foundations 

Deeds 

TOTAL: 



$ 78,602.00 
$ 3,879.34 
$ 116.00 
$ 82,597.34 



(Cremations - 26; Infants — 1) 
Reserve 



Trust Fund 



Sale of Lots 
Refund Reserve 
TOTAL: 



$ 21,697.00 

I 

$ 21,697.00 



Perpetual Care 
Refund Trust 

TOTAL: 



$ 21,875.00 

I 

$ 21,875.00 



GRAND TOTAL: 



$ 126,169.34 



Cemetery Expansion : The Department of PubHc Works completed the roadway, filling, grading and 
seeding work of the Wildwood Cemetery Phase 2 expansion adjacent to the Veterans' Section. In 2009, 
the Department of PubHc Works will install the footings and boundary markers to make this new 
section available for use. This section will contain approximately 170 new lots (4 grave, 2 grave and 
single grave) with 450 graves. 




Parks & Grounds Division (658-4481) 

All regular maintenance was carried out throughout the year such as cutting grass, trimming shrubs, 
aerating playing fields and marking ball fields for baseball, softbaU, football, field hockey and soccer. AH 
fields and parks were fertilized and brush was cleared from the air vents at aU the town's schools. 



-46- 



Athletic Field Projects : All fields were aerated and fertilized during the year. Alumni Field at the high 
school was top dressed and reseeded in preparation for the start of the fall season. This year the Little 
League Association raised the funds for the reconstruction of the Glen Road Field No. 4. This work 
included grading and reconstructing the entire infield. 



Engdneering Division (658-4499) 



The Engineering Division assisted town departments, hoards and commissions with engineering related 
projects. This included the review of subdivision plans, site plans and special permits for the Planning 
Board, Notice of Intent plan fihngs for the Conservation Commission and various Board of Appeals 
cases. The Division also estabhshed surety estimates for subdivision projects and performed 
construction inspections of subdivision roadways. In addition, survejdng services and construction 
inspections were provided for various projects of the Department of Pubhc Works. 



Household Rubbish Collection. Disposal and Recycling (658-4481) 



The Department of Pubhc Works is responsible for the town's various refuse disposal and recycling 
programs. These programs include household rubbish and recycling; apphance, television and computer 
monitor recycling; yardwaste recycling; waste oil collection and household hazardous waste collection. If 
homeowners have any questions or complaints, please caU the above number. 



The yardwaste recychng program continued with the recycling of leaves, grass chppings, brush and 
Christmas trees. In January, 2,188 Christmas trees (approximately 22 tons) were collected at curbside 
by the Department of Pubhc Works. 

In 2008 the town collected the following amounts of trash and recyclable material: 



Trash CoUected at Curbside 10,054 Tons 

Recyclables Collected at Curbside 1,283 Tons (Recycled) 

White Goods CoUected at Curbside 63 Tons (Recycled) 

Yardwaste CoUected at Curbside 774 Tons (Recycled) 

Yardwaste Dehvered to Recycling Center 244 Tons (Recycled) 

Cathode Ray Tubes (TVs, Monitors) CoUected 31 Tons (Recycled) 



Working under a Beneficial Use Determination (BUD) issued by the Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP), the Department of Pubhc Works removed the foUowing waste 
material from our Yardwaste Center in 2008: 



Water Treatment Plant Residuals - 888 Cubic Yards 

Street Sweepings/Catch Basin Cleanings - 2,664 Cubic Yards 

Yardwaste (contaminated) - 3,552 Cubic Yards 



This material had been previously identified as requiring disposal at a total estimated cost to the town 
of over $200,000. The mixed material was approved by DEP for cover material at the Town of Danvers 
LandfiU and was transported to Danvers at no cost to the Town of WUmington. 




-47- 



Water & Sewer Deuartment (978-658-471 1) 



Water : 



The W'ater Department has focused this past year on bringing all the efforts from the last seven 
years together, to recapture our lost water supply. This will enable the Town's water system to 
operate appropriately and not under the Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) water 
emergency declaration. 

Two of the Salem Street Wells and the Shawsheen Avenue Well were cleaned and routine 
maintenance performed on the pumps. These wells are now in peak operating condition. 

The 11 master meters were inspected and calibrated. All were found to be in good condition and are 
reading accurately. These meters quantify the amount of water pumped from these locations; the 
aquifer at the pump stations, water into the water treatment plants (WTP), water leaving the WTP 
and water withdrawals at the interconnections with Woburn, Burlington and the MWRA. 

The MWRA pipeline project is complete. The project consists of 12,250 feet of 20-inch and 3,100 feet 
of 16-inch water main. The pipe allows the town to import water from the MWRA if a water 
shortage were to occur, as in the past six summers. The Town obtained all of its emergency water 
this year from this connection. If the Town decides to join the MWRA water system, this pipe would 
be used exclusively to supplement our existing water supply. 

Further work has been conducted at the Brown's Crossing Wellfield to obtain regulatory approval to 
replace the existing tubular wellfield with up to four 12-inch gravel-packed wells. The new wells 
would be installed above the flood plain, out of the wetlands and allow maintenance to more easily be 
performed. The new wells will be more efficient and should recover the lost capacity of the 1929 
Wellfield. Construction for the new wells and pump house will commence if funding is approved at 
the 2009 Annual Town Meeting. 

During the months of May and June, the water main flushing and valve-exercising program was 
performed. The department performs the flushing of mains to remove sediments and tuberculation 
that have accumulated in the water pipes. About 6.2 million gallons of water were used to 
accomplish this task. This is a necessary procedure to produce the delivery of high-quality water to 
your home or business. At this time, all fire hydrants are inspected and repairs are made to any that 
are not in proper working condition. 

We also asked all the owners of the 218 private yard hydrants if they would like us to check their 
hydrants for proper working condition. The majority of owners agreed to this free service and 178 
inspections were performed. Owners were notified in writing of any repairs that were needed and 
we lubricated any caps that were not easily removed. A detailed analysis of those who did not 
participate, or hydrants in need of repair, was sent to the Fire Department for their awareness. 

The department maintains and repairs as needed; 126 miles of water mains, 7,382 services, 1,174 
fire hydrants, 754 main valves, 3 storage tanks, 9 pumping stations and 2 water treatment facilities 
in the town. In addition, the department removes snow and ice adjacent to the fire hydrants and 
assists the Highway Division with roadway snow and ice removal. 



Pumping Statistics : 



GALLONS 



CUBIC FEET 



Wilmington Treated : 



Maximum per Day 
Maximum per Week 
Maximum per Month 



2,250,200 
15,024,696 
57,903,450 



300,829 
2,008,649 
7,741,103 



-48- 



MWRA Purchased: 


GALLONS 


CUBIC FEET 




Maximum per Day 


1,753,557 


234,433 




Maximum per Week 


8,529,868 


1,140,357 




Maximum per Month 


28,165,450 


3,765,434 




Combined: 








Maximum per Day 


3,101,178 


414,596 




Maximum per Week 


19,313,972 


2,582,082 




Maximum per Month 


72,724,630 


9,722,544 




Average per Day 


2,005,753 


268,149 




Average per Month 


61,161,362 


8,176,653 




Total Purchased (MWRA) 


135,979,561 


18,179,086 




Total Treated (Wilmington) 


597,956,784 


79,940,747 




Total Provided for Distribution 


733,936,345 


98,119,832 




Total Pumped from Aquifer (Raw) 


639,718,710 


178,060,579 




Precipitation Statistics: 








Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 


64.98" 






Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 


74.00" 












PERCENTAGE OF 


Consumption Statistics: 


GALLONS 


CUBIC FEET 


TOTAL PUMPED 


Municipal Use 


9,495,651 


1,269,472 


1.3 


Residential Use 


420,148,892 


56,169,638 


57.2 


Commercial Use 


36,580,401 


4,890,428 


5.0 


Industrial Use 


204,899,857 


27,393,029 


27.9 


Annual Water Main Flushing 


6,174,935 


825,526 


0.8 


Miscellaneous Hydrant Use 


565,845 


75,648 


0.1 


Total Accounted For Pumped 


677,865,581 


90,623,741 


92.4 


Unaccounted for Use 


56,070,764 


7,496,091 


7.6 


*The difference between accounted for and unaccounted for water consists of water lost to main and 


service breaks, fighting fires, street sweeping and theft. 






Water Distribution: 








The following new water mains were constructed in 2008: 






In-House Water Main Improvements: 


Length 


Size 


Hvdrants 


Hanover Street 


330' 


6" 


2 


Laurel Avenue 


500' 


6" 


1 


Mackey Road 


330' 


8" 


1 


Mackey Road 


20' 


6" 




Olive Street 


150' 


6" 


1 


Verdun Road 


400' 


8" 


1 


Woodland Drive 


90' 


8" 





-49- 



Water Mains Installed by Private Contractors : 



Argonne Road 



300' 



2" to 8' 



1 



Total water mains installed in 2008 were 1.000 feet of 6-inch and 1,120 feet of 8-inch. There were 7 
fire hydrants and 35 services installed in the system. 

Sewer Collection System: 



In 2008. the department continued to maintain and clean sewer lines as needed and or necessary due 
to known trouble areas. Leaks, blockages and structural deficiencies are corrected as soon as 
possible when a problem is discovered. 

The department, in conjunction with the DPW, purchased a Vactor Truck that will enable both 
wastewater and stormwater systems to be more efficiently and cost effectively maintained. 

The portion of the 36-inch interceptor is the last remaining piece of the waste water system that 
needs to be rehabilitated. The department is moving forward to correct this section of the Town's 
sewer system if funds are approved at the May 2009 Town Meeting. The engineering and design has 
been completed and a contractor has been selected through the Massachusetts bidding process. 

The Industrial Way Pump Station's electrical system was rehabilitated this year. A new panel 
which includes back-up power provisions and alarms to notify the appropriate personnel if a problem 
occurs at the station were installed. A portable generator was purchased to provide the back-up 
power if a prolonged power outage was to take place. 

There were 14 service connections made to the sewer system. 



HUMAN SERVICES & CONSUMER AFFAIRS 



2008 was one the busiest years on record for Wilmington Memorial Library. Circulation increased 
by 15% over last year. Computer workstations and study tables were often full in mid afternoon, 
especially with students and job hunters. The increase in library use during these tough times has 
confirmed the historic trend that more people use the resources of a public library in a down 
economy. The increased usage at the Wilmington Memorial Library may also be attributable to the 
ambitious library makeover that has been underway for the past two years. Although most libraries 
in the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium saw an increase in their circulation, Wilmington was 
among the top five libraries with the largest increase in circulation from July to November. 

Many visitors continue to comment on the library's new look with features that make it more 
comfortable and inviting. Visible library improvements made in 2008 include a new parking lot, 
lighting and ceiling on the first floor. Thanks to the Department of Public Works for getting the 
parking lot looking spiffy and to the Public Buildings Department for the new ceiling and lighting. 
The Friends of the Library purchased a handsome new sign for the front of the library that proudly 
announces to all passers-by that this building is Wilmington's public library. The new sign for the 
Book Store Next Door coordinates nicely with the library sign and is bringing in new customers. 

This past year library staff did the planning for the final phase of the interior makeover, including 
the design of a new circulation desk in the children's room, funded by the Friends of the Library 
2007 annual appeal. Installation of the new desk plus some new shelving and furniture is scheduled 
to be completed by spring 2009. The changes on the first floor of the library involved relocating staff 
offices for better efficiency and public service. The addition of a new display unit allowed for more 



Sewer: 




-50- 




Jolly Rogues present colonial music and song. 



face-out shelving of new books for a better browsing experience. With the support from the Friends 
of the Library 2008 annual appeal, we hope to complete the library makeover with custom signage to 
help users navigate independently throughout the hbrary and new end panels to provide more face- 
out display shelving. 

The library's program offerings in 2008 showed a 
23% increase in attendance. The addition of the new 
online program registration software and marketing 
techniques to promote hbrary programs proved to be 
effective. Well received programs for the adult 
audience during the winter included a program on 
identity theft and a workshop on nested doll 
painting. Tim Riley, author of "Tell Me Why: A 
Beatles Commentary," presented a program about 
the Beatles in February, and Ty Burr, the Boston 
Globe film critic, came to the library in March. The 
Jolly Rogues presented a lively program of colonial 
music in April. Dorthea Benton Frank, New York 
Times bestselling author of books set in South 
Carolina's Low Country, was the guest speaker at 
the Wilmington Middle School on Tuesday, May 6^^. 
This event was sponsored jointly by the Friends of the Wilmington Memorial Library and the 
Wilmington Education Foundation. A program about using eBay filled the library's meeting room to 
capacity in May. Mel Simons returned to Wilmington to present his program on Jack Benny to his 
many Wilmington fans. Fall programming kicked off with the "Desperate Household" series followed 
by two popular digital camera programs and a series on financial planning. On Saturday, October 
25*^, the Friends of the Library hosted the 
Apple Festival featuring a fun filled day of 
activities to commemorate the historic 
Baldwin Apple. Activities included an "Apple 
Bake Off' contest, apple trivia, music, apple 
cider pressing, a puppet show featuring the 
story of the Baldwin Apple and an exhibit of 
the Butters Farm restoration project. 

The annual summer reading program proved 
to be a big draw for all ages. Over 680 
children signed up for Play It and over 140 
teens have signed up for Create It Yourself. 
Thanks to a donation of $4,000 from the 
Friends of the Library for the 2008 summer 
reading program, the library was able to offer 
a variety of special programs including live 
theater, such as Beauty and the Beast, music 
events with performers like the popular 
Bernadette Baird and educational and fun 

events, such as Mike the Boston Bubble Guy. Over 100 readers participated in the Adult Summer 
Reading Program reading 641 books. Weekly winners received a Friends of the Library tote bag and 
a "Buy One, Get One Free" coupon to the Friends' Book Store Next Door. At the end of the summer, 
the grand prize winner received an MPS player purchased by the Friends of the Library. 




Apple Dessert Bake-Off Judges Terri Marciello, 
Lou Cimaglia and Mike Newhouse with winners 
Rosie Wallent and Nancy Hurley. 



In light of the special visit of the Vietnam Moving Wall to Wilmington in September, the Wilmington 
Reads committee selected The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien as its choice for 2009. 
Wilmington Reads is a community wide reading program where residents are invited to read the 
same book and attend a program or discussion event about the book. Participants will begin reading 
the book in January 2009 with programs following in March. 



-51- 



We continue to receive many nice comments 
from library users on the high level of 
customer service provided by the library 
staff. A "Parent Survey on Library Services 
for Children" conducted in October and a 
"Teen Services Survey" conducted in 
November, also included many favorable 
comments about our library staff. Library 
Director Christina Stewart received the 
"Unsung Heroine Award" from the 
Massachusetts Commission on the Status of 
Women. She was nominated for this award 
by Joanne Benton, Superintendent of 
Wilmington Public Schools, for her 
School Superintendent Joanne Benton (L) and School leadership and tenacity in transforming a 
Committee Chairman Margaret Kane (R) at State House worn and dated facility into a welcoming 
ceremonies honoring Library Director Christina Stewart. user-friendly place after the defeat of the 

proposal of a new library in 2005. We 
welcomed two new librarians to the library staff. Katie Huffman assumed the position of Reference 
and Adult Services Librarian in February, and Alicia Kendall assumed the position of Head of 
Technical Services in July. The entire library staff is acknowledged for working to make Wilmington 
Memorial Library one of the best in the state. 

We said good-bye to Barbara Hooper, a charter member of the Friends of the Library and a member 
of the Board of Library Trustees. Barbara Hooper was one of the volunteers who helped launch the 
Friends of the Library in 1997, serving as its first Membership Chairman. She also served as 
Treasurer and Program Chairman. Barbara was appointed to the Board of Library Trustees in 2004. 
Barbara was a volunteer extraordinaire who gave many hours on a variety of projects that 
contributed to making the library better for the community. Her thoughtful perspective and 
dedication to good library service will be missed. Michael Caira, Town Manager, appointed Susanne 
Clarkin to the Board of Library Trustees to fill the vacancy left by Barbara Hooper. The Board of 
Library' Trustees is acknowledged for its volunteer time and commitment to quahty library service. 

The Friends of the Library is once again acknowledged for its continued support, especially for the 
library makeover. The Friends gave a total of $26,500 to the library in 2008. In addition to funding 
60 programs, the Friends also purchased the outside library sign, computer workstations in the Teen 
Zone, the Hot Title display unit and museum passes to Zoo New England, the Peabody Essex 
Museum and the Massachusetts State Parks. The Friends of the Library Book Store Next Door 
celebrated its first anniversary in April. Book lovers from near and far enjoy visiting the only used 
book store in Wilmington. Wednesday evening hours during the summer and Sunday morning hours 
during the fall and winter were added this year allowing time for more shoppers to visit. The steady 
stream of revenue from this endeavor allows the Friends to respond to the library's requests for 
program funding and other library improvements. Thanks to all the volunteers who make possible 
this great community service. 

Monetary gifts to the library and memorial 
donations are gratefully acknowledged. The library 
purchased a new microfilm case with donations 
given in memory of George Boylen, a former library 
trustee. The library received a gift of $1,000 from 
the Moms Club of Wilmington used to purchase 
children's book and CD kits. Wilmington Memorial 
Library was selected as a recipient of the "Jeans 
Day" fundraiser sponsored by the Danvers Bank 
employees. This donation of $520 is earmarked for 

comfortable seating for the Children's Room. The Moms Club of Wilmington 

presents a donation to the library. 





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In closing on a tumultuous economic and political year, we are thankful for strong municipal support 
and for all who advocate on behalf of public libraries. With an economy predicted to adversely 
impact many in 2009, the Wilmington Memorial Library will be steadfast in its mission to enrich 
citizens with the information and inspiration it needs not only to survive, but to prosper in the New 
Year. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Administration: 

Christina A. Stewart, Library Director 
Charlotte Wood, Assistant Library Director 
Gloria Corcoran, Administrative Assistant 

Adult Services: 

Katie Huffman, Reference and Adult Service Librarian 
Linda Pavluk, Circulation Librarian 
Ruth Ellen Donnelly, Adult Circulation Assistant 
Laurie Lucey, Part-Time Reference Librarian 
Carol MacDougall, Desiree Maguire, Maureen Walsh 
Part-Time Library Assistants 

Part-Time Library Pages 
Nicholas Hayes, Amanda Morgan, 
Derek Stemmler, David To 

Children's Services: 

Susan MacDonald, Children's Librarian 
Barbara Michaud, Assistant Children's Librarian 
Karen Whitfield, Children's Circulation Assistant 

Brandy Danner, Teen Services Librarian 
Barbara Bresnahan, Part-Time Library Assistant 

Part-Time Library Pages 
Ruth Blaisdell, Jordan Higgs 
Nancy Hurley, Nicole losue, David Wang 

Technical Services: 



AHcia KendaU, Head of Technical Services 
Linda Harris, Assistant Technical Services Librarian 
Diane DeFrancesco, Technical Services Assistant 




Gingerbread House workshop for teens. The nested doll painting workshop at the library. 



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LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 2008 



Hours Open Weekly 
Winter 

Monday througjh Saturday 9-5 
Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 
Summer 

Monday through Friday 9-5 

Monday through Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 

Number New Patrons Registered 

Total Registered Borrowers 

Number of library visits 

Number of Items in Collection 
Items per capita 

Subscriptions 

Museum Passes 

Circulation 
Circulation per capita 

InterUbrary Loan 

To other libraries 
From other libraries 

Requests Placed 

Reference and Reader's Services 

Internet Use 

Conference Room 
Library 
Community 

Library Programs 

Children's Programs 
Teen Programs 
Adult Programs 

Total attendance at programs 
Children's Programs 
Teen Programs 
Adult Programs 



28,877 
24,931 



366 
421 

274 
71 
49 

7,938 
719 
1,254 




64 
56 

23,066 

977 

15,236 

139,732 

75,045 
3.25 

164 

11 

235,859 
10.23 

53,808 

36,147 
9,104 
16,254 
787 

394 



9,911 




I I lie Deaner presents Meals in Minutes. 



Paul Car|)eiitcr and Hank Stewart visit the 
World War II exhibit. 



-54- 



WilmieEtoe Arts Couiicil 



It seems impossible that another year has gone by and it's time to assess our work and progress at 
the Wilmington Arts Center. Along with our usual classes, concerts, art shows, rehearsals, recitals 
and workshops, our new and one of our favorite projects has been implemented in 2008. This is our 
Scholarship Program for Wilmington High School seniors going on to study music or art. In 2007, we 
awarded two scholarships. In 2008, the Council paid out $1,000 to Kristin Liberacki, studying 
Graphic Design and $1,000 to Angela Wang, studying Fine Arts. Upon completion of their first 
semester of school, a copy of their transcript was sent to the Arts Council and the money was then 
given out. In June of 2008, two more recipients were selected by the Scholarship Committee at the 
high school. Ashley Kealos, who is studying art and James Ham, who is studying music, are our two 
students who will shortly receive their help from the Arts Council. The Arts Council is thrilled that 
we can do this for young people starting their careers in the Arts. It is one of the most direct ways 
that the Council can promote the Arts! 

The Arts Council's main purpose is to run the grant program for the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council. Each year all Massachusetts towns are given a sum of money to grant to individuals and 
groups to support their artistic endeavors. In the fall of 2008, the Council went over all the requests 
for funds and have awarded the following grants: passes to the Museum of Fine Arts and the 
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, available at the library; a field trip to the Museum of Science for 
the Shawsheen VaUey Regional Vocational Technical High School; a workshop on pastel painting to 
be held at the library; two theater presentations about the Ufe and works of Ameha Earhart and 
Mark Twain; musical programs for the seniors living at the two Wilmington nursing homes and two 
concerts one by Contempaissance, a flute and guitar duo, and another by the New England Brass 
Quartet. 

Now for the main events of 2008! In April, the Arts Council sponsored the Celtic Band Annalivia, a 
local band featuring guitar, banjo, mandolin and fiddle. They entertained for two hours with a 
female vocaUst and instrumental music. The Saturday night crowd was very appreciative with the 
popular Irish music and folk songs. 

In June, the 28*'' Annual Art Show 
was held at the Arts Center. This 
is our most popular and well 
attended event of the year. The 
Friday night reception with music 
by our wonderful piano player, 
Bruce Margeson, entertained the 
artists, their friends and families. 
On Sunday, Contempaissance 
played classical music while the 
public viewed the paintings, 
photography and mixed media. 
This year, the Arts Council 
purchased two paintings. One is 
an oil painting of an old 
farmhouse by Ruth Mowder and 
the other a painting of a 
welcoming gate by Dorothy 
Carpenito. These were added to 
our permanent collection of art 
from local artists. Some of the 
collection is at the Ubrary right now 




Contempaissance — Flute and Guitar Holiday Concert. 



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In December, the Holiday Concert was the place to 
be! Again, wonderful live mu8ic with the added 
talents of twins Mary Ann and Debbie Steen 
singing beautifully! 

To help keep our building in good shape, a new air 
conditioner was donated by John Elia this summer. 
The town installed it and reconditioned the other 
two air conditioners. Also, donated this year was 
money for spackling and painting the main hall of 
the Arts Center. Hanne Castle, one of our students, 
donated $250 for paint and supplies. The Council 
has a list of volunteers, who will do the work! 



Vocalists Deborah and Mar>' Ann Steen. 



Sarah D. J. Carter Lectere Feed Coeieiittee 

Sarah Davis Jaquith was born in Wilmington in 1832 and was married to Cyrus Lewis Carter in 
1874. Before her death in 1907, she made a provision in her will stating, "I give and bequeath to the 
Town of Wilmington the sum of six thousand dollars in trust to invest the principle sum and to 
expend the income in maintaining courses of programs for the benefit of the people of Wilmington." 

The Sarah D. J. Carter Committee was formed in 1910. Since that time, the committee has 
continued to bring to the people of Wilmington interesting and entertaining programs. 

Our program for 2008 was the "Accordion Warrior", Gary Sredzienski. This program, presented in 
May at the Wilmington Middle School, was extremely enjoyable as well as informative. In addition 
to playing familiar songs on several different styles of accordion, he explained how an accordion 
makes its sounds as weU as the instrument's history. Mr. Sredzienski also told tales of artifacts he 
found while engaged in his daily swimming off the New England coast. 

The large group who attended this very enjoyable evening were appreciative to the Sarah Carter 
Committee for bringing this unique act to our Town. 

Our next program will be on the evening of May 21, 2009. The talented Richard Clark will be 
performing as "Mark Twain". As usual, this program will be presented free of charge at the 
Wilmington Middle School. 




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Historical Commission 



The Wilmington Historical Commission continues to strive to preserve and conserve Wilmington's 
historical buildings and sites and to educate our citizens of the town's rich history. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission's biggest challenge in recent years is the preservation of the 
Butters Farmhouse. This historic landmark built c. 1682 was acquired by the Town of Wilmington 
in October 2006. The Historical Commission was awarded a $200,000 appropriation from the State 
Legislature through the efforts of Representative James Miceli. Unfortunately, due to the economic 
crisis, this funding was rescinded. Currently, the Historical Commission is in the process of having 
architectural plans drawn to preserve the building; enabhng it to be a residence. It has always been 
the goal of the Historical Commission to see the building preserved and have a family live in this 
house as it has for over 300 years. The Historical Commission is seeking funding through State and 
Federal grants. It is hoped that we will be able to proceed with renovations during 2009. 

In March, the Wilmington Historical Commission along with the Friends of the Wilmington 
Memorial Library sponsored a program hosted by Gerry O'Reilly at the library called "Wilmington, 
Old Sports". At this program a sampling of Wilmington High School athletes from the 1930's to the 
1960's reminisced about their experiences while participating in school sports. The Commission 
later printed copies of Gerry O'Reilly's book "Wilmington, Old Sports". 

At the Wilmington Memorial Library "Apple Festival", the Historical Commission arranged an 
exhibit highlighting the Baldwin Apple and the site of its discovery; the Butters Farm. 

The Historical Commission continues to support our educational institutions by donating complete 
sets of books printed by the Commission to the Shawsheen Elementary School, Woburn Street 
Elementary School, West Intermediate School, North Intermediate School, Wilmington Middle 
School and High School as well as to the Wilmington Memorial Library. All books printed by the 
Historical Commission are available for purchase at 
the Harnden Tavern. 

On Veterans' Day, the Wilmington Historical 
Commission hosted a display of our military photos 
and artifacts in the Fourth of July building. This 
exhibit was very well attended. Those who viewed 
the exhibit expressed their sincere thanks to the 
Commission for having an opportunity to see these 
Historic Military Treasures. 

The Historical Commission continues to send 
informative "Welcome to Historical Wilmington" 
packets to new residents. 

Memberships in the National Trust Forum, Preservation Massachusetts, the American Association 
for State and Local History, the New England Museum Association, the American Museum 
Association and Historic New England were renewed. 

The Historical Commission continues to oversee the activities at the Wilmington Town Museum at 
the Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern. We work closely with, and support the efforts of. Museum Curator 
Terry McDermott. As attendance in activities continues to grow, the Commission wishes to thank 
the citizens of Wilmington for their interest in the programs presented. 

The Historical Commission thanks the Friends of the Harnden Tavern for their hard work and 
support. Although their Harvest Festival was canceled due to inclement weather, their Christmas 
Social was very well attended and thoroughly enjoyed by all. We also thank the Wilmington Garden 
Club for their help on the Tavern grounds; especially their maintenance of the herb garden. We 




-57- 



thank the Wilmington Mmutemen for their support in the activities held at the Harden Tavern. Our 
sincere thanks go to Nicholas Monteforte of Boy Scout Troop 56. As an Eagle Scout project he, along 
with his troop, constructed a stairway access to the upper level of the Harnden Tavern Carriage 
House. 

Thank you to the town administration for all their support in the Historical Commission's endeavors. 
Thanks also to the Public Buildings Department and Public Works Department for all their 
assistance. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission meets on the second Monday of the month. 

Col. Joshua Harnden Tavern and Wilmington Town Museum 

Wilmington's Town Museum is honored to have the support of the Town of Wilmington as we 
continue to "preserve and present our community's history". In the past year the Town Museum has 
brought to its citizens the following programs, exhibits and events: 

February - The Town Museum was pleased to participate in an exhibit of World War II 
memorabilia at the Wilmington Memorial Library which was organized by 
Wilmington Veterans' Agent Louis Cimaglia. John Webster, a Veterans' 
Agent in Maiden, was the primary exhibitor, but the Town Museum 
contributed items of local interest from the World War II era. 

April - Wildwood School Visits the Town Museum! 

In April, Wildwood School kindergarten students visited the Town Museum. 
Over a two day period, all the kindergarten students had a chance to tour the 
Museum where they learned about lifestyles of the past, played some old 
fashioned games and did crafts that included signing their own Declaration of 
Independence with a feather pen! 

May - Camp 40 Acres Day 

This was a repeat of a popular program from last year with Cathy Barry of 
Camp 40 Acres presenting information about this local day camp. Although 
the day was rainy and the camp representatives were not able to 
demonstrate outdoor activities, there were exhibits set up inside the Museum 
and visitors could see what type of activities are available to campers. 

Also in May, Eagle Scout Nicholas Monteforte and Boy Scout Troop 56 built a 
stairway leading to the upper entrance to the Carriage House, a stairway 
that made the Carriage House more easily accessible to the public. 

June - Flag Day Exhibit 

In conjunction with the Minutemen's Flag Retirement Ceremony on 
Saturday, June 14, the Town Museum was open for tours, featuring a new 
exhibit in the Carriage House of replica flags from the colonial era. The flags 
are on loan to the Museum from Steve Leet, a former Wilmington resident. 

July & Brown Bag Lunch and Games 

August - On Fridays throughout the summer, guests were invited to eat lunch on the 

lawn of the Tavern, overlooking the Wilmington Garden Club's herb garden, 
followed by simple games and crafts for children. Shuttlecock (or 
badminton), cup and ball and the game of graces were among the old 
fashioned activities available to visitors on these days. As an added 
attraction this year, visitors were able to visit the Carriage House where they 
could view our agricultural tool and colonial flag exhibits. 



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September - Harvest Festival with the Friends of Harnden Tavern 

The Friends' Harvest Festival is always greatly anticipated. Unfortunately, 
this year's event was cancelled due to torrential rainfall the weekend it was 
scheduled. It is hoped that the event will be back next year, better than ever! 

October - Eagle Scout Ribbon Cutting 

To celebrate the completion of the stairway to the Carriage House built by 
Eagle Scout Nicholas Monteforte and Boy Scout Troop 56, the Town Museum 
hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony and reception for Nick and his Troop. 

Minuteman Dinner 

The Museum hosted the Minutemen's colonial dinner, prepared by the 
Minutemen for the winner of their "Dinner with the Minutemen" contest. 
The food was deUcious and the guests enjoyed dining in the Tavern by 
candleUght. 

November- Veterans' Day Exhibit 

The Town Museum was dehghted to be able to exhibit our collection of 
veteran's memorabiha at the 4*'' of July Building on Veterans' Day in 
conjunction with the Veterans' Day Ceremony on the Town Common. A 
popular feature of the exhibit was the George Spanos panels, ten panels 
which display dozens of photographs of Wilmington's World War II soldiers 
as collected by the popular restaurant owner, George Spanos. 

December - Annual Holiday Social with the Friends of Harnden Tavern 

Bigger and better than ever, this year's Holiday Social was a special event 
featuring decorations from both the Friends of Harnden Tavern and the 
Wilmington Garden Club, always using fresh greens and other natural 
materials. Delicious refreshments were provided by the Friends, Cub Scout 
Pack 361 sang Christmas carols, Katelyn McFeeters entertained with her 
harp, and the children's craft room kept young visitors entertained. 

One of the most exciting occurrences at the 
Town Museum this year was the 
construction of the new staircase to the 
Carriage House by Eagle Scout Nicholas 
Monteforte and Wilmington Boy Scout 
Troop 56. From early meetings with Nick 
to develop plans for this project, through 
its completion in the spring and our ribbon 
cutting ceremony in the faU, it was a 
deUght to work with Nick and his troop. 
The bulk of the construction work was 
done over a weekend in May, and watching 
the Boy Scouts in action was truly 
amazing. Not only was the project 
completed on time and under budget, but 
Nick was able to make a cash donation to 
the Museum once the project was complete. 
Visitors to the Museum can now visit the 
Carriage House and its exhibits via an 
appropriately dignified and convenient 
entrance, for which we will always be 
grateful to Nick and the Boy Scouts. 




Nicholas Monteforte's Eagle Scout project was a new 
staircase to the Carriage House. With Nick is fellow 
Eagle Scout Matthew Marden. 



-59- 



Another notable occurrence at the Museum in 2008 was the receipt of a resource grant from the 
Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The grant, called "Connecting to Collections", is a 
collection of preservation books which provides information about museum and archive 
management. The grant is part of a nationwide initiative to raise public awareness and knowledge 
of preservation issues. The books are currently housed at the Town Museum and are available for 
members of the public to view. 

Current and former residents of Wilmington continue to add to the Museum's collection of town 
memorabilia. The Museum was honored with donations from or about the following families: 
Balser, Durkee, Bodnar, Berghaus, Porter, Nielson, Fielding, Linehan, MacDonald, Smith and 
Millward. The Wilmington Memorial Library also donated items which were deemed more 
appropriately held by the Museum, including a copy of a painting of Paul Revere, ten antique chairs 
from the library's Bicentennial Room and various books and recordings. The Museum is always 
happy to accept donations which enable us to better promote knowledge of Wilmington's history. 
The Museum is also happy to accept loans when they are deemed more appropriate than an outright 
donation; Steve Leet was generous in his loan of colonial era toys and flags which have been enjoyed 
by dozens of visitors to the Museum in the past year. 

Volunteers are an essential element of the Museum's success! Steve Berghaus and the entire 
Berghaus family continue to support the Museum in innumerable ways, including, but certainly not 
limited to, assistance with arranging exhibits. Steve also continues to collect information about the 
Carriage House and has created a binder of interesting facts about it which can be viewed by the 
public. Adele Passmore does a little bit of everything - she organizes, gardens, cleans and creates 
exhibits that tell the story of Wilmington as no one else can! When the Wildwood Kindergarten 
visited the Museum in April of 2008, it was Adele who assisted with tours. Bertha Deprez also 
seems to show up at the Museum whenever we need her! The stories of old time Wilmington Schools 
told by Kathleen Bell of the Wilmington Alumni Association and Paul Chalifour of the Wilmington 
Police Department were greatly enjoyed by Junior Girl Scout Troop #166 when the group visited 
another historic Wilmington building, the West Schoolhouse, in the spring of this year. 

Not only did the Wilmington Garden Club continue with its work in maintaining the Museum's herb 
garden and other garden spots around the yard of the Tavern, but they did a spectacular job 
assisting the Friends of Harnden Tavern with preparations for the Holiday Social in December. 
Their decoration in the front hall and parlor of the Tavern were a perfect compliment to the work 
done by the Friends throughout the rest of the building. 

The Wilmington Company of Minutemen is always interested in and supportive of the Museum and 
its events. Their flag retirement ceremony on the grounds of the Museum was a valuable lesson in 
patriotism. They lend color to Museum events and Open House days when they appear in uniform 
and illustrate lifestyles of long ago. When the Museum asks for assistance, someone from the 
Minutemen is always available to oblige. 

The Friends of Harnden Tavern continue to provide support and programs for the Museum, as well 
as an inventory of antique furniture that gives the Harnden Tavern its distinct character. This 
year's Holiday Social, presented by the Friends, was the best attended in recent memory. Although 
their popular Harvest Festival was cancelled due to inclement weather, we look forward to the 
event's return in the not too distant future! The Friends can always be counted on to provide the 
support that keeps the Museum a valued part of our community. 

The Town Museum remains grateful for the continuing support from Town departments that keep 
the Museum operational and open to the public. The DPW, the Public Buildings Department, and 
Wilmington's Senior Center, all provide services to the Museum at one time or another. The 
Museum is also privileged to be able to work with the Wilmington Memorial Library, the Wilmington 
Recreation Department and the Wilmington Public School system, as needed. This year the Museum 
was pleased to be able to work with Veterans' Agent Louis Cimaglia on traveling exhibits of interest 
to Wilmington's Veterans. The continuing support of the Town Manager's office is always greatly 
appreciated. 



-61- 



When naming those who support the Museum, the Wilmington Historical Commission should not go 
unnientionod. It was the work of the Wilmington Historical Commission to create the Town Museum 
ten years ago. and it is to the Commission's vision, and the vision of Commission Chair, Carolyn 
Harris, that the Museum owes its successful existence. 

The Wilmington Town Museum at the Harnden Tavern is always looking for new stories to tell, new 
items to exhibit. What do you know about Wilmington's past? Do you have an artifact you would 
like to share with the public? Call the Town Museum! It is there to serve you, the citizens of 
Wilmington. 

In 2008 more people than ever visited the Museum! Almost 800 guests, including seven Scout 
troops, visited the Museum throughout the year. 



Winter Houi's Tuesday & Thursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

First Sunday of month, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 
Fourth Wednesday of month, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. 

Community Use 

Historical Commission Monthly meetings, programs 

Friends of Harnden Tavern Monthly meetings, programs 

Garden Club Holiday Party in December 

Council of Minutemen Bi-Monthly Meetings 

Senior Center Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program 

Public Schools Kindergarten Tour, student research and enrichment 

Single Visit Various Scout Troops, Camp 40 Acres, Association of Personal 

Historians 



Travehng Exhibits Contributed to World War 11 Exhibit at Library presented by 

the office of Wilmington's Veterans' Agent. 

Contributed to Wilmington Memorial Library's Apple Festival 

Veterans' Day exhibit at 4'^ of July Building 




The Recreation Department's continuing goal is to offer high quality, relevant programs and services 
to the residents of Wilmington. The Recreation Department aims to provide solutions to new 
challenges faced by residents in evolving life situations. New residents can meet others, parents can 
find a wide variety of reasonably priced programs for their children to sample, "empty nesters" might 
take a class or enjoy theater or sporting event tickets and residents of all ages continue to reap the 
benefits of group travel and assorted fitness programs. The Recreation Department has been in full- 
time operation for 38 years. The department is located in Room 8 at the Town Hall. Office hours are 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 



The Recreation Commission, formed in 1953, acts in an advisory and policy making capacity. 
Volunteer members are: C. Michael Burns, Chairman; Sheila M. Burke, Vice-Chairman; Maribeth 
Crupi, Secretary; Charles Biondo and Mark Kennedy. Commissioners are active in various groups, 
committees and clubs throughout town. 

The Recreation Office staff remains small, with only two full-time employees (director and senior 
clerk) and one part-time office assistant. In addition, there are over 110 part-time and seasonal 
employees and over 250 volunteers who help to run the department's programs. The department 
offers, on a year-round basis, an ever-changing slate of activities for residents of all ages. While the 
office is open Monday through PViday, recreation programs are scheduled virtually every day of the 
week and into the evening hours. 



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A primary objective of the Recreation Department is to offer a wide variety of quality programs that 
are as affordable as possible. Registration fees remain low, especially in comparison to other towns 
or organizations. The department is funded by a variety of sources. The town appropriated budget 
provides for a full-time director and clerk as well as some limited supplies and staff training costs. 
Program fees fund the position of the office assistant. A combination of program fees and donations 
heavily supplement the town-funded budget. We strive to keep fees and costs low by utilizing cost- 
saving methods including the bid process, fund-raising and in-kind services. We continue to search 
for innovative ways to generate funds to offset costs for the recreation consumer. 



Volunteers are critical to the success of Recreation programs. Volunteers might find themselves 
spreading out candy for the Annual Easter Egg Hunt, coaching a T-Ball or Basketball team or 
serving Breakfast with Santa to resident children and their families. We greatly appreciate our 
residents who give so generously of their time and most report that they also gain on personal levels 
by volunteering. We receive generous donations from local businesses and organizations. Some of 
these valuable contributors include: Analog Devices, Anytime Fitness, Century 21 (Starwood), CVS, 

Danversbank, Dunkin' Donuts of 321 
Main St., Dunkin' Donuts of 195 Main St., 
Everett Lodge lOOF (Odd Fellows), HRH 
Insurance, Kiwanis, Knights of Columbus, 
Lowell Savings Bank, Massachusetts 
Fisheries and Wildlife, Ninety-Nine 
Restaurant & Pub, Realty Executives, 
Rotary Club of Wilmington, Shriners, 
Sons of Italy, TewksburyAVilmington 
Elks, Walgreens (Tewksbury), 
Wilmington Arts Council, Wilmington 
Fire Department, Wilmington 4*'' of July 
Committee, Wilmington PoHce 
Department and the Wonder Years 
Learning Center. 




The Recreation Department continues to increase and 
improve our program offerings to meet the ever- 
increasing demands for classes, activities, 
entertainment and travel experiences. We actively 
sohcit suggestions for future offerings and encourage 
our talented residents to consider teaching a class. 
The department strives to meet the increased demand 
for children's programs by expanding the scope and 
number of these programs. We offer a very 
successful, annual intergenerational program in 
conjunction with the Elderly Services Department. 
Our hohday and seasonal celebrations enhance the 
sense of community and identify Wilmington as a 
unique town. They include the Easter Egg Hunt, 
Fishing Derby, Concerts on the Common, Horribles 
Parade, Santa's Workshop and our own Breakfast 
with Santa. 




Volunteers help the Easter Bunny fill eggs 



A mainstay of the Recreation Department is our sports leagues and programs. We consistently 
register over one thousand children each year for Jr. and Recreation Basketball Leagues. Other 
recurring and tremendously popular programs include "The Rookies" T-Ball, Kinder Soccer, Aerobics 
and 35+ Basketball. Recognizing the benefits of physical activity, we have introduced new offerings 
this year that promote health and wellness including Kids in Motion, Girls Basketball Shooting 
Chnic, Learn to Skate - Hockey, and "The Movement in Me" for special needs children. 



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Summor is extremely busy for the department as we offer a multitude of programs for families and 
residents. The Playground and Tiny Tots programs offer summertime recreation and socialization 
for Wilmington children. Other offerings include an opportunity to try something there is no time for 
during the school year. Some examples from this past summer include two basketball leagues that 
play outdoors under the lights in the evening, summer theatre workshops, sailing and kayaking 
lessons on the Charles River in Boston, golf and tennis lessons and several sports clinics. We offered 
a variety of trips in the summer including a day trip to Boston to ride the Duck Boats and tour 
Fenway Park, a day trip to Block Island, a "Casino Escape" overnight trip to the Connecticut 
Casinos, a weekend trip to follow "our Red Sox" on the road to Toronto and a weeklong trip to tour 
Chicago and Mackinac Island. In addition, the Recreation Department is responsible for the 
oversight of the Silver Lake Beaches. The newly created Healthy Wilmington Coalition, as well as 
our support of the new Wilmington Walks program, will further expand possible outdoor recreational 
options for residents. 

We continue to offer movie and event tickets at reduced rates, and we are sometimes able to secure 
tickets to "difficult to come by" events such as the Red Sox, Lowell Spinners, Bruins, Celtics and 
Disney on Ice productions. We offer tickets to local theater productions for shows ranging from "42""^ 
Street" at the North Shore Music Theatre to "Legally Blonde" and "The Grinch Who Stole 
Christmas" at the Opera House in Boston. Many residents turn to our quarterly flyer when making 
decisions for their entertainment options. We offer great gift possibilities including discounted movie 
tickets and gift certificates that may be redeemed for any of our programs or trips. Increasing 
numbers of residents are choosing to give the gift of travel and recreation programs, which provide 
enhanced life experiences for their family and friends. 

Our trips continue to grow in popularity as residents enjoy round trip transportation to and from 
Wilmington, reasonable prices and the ease of having a pre-planned itinerary. Perennial favorite 
day trips include New York City in May and December, monthly trips to Foxwoods Casino and our 
annual visit to Yankee Candle and Bright Nights in the Springfield area during the holiday season. 
New trips that were thoroughly enjoyed included a gourmet luncheon at the Johnson and Wales Inn 
with a comedy show, the Springfield Tattoo to see the Royal Highland Regiment of Canada in action 
and a delicious, "chocolate-y" tour of Boston on the Old Towne Trolley. During the summer the 

children enrolled in the Playground 
and Tiny Tots programs could 
participate in many age appropriate 
field trip excursions. We offer 
frequent theatre trips so that 
residents can easily purchase tickets 
to current offerings in Boston that 
include bus transportation, thus 
avoiding both parking and traffic 
hassles. In 2008 our overnight trips 
included: an Eastern Caribbean 
Cruise, Sedona, Arizona, Red Sox 
Road Trips to Baltimore and 
Toronto, Casino Escape to the 
Connecticut Casinos, Chicago and 
Mackinac Island and Atlantic City. 

In an attempt to be as accommodating as possible, most Recreation programs can be registered for 
by mail or by drop-off in the Town Hall night slot. Our newsletter and many required registration 
forms are available online through the Town website, by accessing Human Services, Recreation, then 
Newsletter. The Recreation Department is joining the efforts of many other town departments in an 
effort to be "more green". We will no longer distribute printed copies of our quarterly flyer through 
the schools, but we will continue to provide flyers in Town Hall, Wilmington Memorial Library and 




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the Buzzell Senior Center. We hold special registrations outside of regular office hours for our most 
popular programs (Tiny Tots and Red Sox Ticket Sales). One of the most common requirements of 
the Recreation staff is to act as an information source. We answer a wide variety and large number 
of questions daily about local and regional services. 

Wilmington is a suburban community, considered a "well located town", with easy access to major 
roads, parks and beaches, sporting events, theatre, arts and museums. Today's recreation consumer 
is searching for opportunities to access all of these area attractions, as well as local activities. The 
Recreation Department allows people to choose a new sport or science club, learn a new skill, 
sociahze with fellow residents and enjoy recreation at a convenient location and at a reasonable 
price. These dynamics stress the importance of town support for the Recreation Department. The 
positive feedback and generous donations we receive are evidence of the appreciation of local 
residents and businesses for the Recreation Department. We are an ever-changing environment and 
a solution to the continual changing needs of our residents. The Recreation Department's abihty to 
adapt and our commitment to provide quahty service is a trademark that we stand by. 




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Elderly Services 

An overall increase of l. t"o in the general Massachusetts population occurred between 2000 and 
2006. The fastest growing age group was the 85 and over group, which increased in size by over 17% 
in Massachusetts and about 25"o in the United States as a whole in 2006. The older population for 
the Town of Wilmington has grown 12°o since 2006 and 27% since the 2000 federal census. Today 
there are 3,982 elderly residents ages 60 years and older, of these, there are 9 residents who are 100 
years and older. Four \Q0^^ birthdays were celebrated in 2008 at the Buzzell Senior Center. 

Wilmington Department of Elderly Services seeks to maintain the highest quality of services and 
programs for its elderly residents by providing: Information and Referral Services, Care Planning 
and Management Services, Health and Wellness Services, Transportation Services, Educational 
Programs, Counseling and Family Support Services, Financial and Health Insurance Counseling, 
Medical Advocacy, Volunteer Opportunities and SHINE (Serving Health Information Needs of 
Elders). 

The year 2008 was very good to the Wilmington Department of Elderly Services. Community 
organizations, Wilmington High School students and the Wilmington "CARES" program provided 
enormous volunteer support. Lahey Clinic Community Benefits Committee and Massachusetts 
Executive Office of Elder Affairs have been extremely supportive in their grant monies that have 
further enhanced and strengthened the wellness programs provided at the Buzzell Senior Center. 

In 2008, the Department was very fortunate to be the recipient of $15,000 from the Lahey Clinic 
Community Benefits Grant for a fourth year. We were able to provide: 

• T'ai Chi Classes - (2) 8-week sessions - Evening classes from March to June 

• Country Line-Dancing (4) 8-week classes 

• Low Impact Aerobics Class - 52 weeks taught by a Certified Aerobics Instructor 

• Yoga Classes - (3) 8-week sessions 

• Total Control: A Pelvic Wellness National Researched Program for Women in 
collaboration with YMCA (2) 7-week sessions - 2 times a week 

• "Chronic Disease Self-Management Program" (2) intense 6-week sessions - A Nationally 
Researched Program of self support for a better understanding of living with a chronic 
disease. 

• CATZ Adult Fitness: Where the Athlete's Train - (2) 16 sessions of training (8- weeks 2 
times a week) 

The response to all of the programs has 
been overwhelming and has proven to be a 
great endeavor for the Department. 

There were over 16,500 elderly visitors 
this year who participated at the Buzzell 
Senior Center in programs such as: 
socializing, exercise classes, dance classes, 
ceramic classes, nutrition classes, 
computer classes, arts & crafts, sing-a- 
long group, widow's friendship group, 
quilting group, T'ai Chi classes, walking 
group in collaboration with Harold Parker 
State Park and Candlepin bowling in 
North Reading. Over 90% of these classes 
are lead by volunteers; they are dedicated 
elders who graciously give their time and 
energy. 




Adult Fitness programs funded by Lahey Clinic. 



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The funds that the Department receives from the Executive Office of Elder Affairs supports a part- 
time (20 hours a week) Outreach Worker, part-time (10 hours a week) Clerk and a part-time (10 
hours a week) Program Coordinator. The monies also support the mailing and printing of our 
monthly newsletter, the "Buzzell Buzz". This comprehensive and entertaining newsletter is 
celebrating its 5^^ year and is written and edited by a wonderful group of volunteers. Without their 
time and dedication this newsletter would not be possible. The newsletter can be found at the 
Buzzell Senior Center, the Town Manager's Office and the Wilmington Memorial Library. The 
"Buzzell Buzz" not only provides information about activities and great photos of the Buzzell Senior 
Center but also assistance programs. Many include: prescription programs, Senior Tax Work-Off 
program. Fuel Assistance program, food stamps. Medicaid applications, RIDE applications and other 
types of services that are available to the elders in the community. 

The Town of Wilmington provides many daily services through the Department of Elderly Services. 
A free service that is rarely found in the surrounding Massachusetts area is transportation to all the 
Wilmington elderly residents 60 years and over. This transportation is provided within a 13-mile 
radius of Wilmington. We have a full-time van driver to meet these transportation needs. We are 
fortunate to have a van that is equipped to handle a wheelchair along with its passengers. 
Transportation of elders includes, but is not limited to, their medical appointments, shopping and to 
the Senior Center. The van continues to be a vital service to the elders of Wilmington. There were 
over 20,000 miles traveled to accommodate the elders this year. A full-time respite care worker 
further complements this service. She also provided necessary transportation to medical 
appointments. With individualized attention given to the elder for the doctor's appointment, making 
sure the elder remains safe and able to communicate with family regarding vital information. She 
traveled 11,258 miles for the year 2008 and made 299 home visits. This service is specifically for 
elders who are unable to be alone due to severe health conditions (cancer treatment, dialysis and 
dementia), hearing loss and/or overall weakness. There has been an increase in the amount of elders 
that need on-going transportation, due to critical health issues. The respite care worker also 
provides home visits to elders that are isolated and need regular "check-ins" to make sure they are 
stable. This position is a vital role for the community. 

The Department of Elderly Services continues to provide our home delivered meals program. This 
program provides the homebound elders of Wilmington with one hot meal five days a week, for the 
minimal cost of one dollar a meal. There are approximately 70-80 meals delivered daily, Monday 
through Friday, to the elders of Wilmington. Elders not only rely on these meals, but also the daily 
contact. The drivers are responsible to come to the Senior Center after their deliveries to give an 
update on the elders they visit. The elders and their families are assured that if there should be a 
problem during the time of the delivery, the elder will be assisted and the families will be notified. 
Overall, the home delivered meals program is a crucial part of the Department's services. A total of 
16,511 meals were served to the elders in our community. 

One of our continuing specialty programs is the "Medical Equipment Lending Program," another 
service that has increased in demand, where elders and their families can borrow equipment in order 
to stay at home safely and assist in curbing the cost of such equipment. We offer wheelchairs, 
walkers, canes, bath chairs, benches and commodes. During the year 2008 we continued to receive 
calls from elders, their family members and from the local Visiting Nurses' Association that visits 
Wilmington residents. This year we were fortunate to offer two electric wheelchairs, scooters and 
electric recliners as part of this lending program. 

For the year 2008, the need for social service was on the rise: fuel assistance, health insurance 
issues. Medicare Part D program, filing property tax abatements and deferrals, prescription costs 
(prescription advantage program), protective service issues and servicing the age bracket of 50-59 
that so often fall through the cracks with the government for any form of social service assistance. 
With this growing need, the Department continues to find themselves on the frontline of providing 
services and referrals. This, in turn, increased the amount of home visits by the Director, outreach 
worker and respite care worker in order to meet the needs of the most critical cases. Another way 



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the Department did further outreach was with our telephone reassurance program. With the 
assistance of our part-time outreach worker, she was able to make weekly calls (591 calls this year) 
to our most critical homebound elders and home visits when needed. This type of communication not 
only keeps the Department connected in cases of emergencies but develops a bond of trust between 
worker and elder. 



The Department collaborates closely with Town Nurse, Judy Baggs, who visits the Senior Center 
weekly to provide blood pressure clinics, diabetic screenings and monthly cholesterol screenings. 
Judy is able to make home visits to elders unable to make it to the Senior Center due to health 
ailments. There were over 375 flu shots given for 2008. In 2009, she will be hosting weekly health 
sessions to address elder's health concerns and medical needs. 



Other monthly services include Podiatrist, SHINE coordinator, Marilyn Penney and Charlotte 
Stewart. Shear Pleasure (hair stylists) and Attorney Nancy Hogan who offers free monthly 
consultations to seniors in need. Annually, volunteer accountants from VITA, beginning the first 
week of February through the first week of April, assist Wilmington elders with their taxes at the 
Wilmington Town Hall Auditorium. For 2008, there were 165 elders served through this program 
Several of them were able to receive additional monies due to the "Circuit Breaker" tax break. In 
fact, there were several elders that had been unaware of this tax break and were able to receive 
funds retroactively for the years they missed. 




Members of the Rotary Interact Club organized a yard cleaning project. 



We are happy to mention that 
the collaboration with the 
Wilmington Public Schools 
continues to thrive. One 
WUmington High School 
student organization that has 
participated at the center is 
the Rotary Interact Club 
students. Over 30 students 
from this organization assisted 
in making our "Valentines 
Day Celebration" an 
outstanding success. They 
served the elders a "Harrow's 
Pot Pie" lunch and fresh 
homemade desserts. In 
November, over 85 students 
from this group organized and 

raked the yards of 12 elderly residents. The elders were extremely appreciative for a much needed 
ser^-ice. Other Wilmington High School groups are the Medical Careers Club and Wilmington's 
Helping Services Club who continue to be involved at the Buzzell Senior Center. In May, we held 
our 2°"* annual "Spring Fling" dance with co-sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club. We served a 
delicious dinner, prom pictures and dancing. The evening was a true success. This year we were 
also surprised by several graduate students coming back to visit everyone. October was our 3'^<* 
annual Game Day, in which 35 students participated in board games, card games and country Line 
dancing. In November, the students were of great assistance in our annual Flu Shot program, 
servicing over 350 elders. Another wonderful intergenerational program took place when the 
Wilmington Recreation Department and the Department of Elderly Services teamed up for the 4'^ 
annual "Summer Magic" celebration of the young and old. In July, we visited the Super Scientific 
Circus at the North Shore Music Theater followed by an "all you can eat" lunch of pizza and soda at 
Prince Pizzeria in Saugus, MA. It was a great opportunity to show the children that the Buzzell 
Senior Center is a fun place to visit. It also gave the elders the opportunity to show their 
grandchildren where they like to meet their friends and have great activities. 



This summer we started a "Quilting Through the Years" class, through their imagination, the 
generations worked on making an intergenerational quilt by holding "hands." They took a copy of 
their hands and then decorated their hands joined together. This program was held at the North 



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Intermediate School, a 3- week one-hour session to work together with 10 students from the summer 
"CARES" program and 10 participants from the center. We thank Jane Hill for being an outstanding 
instructor and for making this program such a success. 

We were also very happy to announce that with the dedicated assistance of volunteer Pat Lyons, RN, 
BSN, CRN the Department of Elderly Services received an additional grant from Northwest 
Suburban Community Health Alhance for "Diabetes Management and More Part II." The goals are 
to have elders be able to self manage their diabetes through education, to improve self-monitoring 
skills, knowledge of self efficacy along with coping skills. A Certified Diabetes Educator and 
Nutritionist, Elvira Johnson, MS RD, CDE, and LDN Neighborhood Diabetes and Social Worker, Dr. 
Pat Kenney of Wilmington Family CounseUng, provide the education to achieve positive health- 
related outcomes through behavioral changes. We are also very fortunate to have Ann Fitzgerald as 
our consultant. This group of 25 participants met twice a month for 12-sessions which was 
completed in June 2008. 

The Department was very excited to announce a sequel program titled "Eat Better and Move More 
Part 11" which integrated nutritional education, physical activities and socialization. This nationally 
researched 12-session nutrition and fitness program was designed by the National Resource Center 
of Nutrition, to encourage older adults to make healthy choices as part of a daily routine. This free 
program was made possible by a generous donation through the Wilham Nee Memorial Fund. "Eat 
Better and Move More Part 11" was a weekly program that ran from April to June at the Buzzell 
Senior Center. This 12-week program allowed elders 60 years and older to participate in beginner 
level physical activity sessions. These sessions focused on strength, flexibility and balance and used 
weight and resistance bands with chair exercises. During the sessions there were nutrition mini- 
talks by a licensed nutritionist that ties in healthy eating habits and a fitness instructor for exercise. 
Every participant received a free meal at the center and a log-book to keep a nutrition and exercise 
journal. There were 36 participants and all felt it was a program that made a "great change" in their 
exercise and dietary habits. 

The year 2008 was a great year for strong volunteer leadership with the Elderly Commissioners: 
David Landers, Chairman; Gayle Regan, Vice Chairman; Albert Lavalle, Rosemary Cross, John 
King, Mary Smith and Carol Hulburt. This year they have continued to work very hard in 
accomplishing their mission. They worked closely with the Director and assisted in meeting the 
needs of the elders of Wilmington. 

The Department of Elderly Services was 
overwhelmed by the generosity for our 
lOtii annual hoUday "Giving Tree." This 
tree gave the community the opportunity 
to help elderly people in their town. The 
outpouring of generosity was amazing - 
the Methodist Church, Boy Scout Troop 56 
gave gift certificates to the local grocery 
store for the 8*^ consecutive year, 
Wilmington famihes and residents. There 
were over 350 elders that received a gift 
from this event. The Department received 
an overwhelming amount of thank you 
notes that continue to come in. None of 
this gratitude would happen if it was not 
for the outpouring of giving as we see in 
the Town of Wilmington. 




Enjoying the Elderly Service Department's Spring Fling. 



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The Abundant Life Church sponsored a Homebound Meal for 100 Wilmington elders in November. 
Over 15 church volunteers came to the senior center to pick up meals and personally deliver them to 
the elders. During their deliveries they watched for elders who did not have their house numbers 
posted on their homes or mailboxes for identification. The following weekend the volunteers went to 
the homes in need with the appropriate numbers. In July, (to kick off the 4"' of July celebrations) 
the Wilmington Police Union also did a special homebound meal. 

In May, the Buzzell Senior Center held a "Remember Our 
Veterans" luncheon. This was a great opportunity to get 
everyone together and share our appreciation to all 
American Veterans who served in making our country what 
it is today. Veterans' Agent, Louis Cimaglia, shared the 
speech he had given on Memorial Day at the Wildwood 
Cemetery. In November, Louis Cimaglia graciously 
supplied a complete Thanksgiving Turkey Dinner to many 
veteran elders. 

The Department tries to be able to give back to the 
community in some small fashion. One example is our 
support to the Wilmington High School Scholarship Fund. 
On June 1, 2008, the elders presented our 10''' annual 
scholarship to Thomas Barry. In preparation for 
graduation in 2009, we had two new fundraisers. In 
September we held our first successful "Senior Harvest 
Breakfast." We served 60 participants and with the success 
of this breakfast we hope to continue next year. In 
November we had our first "Wilmington Has Talent" show, 
Sharin Chakioan and Paul Godzyk at the Audrey Reed and David Landers produced a live variety 

Spring Fling. show at the Wilmington High School Barrows Auditorium. 

The performances were performed by Wilmington High 
School students and elders through the school support of Sue Rowe, High School Nurse and Jason 
Luciana, High School Music and Drama Teacher. Due to the strong volunteer support we were able 
to raise over $1,200 for our Wilmington High School Scholarship fund for 2009. Thanks to everyone 
involved in making it a spectacular event. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the following for their generous donations in 2008: 
Dunkin' Donuts on Middlesex Avenue, for their daily supply of donuts; TewksburyAVilmington Elks, 
for their Thanksgiving Dinner Dance that served 230 seniors this year; Rotary, for their monthly 
donations for financially strapped elders and the Rotary Interactive Group, for their Valentine's Day 
event for the elders at the Senior Center. The Kiwanis Club has taken a special interest in 
organizing some fun events with the Buzzell Senior Center; a lovely catered dinner in June for over 
100 elders at the Senior Center. A special thanks to all the clubs and businesses who donated 
generously for raffles and give-a-ways. We would also like to extend our thanks to our 135 dedicated 
volunteers who were "appreciated" at the annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon. 

Thanks to the Town Manager, Michael Caira, and all town department heads for their help and 
ongoing assistance. Thanks to the seniors who volunteered hundreds of hours visiting elders in their 
homes, hospitals and nursing homes; for the volunteers who delivered holiday catered meals (100 
meals in total) to the homebound; and to the instructors that volunteer faithfully every week to 
instruct classes and programs. Thanks to all who made it possible for our 10'^'' year of the "Giving 
Tree" to be a huge success. Lastly, thanks to all who gave their precious time and money in making 
the annual Senior Citizen Holiday Fair a success again in 2008. 




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Houl 



sm 



9 




Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the provisions of Chapter 
121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 24CFR (Code of Federal Regulations); Chapter 
SOB of the State Procurement Law and State and Federal Code of Ethics. A five-member Board of 
Commissioners, consisting of four elected and one state appointed member, oversees the Authority's 
policies and procedures. The Executive Director is charged with the administration of these 
procedures. 

The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing low-income housing for 
68 seniors/disabled, and a congregate unit in conjunction with CMARC of Woburn, MA, along with 
13 (705) families of conventional three-bedroom housing owned by the Authority. However, more 
senior/disabled housing is needed. As always, the Authority gives first preference for housing to 
Wilmington resident veterans and Wilmington residents. The Authority also services the Federal 
Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive 
home care and other social services in an effort to assist seniors to live independently. However, 
more is needed. The recent budgetary cuts to vital service positions in the home care field have a 
dire impact on the type and amount of services agencies such as Minuteman can provide. Adequate 
funding is needed, so as to maintain the quality of life in our aging state developments. 

Due to the cuts in the state budget for Local Housing Authorities for the last several years, the cuts 
have directly impacted the Housing Authority's budget and the ability to continue to make quality 
improvements. Zero cap bottom hne budgeting only allows agencies to make necessary 
improvements or emergency repairs. 

The Authority this year was very fortunate to receive technical assistance and emergency capital 
improvement bond funding from DHCD (Department of Housing and Community Development) to 
replace the boilers at the Authority's 667-1 Deming Way development, replace the emergency 
generator engine at the Authority's 667-2 Deming Way development, upgrade the life-safety and fire 
alarm systems, modify the ventilation systems and extend coverage of the existing sprinkler system 
at the Authority's 667-2 Deming Way development, replace the existing unit and corridor doors to 
fire safe doors at the Authority's 667-2 development and replace a roof at the Authority's 705-1 
scattered sites. The Executive Director has met with Senator Bruce E. Tarr and Representative 
James R. Miceli to seek much needed additional funding; so that additional modifications and much 
needed repairs can be made to the aging Deming Way Complex buildings. Thank you to Senator 
Bruce E. Tarr and Representative James R. Miceli for all their hard work, support and for their 
commitment to the elderly, disabled and families of Wilmington and Massachusetts. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority's Executive Director and the Board of Commissioners would like 
to express our appreciation and thanks to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police Department 
for responding promptly to the many life-threatening situations that we unfortunately have. We 
would also like to thank and express our appreciation to Wilmington Police Officer Butch Alpers, 
Officer Paul Chalifour and the Wilmington Police Union for the tenants' entertainment of "Movie 
Night." We would also like to extend our appreciation and thanks to the Wilmington Department of 
Public Works for their assistance in keeping our roads clear during the inclement weather. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority's Executive Director and the Board of Commissioners would also 
like to give a big "thank you" and express our sincere gratitude to Michael Caira, Town Manager, for 
his assistance and support and to all the town employees who bring a better quality of life to all our 
tenants. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority's Executive Director and the Board of Commissioners would like 
to express our appreciation and thanks to Judy Baggs, Wilmington Town Nurse and the Wilmington 
Board of Health for providing health clinics and seminars to the tenants of the Deming Way 
Complex. 



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New fla^ polo dedicated at the 
Deming Way complex. 



The Wilmington Housing Authority's Executive Director, 
the Board of Commissioners and the Deming Way 
Residents would like to express our sincere gratitude, 
deep appreciation and thank you to Frank Romano, 
owner of the Blaire House in Tewksbury, who unselfishly 
and so graciously donated our new flag pole and flag at 
the Deming Way Complex. This endeavor was a long 
time coming and now, thru the hard work and effort of 
Senator Bruce E. Tarr, Representative James R. Miceli, 
Wilmington Police Officer Butch Alpers, Wilmington 
Police UnionAVilmington Police Department and to our 
donor Blaire House of Tewksbury owner and Vietnam 
Veteran, Frank Romano, this has finally become a reality. 
The new flagpole allows the resident veterans and 
residents of Deming Way to salute and honor the 
American Flag and servicemen who have fought in wars 
and continue to fight in Iraq today, so that we can retain 
our freedom. As Executive Director and an American I 
am a strong supporter of the American Flag and Our 
Servicemen, so I say "God Bless the USA and our 
Servicemen." 



The Wilmington Housing Authority's Executive Director and the Board of Commissioners would also 
Hke to thank all the organizations and groups that have so unselfishly dedicated their time, 
companionship and resources to the Deming Way tenants. These organizations and their members 
have brought tremendous joy, fun and help to the tenants of the Deming Way Complex. 

I would like to express my deep and sincere appreciation and thanks to the Board of Commissioners 
for having me serve as the Executive Director of the Wilmington Housing Authority. 



Finally, and most importantly I would like to express my deep appreciation, sincere gratitude and 
thanks to all the tenants at the Deming Way Complex for their respect, continued support and help 
in improving the quality of life here at the Deming Way Complex. 



Commission on Disabilities 

The Wilmington Commission on Disabilities is a commission established to address issues and 
concerns, as well as advocacy, for people with disabilities, their families and other concerned citizens 
or groups. 

The Commission works collaboratively with the Massachusetts Office on Disability and in 
conjunction with the Northeast Independent Living Program (NILP), attending conferences and 
trainings when appropriate. We follow new legislation affecting the disability community, contact 
our legislators and make sure other proper authorities are also aware. 



The Commission assists residents through information and referral for issues related to home 
accessibility, employment, transportation, service animals and independent hving. 
We continue to survey sites open to the public and assess compUance with architectural accessibility 
for people with physical, visual, hearing or other disabilities in accordance with the Massachusetts 
Architectural Access Regulations and the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act. 



We currently have several openings on the Commission and are looking for interested people. Please 
contact the Town Manager's office for further information. 



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Veterans' Services 



The Department of Veterans' Services serves as an advocate for Wilmington Veterans' and 
dependants. The Department advises Veterans as to the availability of services and federal, state 
and local benefits to which they are entitled. Under the guidance of M.G.L. Chapter 115 the 
Wilmington Department of Veterans' Services (DVS) administers aid to qualified veterans and their 
dependants. The Commonwealth reimburses the town 75% of the cost of this benefits program. The 
Department of Veterans' Services processes annuity payments for disabled Veterans, Gold Star 
parents and spouses, provides assistance in filing tax exemptions and abatements earmarked for 
Veterans and their spouses, assists Veterans in applying for motor vehicle benefits including 
Veterans license plates and processes Welcome Home bonus applications for those who have served 
since September 11, 2001. 

The Department of Veterans' Services office has assisted many Veterans in filing service connected 
and non-service connected disability, aid, attendance and medical care claims and or pensions with 
the Veterans Administration (VA). The Department of Veterans' Services also assisted many 
Veterans to receive educational benefits through the GI bill to further their education. 

The Department of Veterans' Services assisted with the funeral of US Marine Lance Corporal Steven 
M. West who died July 2 in Thailand while on active duty in the Marine Corp. 



The Department of Veterans' Services and The Moving Wall Committee sponsored "The Moving 
Wall" a half size replica of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, DC from September 18 through 
September 22, 2008. Thousands of people visited Wilmington Town Common for the five days it was 
there. Through each of the four ceremonies thousands of residents, neighbors and Veterans paid 
respect and tribute to the fallen heroes listed on the wall. 





The Department of Veterans' Services coordinates public events, such as the dedication of John F. 
Liindry. Jr.. monument located on Main Street at Silver Lake. PFC Landry was killed in action in 
Iraq on March 17, 2007. The Veterans' Monument on the Town Common was rededicated to include 
Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom, Iraq. The Department 
coordinates the Veterans" Day Ceremonies and Memorial Day Parade. It is the responsibility of the 
Department of Veterans' Services to decorate over 1,600 graves at Wilmington's Wildwood Cemetery. 



Our goal is to provide this service with the dignity these men and women have earned through their 
service to our nation. 




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The office of the Board of Health is located in the Town Hall at 121 Glen Road in Room 5 and the 
Public Health Nurse's office is located off of the foyer of the Town Hall. The Board of Health consists 
of three members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. Serving on the 
Board in year 2008 were Elizabeth (Libby) Sabounjian, who served as the Chairman, James 
Ficociello, D.D.S. and Jane Williams-Vale, M.D. The Director of Public Health is Gregory Erickson, 
R.S., C.H.O., the Health Inspector is Shelly Newhouse, R.S., and the Public Health Nurse is Judith 
Baggs, R.N. The Animal Inspector is Ellen Sawyer. The secretary for the Board of Health is Kim 
Mytych. 

The administrative duties of the office include issuing permits, reviewing plans for subdivisions, 
septic systems and other development proposals, issuing enforcement orders and citations, holding 
hearings, keeping records, attending meetings, operation of the Board of Health website and other 
regular administrative duties. The Board of Health meetings were generally held twice monthly, on 
the first and third Tuesday of each month, and usually at 5:30 p.m. Records of all meetings and 
other documents are kept at the office of the Board of Health. 

Environmental field activities included inspection of restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in 
industrial buildings and schools, mobile food trucks, the Fourth of July activities, caterers and other 
temporary food stands, percolation tests and soil evaluations, subsurface sewage disposal system 
inspections, recreational camp inspections, semi-public pool inspections, nuisance complaint 
investigations, hazardous waste investigations, housing inspections, smoking and tobacco law 
enforcement, lake water quality sampling, Canada Geese control, beaver control and other 
miscellaneous investigations and activities. 

The clinical component of the Board of Health is primarily the responsibility of the Public Health 
Nurse. Those responsibilities include communicable disease prevention and follow-up, adult and 
child immunization, Mantoux Skin Testing for Tuberculosis (TB), TB Case Management, health 
screening and prevention and educational programs. 

Weekly screening and educational programs were conducted at the Buzzell Senior Center, monthly 
screening and educational programs at Deming Way Senior Housing, and periodic blood pressure 
screening for A.I.M. (Access is Mandatory for seniors living with challenges) at the Knights of 
Columbus Hall. 

The Public Health Nurse conducted immunizations for Adolescent and Adult Hepatitis A and B, 
Tetanus, Pertussis, Pneumonia and Influenza in homes and in the office. Other services included 
Mantoux Skin Testing for TB, blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and weight screening, 
administration of physician ordered medications, general health assessment and consultation and 
referrals to medical, mental health and social work providers. 

In addition, the Salvation Army Good Neighbor Energy Fund Program was administered, which 
provides fuel and other energy assistance to income eligible residents and other services to provide 
assistance (basic living essentials and comfort and recreation services) to those in need. 

Communicable Diseases reported in 2008 included: Cryptosporidiosis (1), Campylobacter (2), 
Giardia (2), Hepatitis A (1), Hepatitis B (5), Hepatitis C (10), Lyme Disease (20), Viral Meningitis (1), 
Pertussis (4), Streptococcal Pneumonia (4), Salmonella (3), Group B Streptococcus (2) and Latent 
Tuberculosis (6). 



An Employee Health Fair was held on May 7'*' in coordination with the School Health Services 
Director, Doreen Crowe, R.N. Blue Cross Blue Shield provided Skin Cancer screening. Breast 
Cancer, Women's Health, Prostate Cancer, Men's Health, Lung Cancer and Respiratory and 
Cardiovascular Health were featured. Additional screenings were provided for blood pressure, 
cholesterol, blood sugar and weight. 



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The Public Health Nurse participated in the Wilmington Elementary School Health Fair on March 
IS"* with blood pressure screening for students and parents and an American Heart Association 
Cardiac Risk Factor Analysis for parents. 

A second Health and Wellness Program coordinated with Theresa Marciello, Director of Elderly 
Services, resulted from a Massachusetts Department of Public Health grant from the Community 
Health Network Area (CHNA-15), a group of 12 communities that work together to improve 
community health. A Diabetes Awareness program, Wilmington Diabetes Management and 
Sutrition Education, which included monthly blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol and weight 
screenings and lectures on Diabetes started in October 2007 and continued through May 2008. 

Health promotion activities included various screenings, clinics, and education programs, as well as 
on-going activities specific to the Healthy Wilmington Coalition project. 

Public Health Nurse, Judy Baggs, R.N., is active in the Massachusetts Association of Public Health 
Nurses, the Massachusetts Health Officers Association, the Winchester Hospital Community 
Benefits Initiative, the School Health and Wellness Advisory Committee and Community Health 
Network Area (CHNA-15). 

The Health Director led the development of a Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) which is now an ongoing 
project. Both medical and non medical members of the community are encouraged to join and 
become part of a public health emergency response team whose function is to respond to emergencies 
such as bioterrorism, hurricanes and other such disasters. During the November flu clinic, the MRC 
was deployed to assist at the clinic in a simulation of an emergency dispensing site operation. 
During the December ice storm that effected towns to the west of Wilmington, members of our MRC 
responded to the need to staff emergency shelters for those who lost electrical power and home 
heating. 

The Director served on the Executive Committee for the Region 4A Coalition, a group of 34 
communities designated by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH). The coalition 
receives grant funding for local Boards of Health for emergency planning and infrastructure 
improvements for emergency response activities. In 2008 the Board of Health received grants and 
equipment from the region for improvements and upgrades for local emergency planning. The 
Director also served as a member of the Board of Registration of Sanitarians for the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts Division of Professional Licensure and served as a member of the Executive Board 
for the Massachusetts Health Officers Association. 

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) held its annual seminar at the Wilmington Middle 
School. This annual seminar is conducted for health officers in the DEP Northeast Region and is hosted 
each year by the Wilmington Board of Health. 

The Title 5 Septic System Betterment Loan Program, which began in 1999 and continued every year 
thereafter, received funding again in 2005 and was reauthorized in 2008. Loans were made to 
homeowners, which are to be repaid to the town through the betterment process, appearing on the 
regular tax bill. This was made possible by a $200,000 grant from DEP and the Massachusetts 
Environmental Trust and will continue into 2009. 

The Canada Geese Control Program has continued operations throughout the year in cooperation 
with the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

In a continuing effort to control the environmental impact of elemental mercury, residents can 
exchange fever thermometers containing mercury for digital thermometers at no charge at the office 
of the Board of Health. The office will also receive and recycle thermostats and mercury switches 
and any other items which contain mercury. The recycling of fluorescent light tubes containing 
mercury from the schools and public buildings continues and residents can continue to bring compact 
fluorescent lamps to the Aubuchon Hardware store located at 2261 Main Street, Tewksbury for 
recycling. This recycling program is supported by outside funding at no cost to the Town of 
Wilmington. 



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The annual rabies clinic for dogs and cats was held on April 5, 2008 at the Public Buildings 
Department on Church Street. A total of 219 animals (dogs and cats) were inoculated with the 
rabies vaccine by Dr. James Kim of the Wilmington Veterinary Hospital. The next rabies clinic is 
planned to be held on Saturday April 4, 2009. 

In 2008 the Healthy Wilmington Coalition (HWC) implemented the grant from CHNA-15 for the 
clean-up, mapping, posting and promotion of three walking trails, as part of an effort to promote 
exercise and health. On Labor Day, a kick-off event was hosted at the Town Park trail to introduce 
the program to the public. An information kiosk was built at each of the three selected trail sites. 
Town Park, Town Hall and Rotary Park. Dr. Jane Williams-Vale continues to serve as the Coalition 
Chairperson. Information can be found at the HWC website at www.healthywilmingtoncoalition.org. 
The Healthy Wilmington Coalition meets once a month at the Town Hall and members of the 
community are welcome to attend and join the coalition. 

With grant funds from the MDPH the Board of Health purchased two Automatic External 
Defibrillators (AED's) which will be available in the Town Hall and the Buzzell Senior Center. 
AED's can be used by trained personnel in the event of cardiac arrest. 

Funds Collected: 



Medicare B Reimbursement for Influenza 

Nurse's Total Fees Collected (various testing) 

Transport/Haulers Permits 

Animal Permits 

Funeral Homes 

Percolation/Soil Tests 

Sewage Disposal Systems Permits 

Food Establishment Permits 

Tanning Salons 

Installers Licenses 

Subdivision Review 

Photo Copies 

Recreation Camps 

Well Permits 

Rabies Clinic 

Pool Permits 

Housing Inspection Certificate Fee 
Ice Rink 

Tobacco Sales Permits 
TOTAL FEES COLLECTED: 



$ 2,119.98 
33.00 



5.000.00 
$57,273.38 



2,100.00 
11,900.00 
19,000.00 



2,300.00 
2,200.00 



300.00 
3,900.00 



5,800.00 
1,440.00 



200.00 
80.40 
200.00 



200.00 



300.00 
100.00 
100.00 



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Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

In Januan- the Cable TV Advisory Task Force recommended that the Board of Selectmen renew the 
license to provide cable services to Comcast of Massachusetts, Inc. Negotiations with Comcast over 
the terras of a new license were ongoing for over a year. The cable license officially expired in March 
of 2007. At that time Selectmen issued a preliminary denial of the cable renewal license based upon 
the recommendation of the Task Force. Federal cable regulations required that Comcast continue to 
provide cable service to customers after the preliminary license denial. While Comcast had the 
opportunity to appeal the denial to the state Department of Telecommunications and Cable, 
discussions continued throughout 2007. 

As the Task Force met in January differences still remained between the positions of the Town and 
Comcast. Those differences were: (1) the desire on the town's part to implement a senior discount, 
(2) the distance restrictions for a standard residential connection to cable, (3) the town's interest in 
requiring Comcast to provide a set amount of advance notice if Comcast seeks to relocate the PEG 
channels on the channel line-up and (4) the town's interest in requiring Comcast to pay for relocation 
of cable equipment to a new location for WCTV. Comcast and their predecessor cable providers in 
Wilmington have never offered a senior discount to Wilmington residents and they were insistent 
that residents have access to a discounted cable service through the basic cable rate. Ultimately, 
based upon discussions with cable counsel, a determination was made that in light of the prospect of 
success on these issues versus the likely protracted and expensive legal procedure and uncertainty of 
the Department of Telecommunication and Cable decision the best course would be to recommend 
hcense renewal. 

On January 28, 2008 the Board of Selectmen granted a 10-year cable license renewal to Comcast of 
Massachusetts, Inc. The net result of the negotiations is essentially a "maintenance of effort" 
license. The town maintained the requirement that Comcast support the institutional network 
which is a closed loop communication system for town departments. Cable customers will see their 
franchise related costs (FRC) cut in half from 88 cents per month to 44 cents per month. This 
amount represents a "pass through" of costs imposed by the town on Comcast in support of the 
institutional network and local access television (WCTV). Comcast is required to make payments in 
the amount of $210,000 over the duration of the license to Wilmington Community Television 
(WCTV) for purchase of equipment to support coverage of town events, meetings and local 
programming. In addition, Comcast will continue to direct five (5) percent of their gross revenue 
from cable related business to WCTV on a quarterly basis to support the day-to-day operations of 
providing programming on Wilmington's local access channels. 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force resident members A. Quincy Vale and Wayne Aruda stepped down 
from the Task Force once the Comcast license was renewed. The remaining Task Force members are 
Donna Gacek, Executive Director of WCTV, Neal Ellis, Network Manager with the Wilmington 
School Department and Jeffrey M. Hull, Assistant Town Manager. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

James Babineau who served as Sealer of Weights and Measures for the Town for 21 years retired in 
2008. Effective July 1, 2008 the responsibilities of this position have been assumed by 
representatives from the State Division of Standards. The following inspections were conducted by 
the Sealer of Weights and Measures for the Town of Wilmington: 



Inspections Number Sealed 

Observed and monitored oil truck deliveries 6 

Tested and sealed supermarket scales 34 

Tested and sealed pharmacy weights 14 

Tested and sealed truck scales 3 

Tested and sealed gas station meters 144 

Conducted random inspections of gas stations 6 

Acted on complaints 9 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures maintains fairness in the marketplace. 



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EDUCATION 




Educating Wilmington's children and young people is the most intense activity in which the town 
engages. Each day that school is in session, teachers face students who are daunting in the diversity 
of their backgrounds, needs, personalities and learning styles. Notwithstanding this diversity, the 
teacher educates all. 

Replicate sufficient teachers for more than 3,800 students; support students so they learn; support 
teachers so they can teach; demand a broad, modern curriculum; demand high-performance 
instruction; evaluate instructional quality; meet proliferating state and federal mandates; and then 
get the job done on a budget that contains no fat. This is your Wilmington Public School System. Be 
proud of it. 

The district's Strategic Plan began its third year acting as the guide for the Wilmington Public 
Schools' improvement efforts. The strategic plan is rooted in the mission of the Wilmington Public 
Schools which states: 

The Wilmington Public Schools will provide a student centered education which fosters critical 
inquiry enabling the individual to be a productive citizen, respectful of self and others, capable of 
adapting to a changing world and its technology. 

The district's curriculum renewal model insures that the district's curriculum renewal/development 
process maintains a five-year cyclical schedule of evaluation, review, adjustment and 
implementation for each content area. During 2008 the Fine and Performing Arts, Health and 
Physical Education, English Language Arts, Foreign Language and Science Curriculum Review 
Committees are all involved in some level of renewal work. The curriculum team leaders and subject 
area liaisons work with teachers and the assistant superintendent reviewing new trends and issues 
in each subject area, developing a belief and direction philosophy, conducting needs assessments and 
learning about more effective methods of student assessment. 

One critical task of the Curriculum Review Committee is to insure that the school district's 
curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. The Frameworks are the 
basis of the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS). It is important that 
Wilmington's students are thoroughly prepared to face the challenges of the MCAS. Competency 
requirements have been increased by the Massachusetts Board of Education. The current 1 1'** 
graders at Wilmington High School will have to demonstrate MCAS competencies in English, 
mathematics and now science in addition to meeting Wilmington High School's requirements in 
order to receive a diploma. 

According to Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) data and the MCAS, Wilmington students are 
performing well in English and mathematics. Wilmington's AYP performance ratings are very high 
in English and high in mathematics. MCAS data indicates consistently improving mathematics 
skills in grades 3 through 8 from 2006 through 2008. The percentage of Wilmington Middle School 
students who performed at the advanced and proficient levels during the past three years has 
increased each year; at grade six from 69% to 75%; at grade seven from 36% to 61%; at grade eight 
from 42% to 56%. During the same three year period the percentage of students performing at the 
advanced level increased from 25% to 40% at grade six. The grade seven students performing at the 
advanced level increased from 10% to 19%. The grade eight percentages of students performing at 
the advanced level increased from 10% to 20%. 

At the district's intermediate and elementary schools similar success is apparent. At the West and 
North Intermediate Schools the percentage of grade four students who performed at the advanced 
and proficient levels during the past three years has increased from 48% to 54%. In grade five the 
combined percentage of students performing at the advanced and proficient levels rose from 53% to 



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62"p. Performance data from grade three students at the Shawsheen and Woburn Street Schools 
over the three year period represents an increase of 56% to 67% of the students performing at the 
advanced or proficient levels. 

Wilmington High School students continue to distinguish themselves by their MCAS performance in 
English and mathematics. During the past three years the percentage of 10"^ grade students who 
have performed at the advanced or proficient levels in English has increased from 86% of the 
students to 90% in 2008. During that same time the percentage of lO"' grade English students 
performing at the advanced level has increased from 20% to 34%. In mathematics the average 
percent of 10'*^ grade students who scored at the advanced or proficient levels is 89% during the three 
years. During the past three years, an average of 63% of the 10"' graders has performed at the 
advanced level in mathematics. 

The professional growth of Wilmington's instructional staff is critical to accomplishing the school 
district's goals. The purpose of the school district's professional development planning is to provide a 
structured, supportive and collaborative environment that promotes professional learning to enhance 
the quality of instruction and enrich student learning. Research indicates that student growth and 
development is directly connected to teachers' learning and growth. As a result of Superintendent 
Benton declaring this year as TTie Year of Technology Integration, much of the district's professional 
development offerings were related to enhancing teacher instruction and enriching student learning 
by integrating information technologies. In the early fall, Dr. Alan November, an international 
leader in education technology, addressed all Wilmington staff. He challenged the Wilmington staff 
to consider different ways to improve teaching and learning via technology and creative and 
intelligent uses of the Internet. On November 4 the district's staff was enrolled in all day technology 
integration workshops. Nearly 100% of the workshop leaders were Wilmington teachers. This is a 
desirable characteristic of a culture of continuous learning; teachers teaching teachers. 

The district recognizes the financial strain that everyone is experiencing and therefore has increased 
its efforts to secure grant funds. This year a total of $1,393,105.00 was received in grant funds 
compared to $1,247,923.00 the previous year. 

Two non-profit organizations, the Wilmington School Business Partnership and the Wilmington 
Education Foundation, pursue and distribute funds from private sources to supplement the Town's 
funding of its public schools. Funds raised by both these organizations help to provide the school 
children with tools needed to learn more effectively and the teachers with resources that enhance 
their instruction. 

The district's Strategic Plan and the School Improvement Plan will continue to evolve in response to 
changing conditions and new data. However, the commitment to relentlessly improving learning 
environments where all students succeed will continue. As Superintendent Benton regularly 
reminds her staff "we can make a difference in the lives of all the students in the Wilmington Public 
Schools." 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Wilmington High School continues to make forward progress. The Business Department has been 
redesigned and we are offering many different elective courses to our students. We have also 
incorporated Virtual High School (VHS) into the curriculum. VHS is an online program that allows 
our students to take over 300 courses with students around the world via home, school or library 
computers. Many students have chosen courses they would not be able to take at Wilmington High 
School including, Zoology and Irish Literature. We look forward to the expansion of VHS as a great 
global connection for our students. 

The 2008-09 school year marks the start of the accreditation process for Wilmington High School. 
Thus ten year process helps us to identify our strengths and weaknesses and to develop a plan of 
action for the future. Our teachers and administrators have been grouped by the seven standards 
and have started to write the required reports. Each of the reports will be reviewed by the entire 
staff and voted for acceptance into the final report. In March of 2010, a team of fifteen educators 



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from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges will visit our school for four days to 
examine our reports and compare the results to their own findings. They will interview teachers, 
students, parents and community people so they can gather information that will be used to decide if 
we continue to hold accreditation. We look forward to the visit! 

This year, we have one member of our faculty retiring, Ms. Gayle Masse. Her service and 
commitment to the students of Wilmington spans many years and will be very difficult to duplicate. 
We wish Ms. Masse well! 

Business Department 

The Wilmington High School Business Department has been redesigned and restructured as we 
continue to educate our students to meet the challenges of our highly technological society in 
business, industry and post-secondary education. 

Wilmington High School graduates, through the varied business and technology classes, will learn to 
apply technologies to conduct research, enhance productivity, create and communicate via written, 
visual and multimedia presentations. 

New courses offered during the 2008-2009 school year include: Accounting, Business and Personal 
Law, Computer Applications, DesktopAVeb Publishing, Entrepreneurship, Financial Literacy, 
Introduction to Business, Marketing Management and a School to Careers Internship Program. 

All of the business classes at Wilmington High School offer a challenging curriculum that fosters 
critical thought providing opportunities for problem solving and coiirse mastery. The DECA Club, 
an association of marketing students, enhances the co-curricular education of students with interest 
in marketing, management and entrepreneurship. Students enrolled in approved business courses 
may become members of the DECA Club. DECA's objective is to support the development of 
marketing and management skills in career areas such as hospitality, finance, sales and service, 
business administration and entrepreneurship. Programs and activities are tailored to the specific 
career interest of students and include technical skills, basic scholastic and communication skills, 
human relations and employability skills and a strong emphasis on economics and free enterprise. 
The DECA Club and related courses help students to develop skills and competence for marketing 
careers, to build self-esteem, to experience leadership and to practice community service. DECA is 
committed to the advocacy of marketing education and the growth of business/education 
partnerships. 

In 2008, twenty-five members of the Wilmington DECA Chapter entered competitions at the District 
and State level and five students qualified for the International Career Development Conference in 
Atlanta, Georgia in April. Wilmington is back on the map with DECA. 

The Business Department will begin the first year of curriculum renewal in the 2009-2010 school 
year. The focus will be on curriculum, instruction and assessment of the current business offerings 
as well as student needs. The business department will foster and design challenging curriculum 
with continued emphasis on curriculum, instruction and assessment. We will continue to align all 
business course curriculums to the Mission Statement of Wilmington High School. It is the goal of 
Wilmington High School to provide a student-centered education that promotes academic, personal 
and social growth and achievement for all learners. 

English Department 

The Wilmington Public Schools 6-12 English Department believes we can stimulate our students by 
providing them with opportunities to read and analyze diverse literature and to use language 
creatively and powerfully when writing and speaking. With an emphasis on helping students 
develop strengths as critical thinkers and effective communicators and providing a strong foundation 
of reading and writing skills, the 6-12 English curriculum will prepare students to meet their next 
level of challenges. 



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Tho 2008-2009 school year is the department's second year of curriculum renewal. The renewal 
committee is comprised of 6-12 English Curriculum Team Leader Lisa Lucia, high school English 
teachers Lisa Bellavia, Catherine Daley, Claire Hitschler, Maura Lynch and Mia Parviainen and 
middle school English teacher Michael Mahoney. The committee is committed to the study and 
evaluation of the following: assessing the department's formally stated needs, adopting the 
department generated beliefs and direction statement, developing content standards to coincide with 
state frameworks and curriculum maps, beginning staff development, writing curriculum guides, 
continuing field testing, aligning the department's curriculum with year three of the system's 
Strategic Plan and at the high school, aligning the curriculum with the mission and expectations of 
the school. 

These aforementioned areas will be studied and evaluated with forward thinking in mind for 
instructional material review, implementation and evaluation in years 3, 4 and 5, respectively of the 
Protocol for Curriculum Renewal and Management. 

The following contributions of the English Department members make a strong impact on 
curriculum renewal and other curriculum efforts; as a result, instruction and assessment are 
improving student learning. 

We welcome Ms. Lisa Bellavia, Ms. Marissa Bortone and Ms. Mia Parviainen as Wilmington High 
School English teachers. Ms. Lisa Bellavia & Ms. Mia Parviainen advise the high school's literary 
magazine. Expressions. Ms. Parviainen recently had an award winning article entitled "The 
Experiences of Women in Computer Science: The Importance of Awareness and Communication" 
published in a scholarly magazine. Mrs. Claire Hitschler organizes the Literature for the English 
and Social Studies Classroom workshop. This year's focus is Cultural and Historical literary pieces. 
Mrs. Hitschler, along with Mrs. Lucia, also led a workshop on Teaching and Assessing Writing for 
middle and high school English, History and Special Education teachers. 

Veteran AP English teacher Mr. Joe Kleponis is a published poet with a specialty in Haiku and 
Tanka. 

Ms. Catherine Daley attended The Best New Young Adult Books 2009 Workshop. Mr. John Lewis 
wrote "On the Road" as an English elective. Students who participate in this course engage in 
additional texts and culture not covered in required English courses. This class will benefit the 
students academically, socially and civilly by allowing them to develop into cultured individuals with 
knowledge of historical, local and global issues through literature. 

Ms. Maureen Dolan wrote "Film Studies" as a year-long English elective in which students achieve 
academic, personal and social growth by strengthening their visual literacy skills through an in- 
depth study of film. This course combines a historical survey of American motion pictures with a 
study of genres and themes. 

Mrs. Lucia co-wrote "Facing History and Ourselves," an inter-disciplinary semester elective course, 
with Mrs. Maura Tucker of the History Department. This course explores the emergence, evolution 
and underlying causes of genocide and crimes against humanity in the 20'*' and 2P' centuries. 

In addition to the ones mentioned, the high school's English Department also offers the following 
electives: Creative Writing taught by Ms. Parviainen, Expository Writing taught by Ms. Lynch and 
Language Arts Workshop taught by Mr. Lewis. 

Foreign Language Department 

The Foreign Language Department welcomed two new teachers for the 2008-2009 school year. Ms. 
Meghan Lynch is a graduate of UMass Amherst and received a Master's degree from Elms College. 
She also studied in Spain and taught previously at Chicopee Comprehensive High School. This year, 
Ms. Lynch is teaching second and third year Spanish at Wilmington High School. Ms. Rebecca 
Hoffman, a graduate of St. Anslem's College, is teaching first and second year Spanish at 
Wilmington High School. Ms. Hoffman is currently enrolled in the MAT in Spanish program at 
Salem State College. 



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A new AP Spanish program was introduced in the fall of 2008. AP Spanish is being taught by Ms. 
Terresa Pietro who attended a week-long training session in July at St. Johnsbury Academy. Ms. 
Pietro also co-chairs the Foreign Language Club at Wilmington High School which has over 60 
members who meet once a month to learn about other cultures and sample traditional foods from 
countries around the world. In December, club members hosted a Holiday Breakfast for faculty and 
staff. The club's International Culture Fest, a celebration of diversity at Wilmington High School 
with traditional foods, entertainment and booths representing many nations, will be held on March 
14 in the Wilmington High School Cafeteria. This year the Foreign Language Department is 
offering both Italian 1 and Italian 2 classes, taught by Mr. Daniel Indiciani, who will be leading a 
group of students to three cities, (Rome, Florence and Venice) in Italy over the February vacation. 
The Italian program is funded in part by a grant from the Centro Attivita Scolastiche Italiane 
(C.A.S.I.T.). 

The 2008-2009 school year is the department's third year of curriculum renewal. The renewal 
committee is comprised of 6-12 Curriculum Team Leader Joyce Beckwith, Wilmington High School 
teachers Daniel Indiciani, Meghan Lynch, Terresa Pietro and Joanne Veliz and Wilmington Middle 
School teacher Cynthia Irish. This year the committee is reviewing instructional materials and 
developing assessments. 

Guidance Department 

The Wilmington High School Guidance Department continues its work towards introducing new 
initiatives and maintaining established programs that benefit our students and their families. In 
the spring of 2008, the counselors collaborated in the creation of a comprehensive guide for students 
designed to be a roadmap for the college process. The Wilmington High School College Planning 
Guide, distributed to the Class of 2009 in April during Junior Seminars, received positive feedback 
and has become a handbook for our students. The second annual Senior Parents' Breakfast, 
sponsored by the high school counselors in late September, provided an open forum where 80 parents 
asked questions about college application procedures. Students continue to access the ACT college 
testing program as an alternative to the SAT alone. Our on-site testing program for the 2008-2009 
academic year began in October with the PSAT, which was administered to 209 Grade 10 and 11 
students, followed by SAT testing for Seniors in November. On October 27, the Wilmington High 
School Guidance Department co-sponsored the regional College Fair at the Shriners' Auditorium. In 
early November, a representative from UMass Lowell, in conjunction with the counselors, presented 
a comprehensive program describing the financial aid process, an event that was well attended by 
our Grade 11 and Grade 12 parents. Two On-the-Spot Admissions events brought two local colleges, 
UMass Lowell and Salem State College, to Wilmington High School for interviews and admissions 
decisions. At this event, 72 students were granted admission to these fine institutions. On January 
7th Wilmington High School Guidance Department presented the second annual Alumni Roundtable, 
a program that invites members of the Class of 2008 to return to Wilmington High School to share 
their college experiences with our current seniors and juniors. 

After much research, the Guidance staff chose to partner with "Connect!" a web-based college 
admissions access program. This program, which is used by a number of area high schools, is in the 
implementation stage and will be an asset to counselors in the processing of college applications. In 
addition, this program offers a component that allows parents access to information about student 
appUcations in process. To date, the Wilmington High School counseling staff has processed over 
720 college applications. In addition to UMass Lowell and Salem State College, Wilmington High 
School students have received acceptance to many prestigious schools including Boston College, 
Georgetown University, American University, St. Michael's College, University of South Carolina, 
Savannah School of Art and Design, Assumption College, University of New Hampshire, University 
of Connecticut, UMass Amherst, UMass Dartmouth, and the University of Vermont. In late 
January, the Guidance staff will introduce to the students in the Class of 2011 a web-based vehicle 
for career exploration, "Career Cruising," which offers interest inventories and career information for 
students to facilitate future planning. 



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\fathematu\-t Dt-partment 

The Mathomatios Department at Wilmington High School is comprised of 11 full-time teachers, each 
teaching five classes and one Curriculum Team Leader who teaches three classes. We have two new 
members of the Mathematics Department this year that have come to us with experience from the 
Lawrence and Peabody school systems. 

The courses offered in the Mathematics Department range from Algebra 1 through AP Calculus. A 
large percentage of Wilmington High School students complete four years of mathematics, although 
the requirement is three years. At this time our current sophomores, juniors and seniors complete 
their three year program with Algebra 2 and may choose a fourth year of mathematics from one of 
our senior electives which include Programming, Algebra 3, Advanced Math Topics, Pre Calculus, 
Trigonometry, Probability & Statistics, Honors Calculus AB and AP Calculus AB. Many of our 
current ninth graders have completed Algebra 1 in grade 8 and are enrolled in Geometry this year. 
They will advance to Algebra 2 as sophomores and will have the opportunity to expand their 
mathematics experience beyond Algebra 2 as juniors. We anticipate a revision to our High School 
Mathematics Program over the next several years as we anticipate the need to expand our offerings 
and begin our curriculum renewal process. We have begun this revision by adding a full year of 
Statistics to our program for the 2009-2010 school year. 

Our students continue to improve in our standardized testing. MCAS results were very positive 
again this year with almost 90% of our tenth graders achieving either in the Proficient or Advanced 
status. We continue to offer a "Math Workshop" course to our tenth graders as a preparation for the 
May exams. This course is designed to reinforce skills and to develop test-taking strategies. We also 
offer opportunities for extra preparation for eligible students through our Academic Support Services 
Program which is offered three different times during the school year as well as over the summer 
months. This program is funded by a grant which has been approved by the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. 

Our Advanced Placement testing in Calculus AB also demonstrates positive results with 75% of 
those tested achieving a qualifying score on the 2008 exams. 

Science Department 

In 2008 the high school science program began to reap the benefits of its efforts on curriculum 
renewal with the adoption and purchase of selected textbooks and laboratory supplies. Physical 
Science, Biology and Chemistry texts, selected and endorsed by teachers, were put into service in 
several courses. New materials were selected based upon alignment with State learning standards, 
local curriculum, assessment support and technology integration. The Physical Science program also 
benefited from the purchase of laboratory materials from Cambridge Physics Outlet. Sufficient CPO 
lab kits were purchased to insure that students could work in groups of two insuring maximum 
engagement and inquiry-based participation. The Physical Science teachers also engaged in six days 
of professional development centered on the use of the materials. 

The Science Department was awarded a MassBioEd Grant in the spring of 2008. Science 
Curriculum Team Leader, Jim Megyesy, authored the grant proposal in January and received word 
in May of the award. The grant provided $8,000 in Biotechnology and Biology laboratory supplies 
plus professional development support for three Biology teachers. Mr. Megyesy named 
Biotechnology teacher Dawn Martell as the primary contact to select materials and manage the 
award benefits. This was the second time that the Science Department had been awarded a 
Massachusetts Biotechnology grant. The first award, granted in 2003, was used to initiate the 
Biotechnology program at the high school. Another new program at the high school came late in the 
spring as a pilot program from Cambridge-based TERC (Technical Education Research Center). The 
course is titled BioComplexity and is being taught for the first time by Physical Science and 
Aquaculture instructor Carol Mutchler. The course is designed to promote students use of World- 
wide GIS databases to investigate environmental/ecological problems. One example of the work 
done in the course was students' participation in the World Water Monitoring project which saw 
them collect data from water sources in Wilmington and registering them in an international 
database - effectively putting Wilmington on the global environmental "map" for the first time. 



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In summary, the science program at both the middle and high school continues to benefit from initiatives 
associated with curriculum renewal. 

Social Studies Department 

The Wilmington High School Social Studies Department is offering two new semester electives for the 
2008-2009 school year: 

Facing History and Ourselves is an interdisciplinary course co-taught by teachers from the English and 
Social Studies Departments. The course explores the emergence, evolution and underlying causes of 
genocide and crimes against humanity in the 20'^'' and 21^* centuries. Using the Holocaust and other case 
studies, students in the course examine the origins of the atrocities, the role ordinary citizens played and 
what we can do today to prevent these crimes from happening again. 

World War II is a course taught purely by the Social Studies Department. In this course, students 
examine the diplomatic and military aspects of World War II as well as how it affected the lives of the 
people in the countries involved. Topics of the course include the prelude to the war, military campaigns 
in Europe and the Pacific, the Holocaust, science and the atom bomb, the U.S. home front and the 
immediate and long term consequences of the war. 

Special Education 

The Wilmington High School Special Education Department provides speciahzed services to students 
with disabilities at the high school level. The services are provided by nine teachers, six classroom 
educational assistants, four one-to-one educational assistants, a school social worker, a sign language 
interpreter, a speech and language pathologist, a physical therapist, an occupational therapist, 
behaviorists, school psychologists and EMARC vocational specialists. Services for individual students 
are determined by a team and documented in an Individual Education Program following State and 

Federal regulations. ^—^—mmBmi^mmmmm^^m,mmmmmmmm,^tmmmmmtmmamrTm!mmm-mmm^mm^^ 



Wilmington High School Faculty. 



WILMINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Wilmington Middle School, according to its annual School Improvement Plan, continues to strive for 
improvement in the areas of student performance, curriculum and instruction and school climate. 
Results of the May 2008 MCAS show improvement in mathematics for aU learners. In fact, Wilmington 
Middle School has met its goal from the previous school year by achieving Adequate Yearly Progress in 
math. This expectation set forth by the State must now be met for English Language Arts. Faculty 
members consistently use Curriculum Improvement Time and department meetings to refine and 
improve the Middle School's curricula for sixth, seventh and eighth grade. In September of 2008, the 
entire school population came together to create Community Quilts. Students and staff alike designed 
their own "quilt squares" that represented them as individuals. The quilts were then constructed, by the 
Student Council and volunteers, in order to demonstrate how we can be respectful of our individual 
differences within our school community. These unique and colorful Community Quilts are now proudly 
displayed in our cafeteria. 



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In 2008. the Middle School implemented a new master schedule that allows for more instructional 
mnuitos in the core subject areas of mathematics, English Language Arts, social studies, science and 
work! languages. In addition, our 968 students continue to be offered a rich curriculum with a variety of 
courses, such as: computer literacy, music, visual arts, media, physical education/health, technology 
education and the performing arts. With over one hundred staff members, we work to meet the needs of 
our students academically, socially and emotionally, during the ever-changing developmental period of 
early adolescence. 

We foster collaborative working relationships with many local businesses and organizations, including 
Wilmington Family Counsehng, Textron Systems, the Town Crier, the Wilmington Memorial Library, 
Analog De\ices and the Wilmington Educational Foundation. With the support and guidance of these 
groups, and our generous Parent Advisory Council, we are fortunate to offer students a plethora of extra- 
curricular activities, including the Mentoring Program, Future Scientists and Engineers of America, 
Student Council, Math Club, Art Club, Yearbook and the Paw Prints newspaper. It is important that 
our students feel a sense of belonging and a sense of pride in our school. With the aforementioned 
activities, our school is buzzing with activity from 1:40-3:00 each afternoon. 

In 2008, several longstanding educators retired from their service to the Wilmington Public Schools: Jim 
Tildsley, Assistant Principal; Joanne Phillips, teacher of Enghsh and Karen Larrabee, art teacher. 
These educators gave many years, invaluable guidance and much dedication to the children of 
Wilmington. 



English Department 

We welcome Ms. Erica Pasquarelli as an 8''' grade Wilmington Middle School English teacher. 



Mr. Michael Mahoney organizes the literature for the Middle School Classroom workshop. Mr. Mahoney 
also is the founder and advisor of the middle school newspaper, Paw Prints. Paw Prints is published bi- 
monthly in the Town Crier, Wilmington's weekly newspaper which has a 15,000 person readership. The 
Paw Prints staff has had nearly 40 students and has gone from black and white to color; it is one of the 
few middle/high school student-run newspapers in the country that is published in an actual newspaper. 

Ms. Jeanne McGonagle attended a workshop, "The Best New Young Adult Books 2009." The 
presentation and resource handbook included annotated lists of books: new books, books for reluctant 
readers, read-alouds and teachable novels. The books are leveled by Middle, Junior and Senior High. 
The handbook includes multiple genres: fiction, poetry, non-fiction, short story collections and novels in 

verse. 





Middle School students interview Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
Michael J. Newhouse and Town Manager Michael A Caira. 



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Science Department 



In the middle school, new textbooks were purchased based upon recommendations of the Secondary 
Science Review Committee and with the unanimous endorsement of the middle school science 
teachers. The textbook series, Pearson Science Explorer, was selected for its alignment with State 
learning standards and local curriculum. The adoption comes with several important curriculum 
resources including technology-integrated lesson planning and assessment tools, video and DVD 
laboratory demonstrations and inquiry prompts as well as online textbooks and classroom 
management tools. The classroom management tools will allow teachers to register their students 
online for countless Internet learning supports including tutorials, web quests, online assessment, 
etc. Students' access to an online textbook wiU help to address the needs of students who require a 
second text and provide ready access to the textbook for parents to investigate as well. The textbook 
series was also accompanied by professional development support for teachers to insure that they are 
able to make full use of the program features and technology supports. 

Social Studies Department 

The Middle School Social Studies Department is in the process of selecting a new Geography 
textbook to be implemented at the start of the 2009-2010 school year. The Seventh Grade 
Geography teachers and a representative of the Special Education Department, along with the Social 
Studies Curriculum Team Leader and the Assistant Superintendent, met with various publishers in 
November to review and examine existing Geography textbook programs. Two finalists have been 
selected and will be piloted by the Geography teachers in early 2009 as part of the final decision- 
making process. 

Special Education Department 



The Wilmington Middle School Special Education Department provides specialized services to 
students with disabilities at the middle school level. The services are provided by 12 special 
education teachers, classroom educational assistants, one-to-one educational assistants, speech and 
language pathologists, a school social worker, school psychologists, behaviorists, a physical therapist, 
and an occupational therapist. Services for individual students are determined by a team and 
documented in an Individual Education Program following State and Federal regulations. 

NORTH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 



There are currently 335 students at the North Intermediate School in grades 4 and 5. There are 
eight fourth grade classrooms, seven fifth grade classrooms, and one 502.4 Special Education 
classroom at the school. Students have access to a broad academic curriculum that includes 
Reading/Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science. Students also participate in a variety of 
specialist periods each week. Music, Art, Physical Education, Library /Media, Health and D.A.R.E. 
provide students with a well-rounded curriculum. 

We are in the seventh year of the Trail Blazers math program and work continues in this area under 
the direction of our Elementary Math Coordinator, Mrs. Terri Buscemi. This is the fourth year of 
implementation of the Houghton Mifflin Reading Program, under the direction of the Elementary 
Literacy Coordinator, Mr. Gerald LaPointe. These programs are aligned to the Massachusetts 
Frameworks and provide instruction, practice and assessment of the framework's standards. 



We continue to work to update and improve our Technology program. Mrs. Peachey, our Library- 
Media instructor has expanded utilization of our E-Instruction Classroom Performance System 
(CPS) in her classes. This interactive technology allows students to respond to curriculum questions 
in real-time using individual "clickers." It also allows the instructor to gather individual and group 
assessment data instantaneously. A laptop computer was purchased to use with the CPS system in 
order to allow for greater portability. This year students are working on a new web-based program 
entitled "Brainchild" as a means of preparing for MCAS testing. A projector, purchased by the 



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Parent Advisory Council, has been ceiling- mounted permanently in our computer lab. Two of our 
teachors received Technolo{i>- Mini-(Jr;ints this past year. Mrs. Bendel purchased portable weather 
stations to augment her Science curriculum. Mrs. Lojek obtained an "Elmo" Digital Document camera 
with her grant funds. We continue to seek additional ways to upgrade the technological services, 
equipment and programs at the North Intermediate School. 

Our students, once again, participated in the Outdoor Life program. This alternative curriculum 
presents Grade 5 students with a comprehensive, hands-on learning model that integrates all the major 
subjects through engagement in a variety of outdoor activities. Once again the program, which takes 
place at Camp Forty Acres, was run in the fall rather than the spring. A one-day follow-up will take 
place in the spring. Students will return to explore the vernal pools which are only observable at that 
time of the year. 

North Intermediate students continue to participate in the Math Facts Challenge. Students are 
evaluated, on a weekly basis, on their ability to complete math facts problems in a timely manner. 
Students are tested in the four basic math operations (addition, subtraction, multipUcation and division). 
As they successfully complete each operation they are rewarded by their classroom teachers with a 
pencil which recognizes their achievement. When all four operations have been successfully mastered 
students are awarded a certificate and have their name and picture added to our "Math Facts 
Superstars" bulletin board. 

The North Intermediate School continues to use Peer Mediation as an effective means of helping 
students resolve conflicts in a peaceful manner. Empowering children to talk through their problems, 
with the support of their peers, and to formulate mutually acceptable solutions has proven to be a highly 
effective means of deterring future conflicts in our school. 

This year we have begun a Grade 5 Student Advisory Council. Representatives were elected from each 
classroom. These representatives meet periodically with the principal to discuss school- wide issues that 
impact their school. Empowering students to have a voice in school decisions has proven to be an 
effective way to improve school climate. 



The North has partnered with the Lowell Five 
Cents Savings Bank this year to offer our 
students an opportunity to open "Smart Save" 
savings accounts. This program is designed to 
help students learn about the importance of 
saving at an early age. Many of our students 
have taken advantage of this opportunity to 
save with an interest-bearing, free passbook 
savings account. Students simply bring their 
deposits to school each Tuesday. A courier from 
the bank picks them up and deposits them at 
the bank. The courier returns on Thursdays 
"Quilling Through The Years" with students from the summer with receipts for the students that made 
CARES program. deposits that week. 

Safety continues to be a high priority at the North Intermediate School. In order to ensure the 
continuous improvement of these practices the safety committee meets regularly to discuss ways to 
implement new procedures to address our changing needs. One addition to our safety program this past 
year was the installation of a video monitor in the office so people approaching the front entrance can be 
identified. A buzzer has been installed so the door can be unlocked once security has been cleared. We 
have continued the process of providing room keys to all teachers and staff members and to require all 
volunteers complete CORl forms and all staff members wear I.D. badges. Visitors and volunteers are 
also required to wear badges whenever they are in the building for any reason and all staff members are 
required to have CORl checks completed. Various fire and 




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emergency drills are conducted regularly to ensure readiness in the case of a real emergency. We are 
planning to participate in an evacuation driU at some point later this year, now that that plan has 
been fully developed. It is an ongoing goal of the North Intermediate School and the Wilmington 
Public Schools to anticipate any possible emergency situation and to develop a plan to ensure the 
safety of all students and school personnel. 

The North Intermediate School is extremely appreciative of the PAC for its ongoing generous 
support of our school and its programs. The fundraising activities they sponsor each year generate a 
considerable amount of money for programs and materials that benefit the school and enhance the 
curriculum. They provide enrichment programs for our students and generously purchase a variety 
of materials for the school. The North Intermediate School is grateful for the hard work and support 
of the PAC. We recognize it is the combined efforts of parents and teachers that create an 
atmosphere for learning which strives to meet the needs of each child and fosters the well-being and 
success of all students. 

WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL 

The West Intermediate School prides itself on creating a positive environment; greeting children by 
name and making each child feel valued as members of the school community. The West 
Intermediate School staff is always working together to improve the quality of instruction and the 
service to children. We had several changes in the staff in the year 2008. New staff members this 
year include Abby Kacamburas in Grade 5, Amy Simmons in Grade 4, Michelle Scardina in Special 
Education and Amanda Burbank in Music. 

Staff members participated in a variety of professional development activities that support the 
District Strategic Plan and the North/West Intermediate Schools Improvement Plan. These 
professional development activities include differentiation, responding to Open Response questions 
and integrating technology into everyday classroom teaching. We also switched our web-based 
curriculum support to a new program called "Brainchild", which allows students to work individually 
on strengthening their skills in math and language arts. 

In the classrooms, aside from everyday lessons, we participated in many additional activities. An 
important goal at the West Intermediate School is to instill in the children a sense of personal 
achievement and social awareness. To this end, we had Explorer Day, Poetry Day and Math 
Immersion Day, participation in Wilmington Fire Department's Tovs for Children In Need, collecting 
food for the local Food Pantry, the annual Winter Coat Drive sponsored by Anton's cleaners and 
continued participation in Box Tops for Education. 

The students of Room 107 staged a homecoming surprise for fifth grader Matt Coleman, who's Dad 
completed his tour of duty overseas in November. Mr. Coleman was able to slip into the classroom 
and sit in Matt's seat while he was out at recess. When Matt came in, his family, classmates and 
news cameras greeted him. Everyone in attendance was provided with a cherished memory. 

One of our classroom teachers, Erin Healey, was awarded one of only two Fund for Teachers grants, 
sponsored by the Wilmington Education Foundation. This grant enabled Erin to travel cross-country 
this past summer and visit many Native American sites and reservations, capturing photographs 
and securing artifacts to enhance the Grade 5 Social Studies unit on our Native American culture. 
She incorporated her information into a teaching format using CPS technology to engage the 
children. 

The Wilmington CARES program operates daily from the West Intermediate School and is an 
integral part of our school community. This year, Kelley Torpey took over as site coordinator at the 
West Intermediate School. In addition to regular daily activities, she has also arranged for the 
children to attend sessions at GymStreet USA and for groups of children to spend time working on 
crafts projects at the Wilmington Health Care Center, which is a nursing home and rehabilitative 
center. 



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The Sh;i\vsheen/\Vest PAC continues to support grades one to five at both the Shawsheen 
Eleniontarv and West Intermediate Schools. They provide Student Planners for every child in the 
building. They fund enrichment programs, which included Mister Magnet, Techsploration/Simple 
Machines, Go for the Stars and a motivational presentation by Molly Sliney, two-time Olympic 
medalist in fencing. The PAC also organized additional activities such as the Ice Cream Social, 
Holiday Gift Fair, Grade 5 Student Yearbook and Family Game Night. 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Shawsheen Elementary School is one of the primary schools that houses students in grades one 
through three. We have seven classrooms at each grade level. There are two special education 
classrooms; one is a multi-grade language based classroom serving students with academic 
challenges and the other is a classroom serving students who have a diagnosis that falls within the 
Autism Spectrum. In addition to the 21 general education teachers and two special education 
teachers, we have many support staff including reading specialists, learning specialists, a speech and 
language pathologist, a guidance counselor, a school secretary, a school nurse, a physical therapist, 
unified arts teachers (music, art and health/physical education) and a librarian. All of the staff 
members continue to be committed to designing instruction that addresses and meets the diverse 
needs of the student population. 

The staff strives to provide positive and productive learning experiences for students by creating 
lessons that challenge their abilities while making the learning fun and rewarding. The lessons 
follow the prescribed curriculum of the Wilmington Public Schools, focusing on the content areas of 
readingAanguage arts, mathematics, social studies and science. It is our goal to assist all students in 
maximizing their learning potentials as they participate daily in challenging instruction and thought 
provoking activities planned by the staff. 

To support and enhance student experiences with the curriculum, the school offers many other 
academic programs. Throughout the school year, the students are presented with a "Math Word of 
the Week," to strengthen their mathematical vocabulary and understanding of concepts. At the end 
of each week, we conduct a math drawing where all students have an opportunity to demonstrate 
their understanding of the word by responding to a math question focused on the word. A lucky 
winner is chosen from each grade level and rewarded with special prizes. Students continue to work 
diligently on the Math Facts Challenge Program, helping them to learn their basic math facts. As 
they pass timed tests in the different mathematical operations, they receive a certificate and pencil 
for their efforts, as they work toward making the Math Facts Honor Roll. The Shawsheen School 
continues to witness a large percentage of students who achieve honor roll status. 

Each year the Shawsheen Elementary School provides a Reading Incentive Program. This program 
asks the students to read nightly in order to reach a designated goal of a specific number of hours of 
reading to earn an incentive by the end of the school year. This past school year the program was 
called "Dive into Reading." If the students attained the goal of the numbers of hours they needed to 
read, their incentive was to have an opportunity to dunk the principal in a water tank. As further 
incentive, the classrooms who clocked the most reading hours during each month of the program 
were given a chance to practice their aim by throwing water balloons at a target. A picture of the 
class was also hung on a special bulletin board in the cafeteria dedicated to the Reading Incentive 
Program. The students did achieve the goal of the program and in early June, the principal took his 
seat of honor above the dunk tank and was soaked a total of four times. 

The Powerful Pencils bulletin board, located in the library lobby, proves to be a perfect way for us to 
display the talented creative writing of students. Throughout the year, each classroom is assigned a 
time to exhibit some form of writing that students completed in their classrooms. This bulletin 
board has displayed some wonderful writings including trickster tales, narratives, descriptive 
writings and poetry. In addition to this bulletin board, each student has an opportunity to have one 
of their writings published in the school literary magazine called the "Shawsheen Scene." This 
publication goes out three times yearly, giving each student a chance to have one of their works 
appear in the magazine. Three of our staff members coordinate this initiative. 



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Staff members continue to become more versed with integrating technology in the classroom. 
Through the use of the smart board, students are able to interact with programs that enhance lesson 
goals. The CPS system used by a couple of teachers has proven helpful in collecting assessment data 
as teachers have developed testing instruments to evaluate student understanding of skills and 
concepts being taught in the classroom. PowerPoint presentations have greatly added to lessons 
designed by teachers. It is our goal to continue to offer more professional development opportunities 
to staff to help increase the integration of technology in daily instruction. 

After conducting an analysis of the MCAS in both reading and math, the staff determined that 
students would benefit from additional learning experiences in test-taking strategies. To this end, 
the Shawsheen Elementary School offered an after-school assistance program to third grade 
students. This course ran for eight weeks, one day per week, one hour per session. A majority of the 
third grade students opted to participate in this program. The program was coordinated by one of 
our reading specialists and instructed by ten of our teaching staff. The lessons focused on learning 
particular test-taking skills while using reading comprehension content. It was amazing how 
committed the students were in their participation. By conducting a survey at the beginning and 
end of this program, we were able to collect data that clearly suggested that students felt more 
confident in taking tests, given the strategies that they had learned. 

In the spirit of "going green," the school community has become more reliant on posting 
communication on the school's web page. Most school communications such as any school-related 
announcements, newsletters, special activities or programs are posted on the web page. It is our 
hope to keep the public current with all school happenings by placing these announcements on our 
web page. Also, in this vein, we continue to keep the school community informed of school activities, 
including early release days and special events, by sending phone messages via the Connect-Ed 
communication system. This vehicle allows us to reach the entire school community with important 
school information within a matter of minutes. It has also proven very effective in announcing any 
necessary school cancellations or delayed openings. 

In honor of the presidential election, the Shawsheen School conducted a mock election. This activity 
was facilitated by the assistant principal and the student council. All of our students were given a 
chance to vote for the president/vice president of their choice. After several weeks of learning about 
the voting process, the students cast their votes in booths set up in the conference room. The votes 
were tallied by the end of the day and the winners were announced to students. The students had a 
first hand experience of the voting process as a result of their participation in this activity. 

Parent involvement remains high at the school. Parents show their support in a variety of ways: the 
Parent Advisory Council (PAC), the School Advisory Council (SAC), volunteering in the library, 
classrooms and cafeteria, reading in classrooms and sharing careers with students. We are fortunate 
to have parents who are so supportive and help to enrich the educational experience for their 
children. We want to thank the PAC for the beautiful new school sign! 

Congratulations to the members of the third grade team who were awarded the Summer Teacher 
Fund Grant generously offered by the Wilmington Educational Foundation (WEF). As a result, the 
teachers toured Massachusetts during the summer and collected information to enrich the third 
grade unit of study on Massachusetts. From all of the information gathered and photographs taken, 
the teachers created a PowerPoint presentation allowing the audience to take a virtual tour of our 
great state. 

As always, the Shawsheen Elementary School continues to strive to provide excellent learning 
opportunities and experiences for the students. We remain committed to providing the students 
with the education and knowledge to help them form the necessary foundation to become 
accomplished life-long learners and responsible citizens. We are only able to achieve this goal as a 
result of the dedicated collaboration and contributions of all of the school community members 
including students, parents, involved citizens and the school staff. 



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WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 



This year the Woburn Street School has a total student enrollment of 485 in grades one, two and three. 
There are eight first grade classrooms, seven second grade classrooms, eight third grade classrooms, and 
one 502.4 Special Education Substantially Separate Classroom. New staff members this year include 
Ms. Renee Kelly, who was hired to teach third grade when Mrs. Nan Murphy accepted a new position as 
assistant principal at a school in Lowell. In addition, Ms. Kerin Ritchie and Mrs. Martha Bransfield are 
currently working as educational assistants in our 502.4 classroom. Ms. Kimberly Whelan, who replaced 
Mrs. Marilyn Jervis following her retirement last January, was hired as a permanent first grade teacher 
and Ms. Marianne Puddister was hired to replace Mrs. Sarah Shaffer, another first grade teacher who 
relocated to Vermont in June. In addition, Ms. Carroll Conquest has been hired as our art teacher, 
replacing Ms. Sara Sussman who transferred to the Middle School. We have also been fortunate to add 
Mrs. Justine Marquard to our office staff. Mrs. Marquard has been hired to work two hours each day to 
assist our secretary. Mrs. Palermo. Later this year Mr. Arsenault, long-time principal at the Woburn 
Street School, will be retiring. The process is in place for hiring a new principal for the school and 
should begin in Januarj'. 

Technology continues to be an area of major 
emphasis and has been identified as one of 
the district's goals for this year. All of the 
computers and monitors in our computer lab 
were replaced, resulting in a more efficient 
and comfortable computer lab. The school 
year began with a presentation for all 
Wilmington teachers in September by Dr. 
Alan November, well-known authority on 
the use of technology in schools. This focus 
was continued with a day-long series of 
technology workshops for all Wilmington 
staff later in the fall. Teachers are 
currently working to implement what they 
learned during these sessions. Students in 
grades one and two continue to work in the 
Success Maker Program in the computer lab 
twice each week, using both the math and 
reading components of that program, whUe third graders are using the web-based Study Island program 
both at school and at home. This program is another way to help third graders prepare for MCAS 
testing in the spring. Third grade students also continue to develop keyboarding skills using a program 
entitled Bernie's Typing Travels. We continue to use Alpha Smart keyboards for student writing, 
especially for some of our special needs students, and individual teachers have created their own web 
pages. As a staff and school community we continue to seek additional ways to regularly upgrade the 
technological services, equipment and programs at the Woburn Street School. In our effort to "go green" 
we are communicating electronically with staff and parents as much as possible and several documents 
that were previously sent home as hard copies are now available on the web instead. 




Ms. Whelan's first grade class during computer lab 
technology instruction at the Woburn Street School. 



This is the second year we have been using the new standards based progress reports. The new 
reporting system was designed to better coordinate with our instruction and the standards of the 
Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. The new progress reports are based on specific academic 
standards set by the state and student benchmark assessment results are provided to parents in each 
area. This year we are working to make this new system all electronic so that all recording can be done 
on the computer rather than being hand written. This includes specialists as well as classroom teachers. 
The intermediate schools are currently working to create a new progress report for Grades 4 and 5 that 
will coordinate with the one we are using in Grades 1, 2 and 3. This will complete the updating of our 
reporting system at the elementary level. 



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Once again we are offering an after school program to assist third grade students with reading. This 
program is coordinated by Mrs. Donahue and Ms. Jablonsky and begins in January immediately 
following the holiday vacation. This is part of a research project that continues to examine data to 
set measurable goals for improving student performance. In addition, Mrs. King, our assistant 
principal, wrote and received a grant from the Wilmington Educational Foundation for an after 
school book club. This is also set to begin in January and will provide opportunities for children in 
Grades 1, 2 and 3 to read and discuss books at their own reading level. 

The Woburn Street School has been fortunate to receive several other grants this year. We have 
received a grant from Exxon/Mobil for $500 which will be used to purchase materials. We received a 
grant, submitted by Mrs. Traci Jansen, for $700 from Target to pay for our third grade field trip to 
the Middlesex Canal Museum. We also received a grant from the Reading Municipal Light 
Department as a result of our parents completing an on-hne survey regarding the energy efficiency 
of their homes. This grant allowed us to purchase a new energy saving refrigerator and freezer for 
the school to replace the outdated appliances in the teachers' lounge. 

The Reading Incentive Program continues this year to encourage children to read at home. Our 
theme is Vote for Books and the children have been busy reading each day to complete the program's 
requirements. In March we will be hosting our annual visiting author as part of this program. This 
year we are pleased to have Judith Jango-Cohen, a local author who lives in Burlington, as our guest 
author. Ms. Jango-Cohen has written many non-fiction books for children, including Ben Franklin's 
Big Shock, Real Life Sea Monsters, Chinese New Year, The Respiratory System and Penguins. Ms. 
Jango-Cohan will be with us for a full day and a half in March, presenting individual programs to 
each grade level. Children at the Woburn Street School who complete the Reading Incentive 
Program will receive a book written and autographed by our visiting author. To promote this 
program, all of the classroom libraries have been updated with an exciting collection of titles on 
grade level, below grade level and above grade level. 

Safety is always a high priority at the Woburn Street School and in the district. It is our goal to 
ensure the continuous improvement of our safety practices. The safety committee meets regularly to 
discuss ways to implement new procedures to address our changing needs and improve established 
practices. Our office monitor allows us to identify people approaching the front entrance and clear 
them before allowing them to enter the building. All other doors remain locked during the school 
day. Fire drills are conducted monthly, other emergency drills have been developed and practiced 
and staff members continue to discuss procedures for possible situations that would require a 
predetermined plan. At the end of this school year we will be conducting our first drill for an off-site 
evacuation. It is an ongoing goal of the Woburn Street School and the Wilmington Public Schools to 
anticipate any possible emergency situation and to develop a plan to ensure the safety of all students 
and school personnel. In addition, the Wilmington Public Schools has implemented the Connect Ed 
program. This program allows us to contact every parent and staff member in a matter of seconds to 
inform them of a snow day, an early release, a delayed opening or any emergency situation. 

The Woburn Street School is fortunate to have a long and cooperative association with the Northside 
PAC. We are extremely appreciative for its generous support of our school and its programs. The 
PAC sponsors a variety of fundraising activities to generate money for programs and materials that 
benefit the school and enhance the curriculum. The PAC regularly provides enrichment programs 
for our students, as well as providing a variety of materials each year. The Woburn Street School is 
extremely grateful for the hard work and support of the PAC. It is the spirit of cooperation between 
all stakeholders that works to make the Woburn Street School productive and enriching. Working 
together we strive to create and maintain a positive school climate and an environment for learning 
and growth. 

BOUTWELL EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is home to an Integrated Pre-school Classroom, a 
Substantially Separate Pre-school Classroom, six Kindergarten Classrooms and the Bridge Program. 
In addition, BoutweU houses an Extended Day Kindergarten Program (CARES). 



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The Wilmington Public Schools is in its second year of full day kindergarten at both Early Childhood 
sites. The Program is five hours and fifteen minutes in duration. The children have a lunch period 
and recess each day. The Boutwell Early Childhood Center is able to offer a multi-faceted learning 
experience to the students, which includes participation in physical education, music, art, library 
and computer lab. Special Education Services are available for those students who qualify and need 
assistance in the areas of Speech and Language, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy and 
Resource Learning services. This year, a Reading Specialist was added to the staff at the Boutwell 
Early Childhood Center. The Reading Specialist focuses on reading support and enrichment to the 
kindergarten students. 

The Pre-school Program continues to be a half-day program: Monday-Thursday. Both the Pre-school 
and Kindergarten Curriculums are aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Student 
progress reports are submitted to parents in January and June and reflect the Frameworks as well 
as curriculum initiatives. The Houghton Mifflin Reading Language Arts Program and Trailblazer 
Math Program are firmly established in the Kindergarten Curriculum. Our Kindergarten classes 
also maintain book buddies with West Intermediate School students. The Harcourt/Brace Science 
Program continues to be an integral part of the Kindergarten Curriculum. Its focus is on inquiry 
and exploration of the natural and physical world. The Integrated Pre-school Program has adopted 
the Pre-K component of the Houghton Mifflin Reading Language Arts Series. It introduces pre- 
school students to Alpha Friends, the cornerstone of the Reading Program. Literacy and Math 
Nights are offered to parents each year. These continue to be an effective means by which parents 
and private schools can receive an overview of literacy and math components as well as helpful ideas 
and strategies. Both enrich and strengthen the home school connection. 

The Boutwell Parent Advisory Council (PAC) has been a strong and involved presence at the 
Boutwell Early Childhood Center this year. Members of the PAC work closely with staff and 
administration. The enrichment programs funded by PAC, which included "Reach for the Stars", 
"Ben Franklin" and visiting authors, have greatly enhanced curriculum. PAC has brought families 
together with such events as, Movie Nights, Family Fun Night and the Ice Cream Social. Their 
contributions to the students and families have been instrumental in developing a sense of 
community at Boutwell. 

Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is another facet of parent involvement. Along with parents, 
teachers and administrators from both the Boutwell Early Childhood Center and Wildwood Early 
Childhood Center, this council develops a School Improvement Plan that is based around safety, 
security, curriculum and bviilding initiatives. 

Two performances are held during the school year under the direction of our Music Specialist, Pre- 
school and Kindergarten staff. In December, a winter concert was presented to parents and friends. 
This year's theme was "Our Favorite Time of Year". In April, parents were treated to a program that 
celebrated community. It is the culmination of a month long study of the Town of Wilmington. 
Activities that the children participated in included visits by the Town Manager, Fire Chief and 
Postmaster. Our Pre-school hosts a "Grandparents Tea" each spring. It is yet another highlight of 
the school year! 

The Boutwell Early Childhood Center continues to provide a positive and productive learning 
environment for its students, many of whom are experiencing public school for the first time. Our 
staff strives to create a balance between each child's social emotional development while at the same 
time cognizant of curriculum and instruction. With the support and involvement of our parents, we 
endeavor to make each child's school experience an enriching one that will lay the foundation for the 
years to come. 



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WILDWOOD EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER 



The Wildwood Early Childhood Center, located at 182 Wildwood Street, currently has an enrollment 
of 189 Kindergarten and Pre-school students. In September of 2008 the Wildwood Early Childhood 
Center embarked on its second year of full day kindergarten after making a successful transition 
from half day kindergarten in 2007. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center is currently comprised of 
seven full day kindergarten classrooms as well as a special needs kindergarten classroom. The five 
hour and fifteen minute kindergarten day allows our students to learn experientially and at a pace 
that is conducive to more in depth exploration of curriculum. The Wildwood Early Childhood Center 
also offers two pre-school programs. The integrated Pre-school program is presently a half-day 
program with two sessions that run four days a week for two and a half hours a day and a full day 
special needs pre-school that runs five hours and fifteen minutes. Our Pre-school programs help 
build a foundation of skills and early development for our students. In addition, the Wildwood Early 
Childhood Center houses the Wilmington Public Schools Special Education Department. 

Our kindergarten students receive weekly art, music, volunteer run library time, which includes Pre- 
school and computer lab time run by volunteers as well. The computer lab time was increased at the 
onset of this school year to allow our students more time to interact directly with technology to help 
enhance our kindergarten curriculum. Physical Education classes are offered twice weekly. 
Lunches are served to all of our full day students on a daily basis. Special Education support 
services, such as Speech/Language Therapy, Resource/Learning Support, Occupational and Physical 
Therapy are available for students needing such assistance. 

The Wildwood Early Childhood Center prides itself on being a student-centered educational facility, 
emphasizing individual student development, strong student-centered curriculum, family 
involvement and positive school climate. Central to our kindergarten curriculum are the Houghton 
Mifflin English Language Arts Program, which is also utilized in the Pre-school, and the Trail 
Blazers math program. Both programs lay the foundation for student success and both align with 
the Massachusetts State Frameworks. In kindergarten, the Harcourt Science Program was adopted 
last year. Much of our Curriculum Improvement Time went into aligning the science curriculum 
with our existing reading and math programs as well as fine tuning how we teach science to early 
childhood students. With the addition of full day kindergarten, our students now have more time to 
explore hfe, physical and earth science through a hands-on science program. Staff continues to work 
tirelessly keeping our curriculum current and in accordance with the Massachusetts State 
Frameworks, in an effort to provide our students with academic, critical thinking and social skills 
that will last them a lifetime. Classroom and center activities focus on age-appropriate literacy 
skills, phonemic awareness, mathematics, written language, science, social studies and social skill 
development. Social and emotional development is an equally important facet of our curriculum in 
the Pre-school and Kindergarten programs. Play and positive peer interactions are woven into every 
child's day. 

Our School Advisory Council (SAC) is a combined committee of administrators, teachers and parents 
from the Boutwell and Wildwood Early ChUdhood Centers, who meet on a monthly basis to develop a 
School Improvement Plan for the Early Childhood Centers. The School Improvement Plan is a 
compilation of goals addressing the school's needs around learning results, professional development, 
facilities, community, technology and communication. 

Additionally, our parents put forth great interest and enthusiasm in all of their efforts to support our 
school through an active Wildwood Parent Advisory Council (PAC). The PAC sponsors enrichment 
opportunities for our school that include field trips, materials for classrooms, presentations and 
Family Fun Nights that help bring together the Wildwood Early Childhood Center community. 

In the spring the Wildwood Early Childhood Center participates in a school-wide thematic unit that 
focuses on the Town of Wilmington. Through this Wilmington Unit, students learn about the 
community, landmarks and traditions of their hometown through experiences that encompass all the 
strands of the curriculum. During our unit we also have a mini- town meeting where various town 



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ofTicials come to our school and establish important relationships with our young students. Officer 
Moon, our Safety Officer, is a friendly face to all the children as he presents bus and community 
safety programs and Lt. Hurley and other fire fighters bring important fire safety messages and 
programs. We are thankful to have such community involvement and support for the children at the 
Wildwood Early Childhood Center where our goal is to meet the needs of all our students in order for 
them to succeed and develop a life long love of learning. 

FINE .ARTS DEP.ARTMENT 

The department is pleased to welcome Carroll Conquest to our staff. Carroll is a graduate of Tufts 
University with a Master of Arts in Teaching Art Education. She has also been a Master Lecturer at 
the New England School of Art and Design for the senior level Graphic Design classes. Carroll is 
teaching art at the Woburn Street School. Sara Sussman has replaced Karen Larrabee at the middle 
school. We wish Karen all the best on her retirement. 

Suzette Durso, Art and Photography teacher at the high school was presented with a 2008 WEF 
Technolog\' Mini-grant award. This award allowed Mrs. Durso to purchase a wireless presenter for 
her Power Point presentations. 

Due to a record number of enrollments this year, the graphic design program invited ceramics 
teacher, Meghan Hinman, to teach the Graphic Design II course, while Jennifer Fidler continued 
working with the Graphic Design I students. At both levels, students work with Adobe Creative 
Suite 3 software on a variety of design assignments ranging from single-page formats like business 
cards, illustrations and posters to multi-paged formats Hke CD packaging, magazine spreads and 
calendars. This year, the Graphic Design I students will once again participate in the Fun on the 
Fourth T-shirt Design Competition, as well as work on an array of other projects for community 
groups. This December, students will work on a series of posters for the Wilmington High School 
SADD chapter, promoting awareness for seatbelt safety. In Graphic Design II, students worked with 
Ms. Hinman on poster submissions for the Tiburon International Film Festival. As the year 
progresses, both levels will continue to expand on their design skills and talents while also working 
on community-driven assignments. 

The Digital Video program expanded this year, bringing Animation to the Wilmington High School 
Visual Arts curriculum. Starting in January, the first semester of Animation will begin, introducing 
Wilmington students to a wide range of animation techniques using both video and computer 
technology. 

The following students were awarded recognition at the Scholastic Art Awards competition. 
Advanced Art I: 

Ryan Townsend; Grade 11: Ceramics... Honorable Mention Mixed Media: 
Paula Korng: Grade 12: Paste Paper Book... Honorable Mention 

Graphic Design I: 

Danielle Johnston: Grade 10: Personal Stationery Design.... Silver Key 
Graphic Design II: 

Timburon Film Festival Poster: Christopher Lavin: Grade 12 Silver Key 
Brianne Kelly: Grade 12 Honorable Mention 
Amica DiMambro: Grade 11 Honorable Mention 

Students visited the Museum of Fine Arts through the coordinated efforts of Danielle Ackerman, 
Mrs. Shack's student teacher. Students were given a tour of certain works and asked questions 
about the artwork. Art students also visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Cloisters 
Museum of Medieval Art in May. Both museum experiences widen the students' view of the variety 
of realistic and abstract art and a range of images from the medieval to the modern times. 



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Students in Mr. Roberts' classes have been very busy learning and practicing many new concepts 
and techniques. The sixth grade has been working with shape and texture and recently began 
studying how artists use space to enhance their work. In Grade 7, the students have finished 
working on one, two and three point perspective drawings and have recently begun figure drawing 
and learning the proper proportions to draw the human figure accurately. In Grade 8, students are 
learning about Israeli artist Yaacov Agam and are working on a Kinetic-style 3 panel work of art in 
Agam's style. There is a lot of creativity flowing at Wilmington Middle School and the kids are 
actively involved in creating wonderful works of art. 

The following students exhibited their work in the 2008 Congressional Art Competition for the 6'*' 
Congressional District. The students were: Arnica DiMambro, who was awarded Best of School and 
received a $500 scholarship to the Montserrat Summer Portfolio Program, Ruth Blaisdel, Ryan 
Townsend and Caitlin Martins. 

Graphic Design I students participated in the Heinz Ketchup Creativity Contest where students 
across the nation were asked to redesign the Heinz Ketchup packet. Although there were no 
winners from Wilmington High School, the students made some impressive work. 

PERFORMING ARTS 

The Performing Arts Department has been enjoying a productive and successful year both in and out 
of the classroom. The Wilmington Strings Attached program has been hard at work preparing for 
their big trip to France in April 2009. They will be traveling throughout the French countryside and 
will be visiting many towns and cities including Paris, Nice and the French Riviera. In addition, the 
Strings program has made community service a priority, traveling to the Buzzell Senior Center and 
the Wilmington Care Center to perform hohday music this past December. 

The Wilmington Wildcat Band has been busy as ever, finishing off another successful marching 
season. Their philanthropic spirit carries on this year through their involvement in the donation of 
over 300 cans of food to the Wilmington Food Pantry this past winter. The Wilmington Concert 
Bands and Jazz Bands have also been rehearsing heavily for their winter concerts as well as the 
Jazz Bands' upcoming POPS concert in April. 

The Wilmington High School Drama Club is in full swing rehearsing for their upcoming production 
of "Anything Goes". Rehearsals began in early October and the kids have been working hard at 
memorizing lines and exploring characterization on stage. In addition to the musical, the Drama 
Club is also involved in the MHSDG One Act Festival, sponsored by the Boston Globe. This year we 
will be performing "Tartuffe or The Imposter" by Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere and the play is 
being student-directed by Ms. Gabrielle D'Entremont. The casts and crews of both shows are excited 
about their upcoming performances. Also, the Wilmington Middle School Drama Club has just 
begun rehearsals for their spring musical, "Grease Jr." Our new teacher, Ms. Hasselbacher, has 
been working hard with Mrs. Kelly to direct an excellent show this year and turn-outs for auditions 
were extremely high. 

Finally, the Wilmington High School Concert Choir and Acapella group, "SoundScape," have been 
having a great year so far, just finishing their concert circuit for the winter and now preparing for a 
fresh batch of spring concerts. SoundScape will be traveling to St. John's Prep in Danvers, MA to 
perform with their Acapella group, "Swingtown". Shortly after that, in February, SoundScape heads 
into the studio to record their very first CD! The CD will be sold at concerts to the public and will 
feature a wide variety of SoundScape's music, past and present. 

As always, the Wilmington Performing Arts Department has maintained their commitment to 
excellence in music education as well. This year we are testing a pilot recorder text in the classroom 
that was created by a team of elementary teachers in the Wilmington Public School system. In 
addition, the middle school is continuing to explore new methods and techniques of music education 
through the installation of a brand new keyboard laboratory. 



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PHYSICAL EDITATION & HEALTH 



The Physical Education and Health Department continued to serve all students (K-12). 

The Elementary Physical Education and Health Education Program is a comprehensive curriculum 
which incorporates physical fitness and skill development components as well as specific health 
related topics. The Health Education program emphasizes the importance of exercise, body systems, 
hygiene, proper nutrition, personal health care, sun protection and rest/sleep to feel well. The 
students learn to identify major behaviors that contribute to wellness through self-esteem, 
relationships, responsibility, communication and decision making skills. In fifth grade, we continue 
to offer the DARE Program in cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and Officer Julie 
Brisbois. In addition to the curriculum, the Elementary Physical Education & Health teachers 
presented the Elementary Physical Education & Health Fair at Wilmington High School on 
Thursday, March 13, 2008. 

The students from the North Intermediate, West Intermediate, Shawsheen and Woburn Street 
Schools demonstrated physical education and health activities at different stations. There were 
tables for the families to visit to gather information about the programs in our schools. The 
Wilmington Police and Fire Departments presented to the children their education programs. The 
Wilmington Health Services Department conducted screening for blood pressure, BMI, Type II 
Diabetes and Stroke education. The Wilmington Food Services shared important information on 
healthy snacks for children. The evening was a great success!! 

The Middle School Physical Education & Health Education program is a comprehensive curriculum 
which incorporates health, physical fitness and sport skill development for all students. The 
Physical Education Department is extremely excited about the snow shoeing unit available to 
students during the winter. In addition to the snow shoeing unit, the middle school has a traverse 
climbing wall. The climbing wall enhances skills that build strength, endurance and coordination. 
During the faU the entire middle school, students and staff, participated in team building activity 
day that enhanced positive relationships among their entire school community. At this team 
building day everyone created their individual square to be included in the Wilmington Middle 
School Community Quilts. These quilts are hung in the cafeteria at the Wilmington Middle School. 
In addition to the quilts, the staff and students participated in a book discussion related to their 
summer reading assignment. The day was wonderful and enjoyed by everyone at the Wilmington 
Middle School. 



The Physical Education Curriculum at the high school. Health Dynamics, is a comprehensive 
program dealing with health, fitness and life skills. Students will examine appropriate health topics 
including substance abuse, nutrition, physical fitness, human sexuality, mental health and stress 
management. The curriculum also incorporates effects of the environment, consumer issues, ecology 
and social issues in the program. Related physical activities designed to reinforce health issues will 
be offered to ensure a complete holistic sense of mental, spiritual and physical well-being. 



ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 



The Health Dynamics Department cited several students for Outstanding Achievement in 2008: 
Academic Excellence Awards were presented to the following students; 



Class of 2011 
Class of 2010 
Class of 2009 
Class of 2008 



Christopher DiCecca 
Liam Gately 
Lisa Rooker 
Vinny Papageorgiou 



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Academic Achievement Awards were presented to the following students: 

Jared Hayes 
Alessandra Lyman 
Bryanne Mara 
Anthony Marinella 
Tyler Strem 

Athletic Award Recipients 

Dr. Gerald Fagan Award: "To the most outstanding Wilmington High School Senior 
Athlete:" Ernie Mello and Katie Cole 

Lawrence H. Gushing, Sr. Award: "To the senior demonstrating dedication to athletics at 
Wilmington High School:" Nick Farnsworth and Stephanie Baima 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award: "To the senior athlete demonstrating dedication to 
athletics while attending Wilmington High School:" Leah Potcner, Kayla Hanson and 
Michael Gabral 

Joseph H. Woods, Jr. Memorial Scholarship: "To the senior athlete demonstrating 
courage, discipline and tenacity while attending Wilmington High School:" Tom Barry 
and Alyssa Brown 

Jack Wolfe Memorial Scholarship: "To the male and female athlete who exhibit team 
spirit, leadership and equal dedication to academics as well as athletics:" Michael Pizzotti 
and Kim Giampa 

Dick Scanlon Scholarship: Nick Robarge and Kim Giampa 
The Wildcat Distinguished Service Award: Joe Maiella 
Athletic Department Highlights 

The Boys Basketball team, coached by Jim McGune, had an overall record of 18-2. This was their 
seventh consecutive GAL Large School Ghampionship. They lost in the Division III North Final at 
Tsongas Arena to Watertown High School. Zach Fahey was GAL Player of the Year and a Lowell 
Sun All Star. Matt Bibeau was GAL All Conference and a Lowell Sun All Star. Jim McGune was 
GAL and Lowell Sun Goach of the Year. 

The Girls Basketball team, coached by Jay Keane, had an overall record of 14-6. They lost in the 
second round of the Division III North State Tournament. Amy Fahey was Gape Ann League All 
Conference and Lowell Sun All Star. 

The Boys Ice Hockey team, coached by Stephen Scanlon, had an outstanding year with a Cape Ann 
League record of 15-1-4. They finished first in the Cape Ann League. The team lost in the Division 
II State Final at the TD BankNorth Garden to Sandwich High School 1-0. Michael Gabral was a 
GAL All League Player, Lowell Sun All Star and Boston Herald All Scholastic. Ernie Mello was a 
GAL All League Player and a Lowell Sun All Star. Eric Siegel was a GAL and Lowell Sun All Star. 
Stephen Scanlon was the GAL and Lowell Sun Coach of the Year. 

The Wrestling team was coached by Michael Pimental. The Wrestling team was led by Ken Joyce. 
He was a GAL and Lowell Sun All Star. He is the Division III North Sectional and Division III State 
Champion at 215 pounds. 



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The Hoys Indoor Track team, coached by Bob Cripps, won their first Cape Ann League Large 
Championship and finished with an 8-1 record. Nate Clarkin was a CAL All League and Lowell Sun 
All Star in the Shot Put. <Iini Dinuccio was CAL All League in the 600 meter race. Bob Cripps was 
CAL Coach of the Year. 

The Winter Cheerleading team, coached by Nancy Sullivan, were Cape Ann League and North 
Regional Champions. 

Boys Spring Track, coached by Bob Cripps, had a record of 9-1 and finished second in the CAL Large 
Division. Nick Farnsworth was CAL, Class "C" State and All State Champion in the Javelin. The 
Javelin Relay Team, which consisted of Nick Farnsworth, Tom Barry and Mike Pizzotti were State 
Champions. Mike Condell was a CAL Champion in the 800 meter race and Matt Figuieredo was a 
CAL Champion in the 100 meter sprint. 

The Baseball team, coached by Aldo Caira, won its first CAL Large School Championship with a 
record of 13-7. Carlton Lentini was a CAL All Conference Player and Mike Cabral was a CAL All 
Star. 

The Girls Tennis team had its best year in recent memory as they finished third in the CAL Large 
with a record of 10-7. Coach Kevin Welch was CAL Coach of the Year. 

The Boys and Girls Lacrosse teams were added to our Varsity Sports Program. The Boys team, 
coached by Mike Fay, were 7-9 in their first year and just missed the State Tournament by one 
game. They were led by CAL All Stars Sean Fay, Matt Kincaid, Corey Groves and Timmy Gushing. 

Boys Soccer was coached by Stephen Scanlon and had an overall record of 13-1-4 for the second 
consecutive season. The team finished second in the CAL Large Conference. They lost in the semi- 
finals of the Division II State Tournament 1-0 to Masco in double overtime. Jason Pereira and Jon 
Spurr were CAL All League. 

The Football team had an overall record 9-2. The team finished in second place in the CAL Large 
Conference under first year coach Mike Barry. CAL All League players were Steve Stewart, John 
Moriarty, Dennis Gingras and Mike Manganelli. Mike Barry was named Coach of the Year. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

During the last academic year the Special Education Department received 174 referrals for initial 
Team evaluations and provided special education and related treatment services to 596 eligible 
students. 

During the previous year the Special Education Department built a Life Skills Program at the high 
school level. This program extends the district's capability of providing services from the middle 
school level to the high school level for a particular group of eligible students. This program has an 
extended year component in order to prevent substantial regression. Moreover, the students in this 
program work with EMARC on the development of pre-vocational skills. This program has expanded 
the Wilmington Public Schools' capacity to provide in-district services to students with disabilities. 

In a continuing effort to provide staff training for faculty and related service providers the Special 
Education Department has supported numerous workshops and conferences on topics such as, 
applied behavior analysis, the delivery of inclusionary services, alternative MCAS for students with 
disabilities, sensory processing and sensory integration in the classroom, techniques for children 
with emotional and behavioral problems and autism spectrum disorder. 



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SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE 



Wilmington School Food Service employs sixteen fvill-time and twenty-four part-time staff, in 
addition to the Food Service Secretary and the Administrator of Food Services. All salaries, food, 
supply and equipment purchases, as well as most maintenance costs and office suppUes are paid 
from the Food Service revolving account. Revenues obtained from student lunch participation, 
reimbursement from the Department of Education, catering. Senior Citizen Lunch, Extended Day 
Care and other programs are used solely for the support and improvement of the School Food Service 
Program. 

We comply with the United States Department of Agriculture's food based menu-planning system 
and nutrient standards, providing meals that meet 1/3 of the RDA for calories, as well as required 
levels of other key nutrients, including fat, saturated fat, protein, vitamins A & C, iron, and calcium. 
Lunch prices for the 2008/2009 school year are as follows: $1.75 at the Elementary Schools. The 
Middle School is $2.00 and the High School is $2.00-2.50. A total of 404,429 student meals were 
served last school year (2007-2008), an increase of 11,365 meals. Students may choose from a 
variety of lunch options at all grade levels to encourage participation. A variety of fresh fruits and 
vegetables are available each day, as part of the meal. Average monthly participation was 
approximately 65% district- wide. In addition to reimbursable meals, a la carte items are available to 
students to supplement school lunches and those brought from home. 

Allergy and other health concerns continue to be addressed. All full-time food service staff are 
trained annually in EPI-PEN administration. Cafeteria Managers at each school and the 
Administrator of Food Services work closely with school nurses and parents, providing ingredient 
and nutrient information as necessary. At present there are 36 ServSafe certified sanitarians on 
staff including the Administrator and all staff should be certified by April 2009. 

All staff were trained via video, through the town's insurance company on correctly lifting and slips 
and falls. All staff were trained about customer service via video, the video was titled, "Why should 
we be nice to them, they're just kids". 

Computerized Point-of Sale systems are in place at all schools to improve the efficiency and accuracy 
of reporting and accounting. Participation, especially of students eligible for free and reduced price 
meals, has increased remarkably since this program was introduced and onhne services are now also 
available. Other initiatives completed during the school year include various equipment and storage 
facility improvements and the purchase of a new reach in freezer for the Boutwell School and milk 
coolers for both the Woburn Street School and the Wildwood School. 

From August 2007 through July 2008, the Senior citizen home-delivered and congregate meals 
program at the West Intermediate School served 13,820 lunches. 

CONCLUSION 

On average, over 30 years of service to the Wilmington Pubic Schools came to an end for each of 
these staff members: Peg Fleming, Sue Smith, Jim Tildsley, Karen Larrabee, Judith Nowak, JoAnn 
Philips and Jane Willwerth who walked out the door of their respective schools on June 11 to begin 
their retirement. These staff members have been an integral part of the Wilmington PubUc Schools. 
They have given of themselves to support, nurture and teach our students. We will be forever 
grateful for the time and gifts they lavished on our school community. 

Our sincere thanks to Town Manager Michael Caira and his Senior Management staff for their 
consistent support of the public schools. The School Department is proud of the collaborative efforts 
and bonds that have been formed with the town and we are most appreciative that the town 
continues its longstanding commitment to supporting its schools so that they can function as 
learning communities. 



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I ' 

t 



Shawsheen Valley Regional 
Vocational/Technical School District 

The Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District is pleased to submit its 2008 
Annual Report to the citizens of Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Tewksbury and Wilmington. Located 
on Cook Street in Billerica next to the towns of Burlington and Wilmington, the school celebrated its 
38th anniversary this year, perpetuating the highest quality in vocational technical education to 
area youth and residents. 

The elected representatives of the 10-member Regional School Committee that governs the District 
are: Mark Trifiro, Secretary, and Donald Drouin, Treasurer, from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum and 
Bernard F. Hoar, Chairman, from Billerica; Paul V. Gedick and John P. Miller from Burlington; J. 
Peter Dow^ning and Patricia W. Meuse, Vice Chairman, from Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis and 
Robert G. Peterson, from Wilmington. Charles Lyons has been Superintendent/Director of the 
District since 1987. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical High School (SVTHS) is one of 26 regional vocational technical school 
districts in Massachusetts. One thousand two hundred and seventy-six (1,276) high-school students 
were enrolled in SVTHS's day school programs in October of 2008 and more than 500 adults 
participated in the school's various adult and continuing education courses. 

In June of 2008, SVTHS graduated 295 seniors. Ninety-five percent of SVTHS graduates were 
either employed in their area of expertise or pursuing higher education in the fall of 2008. In 
addition, one percent entered the military forces and four percent were employed in other trade 
areas. 

The SVTHS faculty is an exceptional group of talented academic and vocational technical educators 
who are highly qualified to teach in their respective disciplines and occupational areas. SVTHS 
employs 135 full-time teachers as well as 15 para-professionals. Of those full-time teachers, there 
are 11 department chairs and 15 lead teachers. All SVTHS teachers exhibit the character, health, 
personality and professional competency worthy of serving the needs of District students. 

Executive Summary 

MCAS results for SVTHS were outstanding. Due to the phenomenal dedication of our teachers, 
combined with superior student effort, SVTHS continued to achieve one of the highest MCAS state- 
wide passing scores of ninety-nine percent. The percentage of sophomores scoring in the advanced 
and proficient levels continued to improve since the inception of the MCAS exams. 



Student MCAS Performance for Sophomores at SVTHS 

(Note - Special Education population ranges from 27% to 32% of classes) 





English Language Arts 


Math 




Passing 


Advanced 


Proficient 


Passing 


Advanced 


Proficient 


2004 


94% 


3% 


50% 


91% 


8% 


35% 


2005 


92% 


8% 


53% 


89% 


13% 


44% 


2006 


97% 


4% 


66% 


88% 


21% 


41% 


2007 


97% 


10% 


60% 


95% 


25% 


40% 


2008 


99% 


13% 


68% 


99% 


36% 


40% 



The average daily student attendance rate improved for the fifth year in a row. Impressive student 
attendance displays a passion for learning and commitment to education. Moreover, SVTHS's drop 
out rate was significantly below the state-wide average of 3.8% for other Massachusetts high schools. 



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Average Daily Student Attendance 


Drop-Out Data 


2003-2004 


93.8% 


2002-2003 


1.2% 


2004-2005 


94.5% 


2003-2004 


0.9% 


2005-2006 


95.2% 


2004-2005 


1.5% 


2006-2007 


95.5% 


2005-2006 


0.8% 


2007-2008 


95.6% 


2006-2007 


0.2% 


2008-present 


96.2% 


2007-2008 


1.3% 



The SVTHS Construction Cluster, led by department chair James Sullivan, entered a three-year 
contract with the Greater Lowell Habitat for Humanity. This contract ensures the restoration of a 
circa 1800 Farmhouse and the building of eight green technology affordable homes for the 
community of Bedford by Shawsheen students. 



For the sixth time in the past seven years, the SVTHS athletic program was awarded the highly 
esteemed Markham Award from the Boston Globe in recognition of the most outstanding vocational 
technical high school sports program in the state of Massachusetts. 

A highlight for the 2007-2008 year for SVTHS was the induction of the first members to our Alumni 
Association Hall of Fame. There was a gala induction event held at the Tewksbury Country Club in 
the fall of 2008. 

Academic Programs 

Curriculum Revision: SVTHS redesigned its Biology curriculum to align to the Massachusetts 
Biology Frameworks. The revision creates a two-year course that addresses each of the six standards 
promulgated by the Department of Secondary and Elementary Education (DESE) and pays increased 
attention to laboratory activity. 

Anticipating the advent of the History MCAS test, members of SVTHS's Social Studies Department 
are paralleling the biology curriculum revision. During the 2008-2009 school year, SVTHS will 
explore the feasibility of implementing a two-year History course aligned with the Massachusetts 
Frameworks. 

In addition to these standards-driven revisions, members of the Physical Education/Health faculty 
have recently updated that department's curriculum to maximize the instructional activity 
conducted in SVTHS's state-of-the-art Fitness Center. 

SVTHS also redesigned its History curriculum to align to the Frameworks promulgated by the 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE). The revision creates a two-year 
course that addresses the Frameworks' 74 standards, along with its concepts and skills, paying 
increased attention to primary-source documents. Toward this instructional goal, the Social Studies 
Department has adopted the Holt (2005) Call to Freedom text along with ancillary materials to 
accommodate differentiated instruction. 

In a separate accommodation to a recent DESE mandate, SVTHS is developing an Educational 
Proficiency Plan and a developmentally appropriate grade 12 mathematics course for any senior who 
has not achieved proficiency on the MCAS mathematics test. 

MCAS Performance: In the spring 99 percent of SVTHS's tenth graders passed both the English 
Language Arts (310 of 314) and Mathematics (309 of 312) MCAS tests. Eighty-two percent (256 of 
314) of SVTHS's sophomores scored within the proficient or advanced range on the English 
Language Arts test and a noteworthy 36 percent (113 of 312) scored within the advanced range on 
the Mathematic test. These results, which satisfied state-mandated criteria for Annual Yearly 
Progress, represent best-ever performances by SVTHS sophomores. In addition, 98 percent (307 of 
314) of SVTHS's sophomores passed the Biology MCAS test by the spring of 2008. 



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New Staff: In the fall SVTHS hired three academic teachers to fill existing vacancies. Ms. Aimee 
Sueltenfuss joined the Science Department to assist in the implementation of the recently revised 
two-year Biology curriculum: Mr. Brian McCarthy joined the Social Studies Department and Ms. 
Kerry O'Brien, who recently served as a long-term substitute, joined the English Department. In 
addition. Ms. Faith Young joined the staff as a Title-One mathematics aide, replacing the recently 
retired Jo Nagy. 

Summer School: In the summer of 2008, the SVTHS Summer Program returned to Cook Street, 
following its 2007 hiatus to the Locke Middle School, to accommodate the installation of a new roof. 
S\THS enrolled approximately 160 students from ten surrounding school systems in 26 courses 
during the summer of 2008. Individuals seeking summer school information should contact Dr. 
Robert Kanellas. Director of Academic Programs, at 978-671-3640. 

Infrastructure Renovations: The extensive summer renovations to the school's infrastructure 
included, in part, the installation of ceiling-mounted LED projectors and white boards in many 
academic classrooms, the remodeling and air conditioning of two mathematics and two science 
classrooms, the re-carpeting of the school library and the remodeling and air-conditioning of the pool 
locker rooms. 

Support Services 

The SVTHS Support Services Department services the sixth largest population of students with 
special needs in Massachusetts. Our school has the highest graduation rate in the state for schools 
with nearly one hundred Special Education students in each grade. The graduation average for 
students on Individual Educational Plans (lEPs) at SVTHS is 90.2 percent as compared to the state 
average of 61.1 percent. SVTHS's success on the MCAS has continued as a result of a "team" effort 
on the part of Academic, Vocational/Technical and Support Services staff to address the needs of our 
Special Education population. With over 30 percent of our students being diagnosed with special 
needs, our passing rates as a school were over 90 percent on English Language Arts, Mathematics 
and Biology. In addition to their work on MCAS, the Support Services staff has gone through 
extensive training to support and faciUtate the development of lEPs for our special needs population. 
The school has also built and equipped a conference room in order to provide a dedicated space for 
the many meetings that are held as part of this process. 

Building and Grounds 

The SVTHS building underwent major repairs and upgrades. The school roof was replaced, as were 
20 of the 26 heating, ventilation and air condition units. A new Energy Management System was 
purchased and there were major upgrades to the electrical system. A new gym floor was also 
installed. 

The original project costs authorized by member towns for the aforementioned projects were $5.5 
milhon. Actual project costs totaled $4.5 milhon. SVTHS issued General Obligation Bonds of 
$2,340,000, and received $2,160,082 from the Massachusetts School Building Authority to fund the 
project. The General ObUgation Bonds received a low bid of 3.69% payable over nine years. 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District was one of the fi^rst school districts 
in the Commonwealth to be reimbursed by the newly formed Massachusetts School Building 
Authority. 

The district also completed significant renovations to the pool locker room area. Member 
communities for local high school swim teams and the pubhc at large use the pool facility 
extensively. 

Clubs and Organizations 

Student Council: The Ninth Annual Shawsheen Turkey Bowl, the much anticipated flag-football 
game between the junior and senior girls, was once again a successful holiday event, which raised 
approximately $600 and 20 cases of food for the Billerica Food Pantry. In addition, the Student 



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Council, under the direction of faculty advisor Ms. Ellen Mountain, continued its energetic recycling 
program throughout the year. 

Drama Club: During the winter, members of the Drama Club, under the direction of Ms. Angela 
Caira and Mr. Timothy Woodward, staged a Night at the Grammys that featured, in part, 
performances from Cher, Jordan Sparks, Josh Groban, Tim McGraw and the Backstreet Boys. In the 
spring, this versatile troupe of performers staged an equally successful Frankenstein production in 
two acts. 

Newspaper and Literary Magazine: On behalf of The New England Scholastic Press Association, 
Executive Director Helen Smith of Boston University's College of Communication awarded SVTHS's 
Uterary magazine Ramblings its Highest Achievement Journalism Award in Scholastic Editing and 
Publishing. This distinguished regional award recognized the special talents of the SVTHS students 
who supplied the content and designed the layout of the annual publication under the supervision of 
Mrs. Leah Marquis of the English Department and Mr. Doug Michaud of the Technical 
Illustration/Commercial Art shop. 

Oratory Club: Sara Pietila, a 12'h grade Health student from Billerica, placed first at the District 
level in the Voice of Democracy Speech Contest sponsored by VFW Post 2597 of Pinehurst. 

Alumni Club: Throughout the 2006-07 school year, faculty advisor Gail Poulten and her committees 
estabhshed a network of alumni from SVTHS's 35 graduating classes. That network, published in 
the inaugural edition of the Shawsheen Alumni Directory, supported the more recent planning for 
yet another inaugural task, the formation of an Alumni Hall of Fame. By the conclusion of the 2007- 
2008 school year, plans for the Hall of Fame event were near complete. Any SVTHS alumni 
interested in working with Mrs. Poulten should contact her at gpoulten@shawsheen.tec.ma.us or 
978-671-3584. 

The Traveling Rams: For the inaugural event of the newly formed Rams International Travel club, 
dubbed The Traveling Rams, faculty advisor Ms. ICristin Sciacca ushered 40 students and 5 
chaperones along educational tours of Venice, Florence and Rome and, upon the group's return, 
enthusiastically began planning a return trip to Greece and Italy in the spring of 2009. 

Parent Advisory Council: Once again, graduation day culminated in a well-attended all-night party 
sponsored and organized by the SVTHS Parent Advisory Council under the direction of its faculty 
advisor, Mr. Ronald Fusco, and its chair and SVTHS alumna, Mrs. Robin Sgrosso. 

Athletics 

More than 450 students participated in interscholastic athletics capturing the Commonwealth 
Athletic Conference Championships in golf, volleyball, boys ice hockey, boys basketball, baseball, 
Softball and boys lacrosse. The Rams also captured state vocational titles in football, girls soccer, 
boys ice hockey, girls basketball and girls swimming. The overall winning percentage of the varsity 
teams, eleven of whom qualified for post-season play, ranked among the highest in school history. 
Dozens of SVTHS athletes were honored with All-Star recognition by either the Commonwealth 
Athletic Conference or the Lowell Sun. In addition, SVTHS's Dean of Students, Mr. Chet Flynn, was 
honored by the Lowell Sun as its volleyball Coach of the Year. 

For an unprecedented sixth time in seven years, SVTHS has earned the Markham Award from The 
Boston Globe for the most outstanding vocational technical high school sports program in 
Massachusetts. The award is a reflection of the commitment and talent of all those associated with 
the SVTHS athletic program. 



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(?ftnm^1' ^itv Services 



Adult Ei'ening School: The Adult Evening School offered a wide variety of vocational/technical 
courses for adults interested in expanding their knowledge and skills. Courses are offered during 
both the fall and spring semesters, with enrollment exceeding five hundred adult learners during the 
past year. Interested residents should contact Carissa Karakaedos, Director of Community Services, 
at 978-671-3607 for information and/or a brochure. 

School of Practical Nursing: The 2007-2008 year graduated 35 Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN). 
Since its inception, a total of 457 students have successfully continued on to rewarding careers as 
Licensed Practical Nurses. This intense ten-month program offers a combination of evening and 
weekend coursework and clinical externship experiences. Preparation for the state LPN exam is also 
included. Residents interested in applying to the LPN program are urged to contact the Director of 
the School of Practical Nursing, Ms. Patricia Noonan, at 978-671-3646. 

Project Explore: Nearly 500 middle school students from the District participated in after school 
career awareness activities during the 2008 winter semester. Students explored a variety of career 
path options. This program is coordinated in conjunction with the middle school guidance 
counselors. For registration materials or general information, please contact Carissa Karakaedos at 
978-671-3607. The program is free of charge. Busing is provided by SVTHS. 

Swim Program: SVTHS offered several high-quality swim programs during the 2007-2008 year in 
its Olympic sized, recently renovated, swimming pool, with its newest addition of water aerobics two 
nights a week. The Shawsheen pool also serves as the home site for Interscholastic High School 
swim teams from the Billerica, Bedford and Burlington public schools. Individuals seeking swim 
program information should contact Ms. Jill Branley, Aquatic Director, at 978-671-3699. 

Billerica House of Correction: The Billerica House of Correction (BHOC) recently hired an Education 
Director to lead its current initiatives beyond the already established Culinary Arts program. 
SVTHS continues to collaborate through the Director of Community Services, Carissa Karakaedos, 
with BHOC to expand its educational goals to inmates. SVTHS looks forward to maintaining its 
relationship with BHOC by providing technical assistance and end-of-course assessment services 
that will validate inmate achievement of the course objectives. 

Middlesex Community College: SVTHS continued its partnership with the Hospitality Management 
Department of Middlesex Community College to deliver four courses at SVTHS as part of the 
requirements for its Culinary Arts Certificate or Associates in Science Degree option. Student 
enrollment is strong and the program receives exemplary student evaluations. Discussions to 
expand technical course offerings are currently being explored by the Middlesex Community College 
Hospitality Dean and SVTHS Director of Community Services, Carissa Karakaedos. 

Non-Traditional by Gender Advisory Committee: The SVTHS Non-traditional by Gender Advisory 
Committee entered its second year to support initiatives for students enrolled in occupational areas 
that are non-traditional by gender. The committee is led by a chair overseeing four SVTHS teachers 
and staff including two vocational teachers, one academic teacher and a support staff involved in the 
Gay/Straight Alliance. The committee planned activities and community events to commence during 
our 8'^ Grade Career Night and Community Open House. 

Computer Services 

Student Information System: The Computer Services staff completed the 2008 Academic School Year 
using "iPASS" (Internet Pupil Administrative Software System) to meet all Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) and district reporting requirements. In May, the 
freshmen entered into their permanent shop placement and the 2008-2009 scheduling process 
started for all students. During the summer, Computer Services helped complete all academic 
students scheduling, ninth grade exploratory scheduling and the customized "welcome back to 
school" letters to parents. In October, Computer Services added the class of 2012 to Parent Access 
Manager. Use of the iPASS Parent Access Manager has increased from 25% in 2004, 53% in 2005, 



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parents this year. The Parent Access Manager allows parents to view up-to-date information on their 
children in the areas of attendance, grades, schedules and discipline information. From October through 
December, Computer Services completed the annual Education Personnel Information Management 
System data collection project for the Department of Education as well as the annual Technology Report. 

Computer Network: During 2008, computer labs for Electronics, Business Technology, Graphic Arts and 
Commercial Art & Design received new computer upgrades, LCD displays and network switches as 
needed. In addition, computer labs in the school received new hard disk images to refresh and update 
the computers with required software. During the spring and fall the four-year computer technology 
replacement plan was reviewed and updated for new technology needs and approved by the SVTHS's 
Technology Committee. During the summer the department purchased and installed a new SAN 
(Storage Area Network) as part of the long-term capacity planning process. 

Applications: The Computer Services staff started working with the Support Services department to 
introduce the new eSped software for tracking Individuahzed Education Plans. The department also 
started working with the Vocational Director to introduce the new VTCTS (V ocational Technical 
Competency Tracking System) to the vocational staff. By the end of 2008, the Computer Services staff 
installed and introduced Office 2007 to the Business Technology Department as well as the clerical and 
administrative staff. 



Guidance 

Admissions: SVTHS implemented a 
new admissions policy including an 
interview component. This change 
provides students with an opportunity 
to participate and impact their 
admissions score. 

College and Career Planning: The new 
Career Planning program engages every 
SVTHS student in the creation of a 
personalized career plan. The program 
is web based and accessible outside of 
school. College, career, financial aid and 
personal goal settings are all part of the 
new program. Almost 60% of the 
graduating class went on to college after 
graduation. 

Scholarships and Awards: Local community organizations and SVTHS affiliates contributed 
approximately $84,000 in scholarships this past year. SVTHS also saw an increase in Abigail and John 
Adams Scholarship award winners from 47 to 66 for this year's graduating seniors. 

Cooperative Education Program: One hundred forty (140) students participated in Cooperative 
Education in 2008. Cooperative Education placement resulted in a number of permanent jobs in their 
field for roughly 40% of the graduates. 

School Council 

An important agency of school governance, the 2007-2008 SVTHS School Council is made up of three 
parents: Co-chair Kenneth Miano of Tewksbury, Jean Perry of Burlington and Joanne Barry of 
Billerica, two community members: Bob Lazott of Billerica and Cosmo Ciccariello of BurHngton, two 
SVTHS faculty members: Robert Roach and Jason Tildsley and co-chaired by Dr. Robert E. 
Cunningham, Assistant Superintendent-Director/Prinicpal. 




Citizenship Award recipient Keighla Dalton (2009) with Dean of 
Students Chet Flynn, her mom, Shawsheen Tech alum 
Nancy Dillon (1990) and Superintendent Charles Lyons. 



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The three primary functions of the school council are to meet with the Superintendent-Director when 
ho presents the school budget, to make additions and revisions to the SVTHS Student Handbook and 
to develop the annual School Improvement Plan. 

Technical Programs 

Skills USA- Skills USA Massachusetts is a national organization preparing America's high 
performance workers in programs, including occupational and leadership skills. Earning several 
gold medals at the State level, 10 SVTHS students, competing in five contests, placed in the top ten 
for nine of their participants at the National Competition in Kansas City. 

National Accreditation: Of SVTHS's 19 vocational programs, twelve are nationally accredited. 
These programs include in part Automotive Technology, Automotive Collision, Machine Technology, 
Metal Fabrication, Culinary, Graphic Communication, Drafting, Diesel Technology, HVAC and 
Health Technologj'. 

Transportation Cluster 

Automotive: Recently the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) institute recognized Mr. Benjamin 
Hurley and Mr. Richard Lavoie for being Master Tech Certified for over 25 years of service. 

The auto tech program, through the capital budget process, will be acquiring a new, technologically 
advanced Hunter TCX 500 Tire Machine and a Geneses Computer Scanner Analyzer. 

Auto Body: Newly hired instructor, Mr. Eric Silverio, brings a wealth of talent as he has developed 
new projects that incorporate custom painting into the curriculum. Through lead teacher Mr. David 
Lelievre's professional development, the I-CAR curriculum is now being implemented in all grade 
levels. 

To maintain a safe environment, two portable ventilators were purchased from the safety budget. A 
Sata fresh air supply paint mask has also been added. In addition, the shop updated its appearance 
through a new sink, painted walls and new floor. 

In continuing to build community relations, the auto body students worked on two Tewksbury Police 
vehicles. 

Diesel: With the closing of Iverson Ford, a local dealership, their entire Ford Repair Manual Library 
was donated to SVTHS's Diesel program, providing an immense resource. Through the capital 
budget process via a recommendation from the Diesel Advisory committee, the program will acquire 
a new MODUS electronic scan tool unit with CAN capabilities. Restoring a plow and truck for the 
Boy Scouts of America and a tractor for the Shriner's Burn Center were two community service jobs 
completed by SVTHS Diesel students. 

Service Cluster 

Health Services & Technology: The Health Services and Technology Program's curriculum continues 
to be enhanced, adding new activities to expose students to careers in Biotechnology, Fingerprinting 
and Hemoglobin Electrophoresis. These activities were added after SVTHS was awarded the Bio- 
Teach Grant to introduce students to the field of biotechnology. The grant's Boston University City 
Lab will be visiting SVTHS in January 2009, where health technology and science classes will 
participate in various biotechnology labs. 

Through a generous donation, the Health Technology Department acquired six hospital beds from 
New England Rehabilitation of Woburn. The program also purchased six mannequins, along with an 
Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) trainer, through grant funding. 

The Health Technology program continues to sponsor community blood drives and maintains 
outstanding success this year drawing over 50 pints of blood. 



-108- 



Culinary: After 30 years of service in the Bakery, Mr. Gary Levin retired. Mr. Gerry Perriello now 
instructs the Bakery program, while Mrs. Margaret Costello teaches in the kitchen area. Mr. Brian 
Considine, a former student of SVTHS, was hired as the new Dining Room supervisor. 

Through the capital budget process and the recommendations of the craft advisory board, the 
Cuhnary program purchased a walk-in refrigerator freezer combination for the kitchen area, along 
with a new steam table and dining room china. 

Community service activities included a retreat in Vermont for a weekend to New England Cuhnary 
Institute, participation in a Boston food show and reception and selhng BiUerica Food Pantry pies for 
people in need. In addition, Mrs. Costello volunteered a few weeks this summer to help build homes 
in New Orleans for Hurricane Katrina victims. 

Cosmetology: The Cosmetology program once again graduated all its 2008 seniors with licensure 
from the Massachusetts State Board of Cosmetology exam. 

The students visited the BurUngton Towers Senior Center and Life Care Nursing Home, giving 
manicures and hairstyles to the senior citizens for the holidays. Students also visited the Bedford 
and BiUerica Senior Centers giving the elderly a day of beauty. 

Through the capital budget process, the Cosmetology program received funding for renovations, 
including freshly painted walls, a new floor, dispensary, faucet, refaced cabinets with a new 
countertop, reception desk, skin room facial bed, magnifying Hght, utihty table, wax warmer and 
facial steamer. 

Construction Cluster 

In addition to enhancing the current curriculum, the construction cluster entered a three-year 
contract with the Greater Lowell Habitat for Humanity. This agreement will oversee a cul-de-sac of 
green technology homes to be built, along with the restoration of a circa 1800's Farmhouse, all 
located in Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Community service projects encompassed several jobs on a house in Wilmington; a wiring job 
completed by the Electrical program, the HVAC program designed and installed a dual heating and 
coohng fresh air system and the construction of a 30 foot, 2-flu chimney and 40 foot retaining waU by 
masonry. In addition. Masonry continues to construct a handicap-access playground in Burhngton. 
Through the capital budget process. Carpentry will acquire new staging, air compressor system and 
air guns. The Electrical and HVAC departments will acquire a new enclosed work trailer. 

SVTHS's construction cluster continues to maintain its affUiations with local unions. 

Arts and Communication Services Cluster 

Business Technology: The Business Technology program prepares students for industry required 
exams and certifications. Five seniors passed their Microsoft Office Specialist Exam for Word 2003 
in the spring of 2008. 

Business Professionals of America (BPA) is a student organization that prepares a world-class 
workforce through the advancement of leadership, citizenship, academic and technological skiUs. 
Two SVTHS Business students were elected to official positions, state president and vice president of 
the Massachusetts chapter. During the BPA State competition, one of the Business students won 
first place in Reno, Nevada for prepared speech. 

Over the summer, the program acquired all new computers implementing Microsoft Office 2007 
software. 



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Informational Support Serrices & Networking: The Informational Support Services & Networking 
program now offers students the opportunity to attain an international certification: Comptia A+ 
Certification. The program also added an iJava online course sponsored by UMass Amherst where 
students receive credits via UMass Amherst. 

Community services projects included web sites for Billerica Partners for Education www.BPED.org 
and the Billerica Scholarship Organization www.Billericascholarship.org and a visit to Billerica 
Access Television (BATV"). 

Design & Visual Communications: With the expansion of the Design & Visual Communication 
program. SVTHS hired graduate, Mr. Greg Bendel. Program renovations included a new server with 
an up-graded networking system, additional workstations, upgrading the electrical service and 
setting up and loading new computers, printers and a scanner. 

Community service jobs included design/sign work for a local skating arena, Shawsheen Community 
Open House, brochures and posters, completion of alumni design projects, TraveUng Rams Italy 
poster and postcards and Skills USA participation in pin design. 

Graphic Communications: The Graphic Arts program continues to grow its positive community 
relationship via printing work. Some of the work includes letterheads, envelopes, flyers, 
parent/teacher newsletters, yearbooks, directories. Tax Department and Assessor's Office mailings. 
Police, Fire and Public Works Department forms, posters and memo pads. In addition, SVTHS's 
Graphics program received the "Cameron Cup" award for service by the CouncU on Aging. 

Electro/Mechanical Cluster 

Computer Aided Design & Drafting: On December 5, 2008 the Drafting program earned its second 
certification from the American Design Drafting Association, Apprentice Drafter Architectural. 
Currently SVTHS is the only vocational technical high school in Massachusetts to hold certifications 
in both Technical Drafting and Architectural Drafting. With the expansion of the program Mrs. 
Stacy Gerace has been hired as a full-time instructor. 

The Drafting students continued to gain valuable experience by working on community projects such 
as the second floor design of the Wilmington house project, Handicap Maze Design for Burlington (in 
process), drawing support for the Habitat Project and the National Honor Society Candle Display 
weldment (in process). 

A competitive Perkins Grant was awarded to the Drafting program this year to purchase a Z-Corp 3- 
D printer recommended by the Craft Advisory Board. In addition, the capital budget process 
provided an update to the AutoCAD 2009 and Pro/Engineer Wildfire Softwares. Thirty-six chairs 
and six new computers were also purchased. 

Electronics: Mr. John Antonetti was hired this fall, bringing over thirty years of experience to the 
program. In an effort to move forward with 21*' century technological skills, the Electronics program 
started an after school Robotics club. The club will be entering two First Tech Challenge (FTC) 
competitions in February and March 2009. In addition, several senior students designed and built a 
Van DeGraff generator that will be used to demonstrate the principles of static electricity to 
freshmen students. 

Machine Technology: The Machine Technology program entered into a dual-enrollment agreement 
with Central Maine Community College. Eighty-six percent of the senior class participated in the 
agreement and received college credits. Five students also received Engineering Project Certificate 
of Completion from Wentworth Institute of Technology and the Museum of Science. 

Over the summer the machine shop equipment was rebuilt to new condition, which included a 13" 
South Bend Lathe and a cut-off saw. 



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Metal Fabrication and Welding: Students of the Metal Fabrication program participated in the 
Construction Career Day at the Labors Union Hall in Hopkinton. The class also visited the Sheet 
Metal Workers Local 17 in Dorchester and was chosen to host an annual open house for the Boston 
Chapter of American Welding Society. 

Through the capital budget process and recommendations of the Craft Advisory Board, the programs 
have acquired CNC Plasma-Cam Cutting system and 2 Lincoln Flux core Mig Welders. 

Conclusion and Acknowledgement 

The SVTHS Committee, staff and students gratefully appreciate the support that they receive from 
the residents of the 5-member District. The SVTHS family especially acknowledges the continued 
financial support of the local Town Managers, Finance Committees and Town Meetings, which 
collectively ensure and perpetuate the highest quality in vocational/technical training opportunities 
for area youth. 

The District is grateful for the significant contributions provided by SVTHS staff and employees and 
acknowledges the many contributions of the SVTHS staff who retired during 2008. Those retirees 
are: Floyd Newbegin, Autobody; George Caron, Diesel Shop Aide; Josephine Nagy, English 
Department Aide; and Gary Levin, Bakery Instructor. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 




In 2008, the department continued providing a high level of service to the community in the areas of 
planning, conservation, housing, transportation and other community development activities. Staff 
support is provided to the Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Housing Partnership, Open 
Space and Recreation Plan Committee and the Zoning Board of Appeals for Comprehensive Permits. 
The Planning Board is responsible for administration of the Subdivision Control Act and Site Plan 
Review, issuance of Special Permits for Conservation Subdivisions, Chapter 81G road improvement 
projects, Over-55 housing, multi-family units in the Central Business District and lots having less 
than 10,000 square feet of land; recommendations on zoning amendments, cases before the Board of 
Appeals and specific planning studies. The Conservation Commission is responsible for wetlands 
protection in accordance with the State Wetlands Protection Act. The Commission is also 
responsible for management of the Town's Open Space Land and for acquiring additional land for 
passive recreation. The Housing Partnership continued efforts to provide affordable housing for 
Wilmington residents through local initiatives and partnerships with private developers. The 
activities of each board are described in more detail below. 

Departmental goals are: 

1. To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board in its review of subdivision and site 
plans. 

2. To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in administration and 
enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act, its associated regulations and 
Conservation Commission policies. 

3. To provide coordinated review of development plans through the Community Development 
Technical Review team. 

4. To provide assistance and information to residents. 

5. To undertake implementation of priority recommendations of the Master Plan. 

6. To implement recommendations of the Planned Production Plan for affordable housing. 

7. To implement stormwater management recommendations of the Comprehensive Water 
Resources Management Plan. 

8. To undertake other strategic planning efforts, as applicable. 



-Ill- 



9. To revise the zoning by-laws and zoning map to enhance the character of the town, consistent 
with the Master Plan. 

10. To update the Subdivision Rules and Regulations to improve the development review process 
and the quality of development, consistent with the Master Plan. 

11. To implement recommendations of the Open Space and Recreation Plan. 

12. To implement suggested improvements to the Town Forest based on the Town Forest Plan. 

13. To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 

14. To promote environmental awareness and education. 

15. To promote environmental stewardship. 

16. To review 40B projects and provide input to the Board of Appeals. 

17. To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership, including initiation and 
implementation of affordable housing efforts, monitoring of on-going developments and 
review of projects sponsored by developers. 

18. To develop and implement community development programs, including the Community 
Development Block Grant Program. 

19. To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various state and regional 
forums. 

Carole Hamilton is the Director of Planning and Conservation. She staffs the Planning Board and 
Housing Partnership. She chairs the Community Development Technical Review Team and the 
Property Review Board, coordinating the review of development projects and the disposition of town- 
owned land. She serves as the point person for review of 40B affordable housing projects and 
provides input to the Board of Appeals. The Director serves as the representative to the 
Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and 
the North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC), acting as the liaison between the town and the state 
on transportation and planning issues. 

Winifred McGowan serves as the Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation and provides 
technical assistance to the Conservation Commission and the department on wetland and 
environmental issues. Michael C. Vivaldi serves as Assistant Planner. Senior Clerks Cheryl 
Licciardi and Joann Roberto provide administrative support. 

Special Projects: 

Town Forest Improvement Project 

The Town Forest Improvement Plan is intended to expand the accessibility and enjoyment of the 
Town Forest as a passive recreational resource, while providing for the proper stewardship of the 
Town Forest as a vibrant, diverse, living ecosystem. The Plan details the natural resources within 
the forest and presents a preHminary plan for developing the public trail system and improved 
parking. 

Open Space and Recreation Plan Update 

The Town's Open Space and Recreation Plan is mandated to be updated every five years and the 
Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee was re-established in 2006 for that purpose. During the 
winter, public meetings will be held for review of the updated plan. A final document is expected to 
be ready for submission in early summer. Judy Waterhouse is the Chairman Members are Betty 
Bigwood, C. Michael Burns, Francis DellapeUe, Michael Fay, Richard Grinder, Jeffrey HuU, Kenneth 
Lifton, Mark Nasiff, Beverly Shea and Martha Stevenson. William Hooper, Jr. resigned during the 
year. Louis Cimaglia serves as Liaison for the Board of Selectmen. Winifred McGowan, Assistant 
Director of Planning and Conservation, provides staff support. 



-112- 



Planning Board 

The responsibilities of the Planning Board include review of subdivision and "Approval Not 
Required" plans; review of commercial and industrial site plans; issuance of special permits for 
Conservation Subdivisions, multi-family units in the Central Business District, Over-55 housing, lots 
having less than 10,000 square feet and Chapter 81G roadway improvements; recommendations to 
the Board of Appeals on variances and special permits; strategic and comprehensive planning; 
zoning amendments and implementation of the Master Plan. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five-year terms. Planning 
Board members are Michael Sorrentino (Chairman), Ann Yurek (Clerk), Randi Holland, Brian 
Corrigan and James Banda, Jr. 

Subdivision Control 

Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by M.G.L. Chapter 41, 
Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed one conventional subdivision with three lots. No conservation 
subdivisions were reviewed. 



Conventional Subdivision 
Rhode Island Road 



# Lots 



Action 
Approved with conditions 



Twelve (12) "Approval Not Required" (ANR) plans were submitted. The Planning Board determined 
that all twelve (12) plans did not require approval under the Subdivision Control Law and were 
endorsed. While the majority of the plans were lot line readjustments that did not create any new 
building lots, one plan created six new lots and another combined two lots, creating one lot. 




Sovereign Bank under construction on Main Street. 



Site Plan Review 

Eighteen (18) new site plan review 
applications for commercial and 
industrial projects were submitted. 
The Planning Board approved 
thirteen (13) projects with conditions, 
one of which was carried over from 
2007; two were withdrawn, one was 
denied for insufficient information and 
four others are pending. The sites are 
generally spread around town. A 
proposal originally submitted for 
Dunkin Donuts in North Wilmington 
was withdrawn from a site adjacent to 
the train stop and moved across the 

street to the Channel Building site. A mixed-use building on Church Street across from the Post 
Office was approved for retail and apartment use. Many proposals were for minor additions to 
existing structures. One industrial building on BaUardvale Street, which proposed a minor 
modification to its building, required some substantial re-grading to the parking lot. The Planning 
Board and Conservation Commission worked with the developer to include several low impact 
development techniques in the redesign of the parking area. Sheet run-off from the parking area 
into a large detention pond created when Route 93 was constructed was either eUminated and 
infiltrated on site or cleaned prior to discharge. The detention pond has become home to several 
species including families of mallard ducks. Porous pavers were used in several areas of the parking 
lot to allow additional water to infiltrate directly into the ground. Pending appHcations include a 
site originally proposed for a Target store and redevelopment of the neighborhood businesses at the 
corner of Hopkins Street and Shawsheen Avenue. 



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Zsmiog 



In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A. the Planning Board held required statutory public hearings 
on proposed amendments to the Zoning By-law and Map and submitted formal reports and 
recommendations to Town Meeting voters. Those recommendations are included in this Annual 
Report under "Town Meeting." 

Conservation Commission 

The Wilmington Conservation Commission is charged with upholding the interests of the 
Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act. The Commission received 84 filings for activities under the 
jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection (M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40 and its 
regulations at 310 CMR 10.00) in 2006. 

Wilmington has an abundance of these wetland resource areas, including banks, bordering vegetated 
wetlands (swamps, marshes, etc.), land under water bodies and riverfront areas. Activities reviewed 
by the Commission can include tree removal and landscaping and construction of houses, driveways, 
additions, septic systems and subdivision roadways/utilities/drainage systems within 100 feet of the 
above resource areas or 200 feet of a perennial stream. Work within bordering land subject to 
flooding (floodplain) is also subject to the jurisdiction of the Conservation Commission. Each filing 
involves one or, in some cases, multiple public hearings before the Commission. The Commission 
seeks to work through the permitting process with the applicant to provide protection of the public 
and private water supply as well as groundwater supply, provide flood control, prevent storm 
damage and pollution and protect wildlife habitats. Residents are encouraged to attend and provide 
comment relative to work near wetland resource areas. The hearings are generally held on the first 
and third Wednesday of each month. The agenda for hearings can be accessed at 
www, town. Wilmington. ma. us/old/conserve. htm . 

When the Wilmington Conservation Commission was originally formed in 1964, its purpose was to 
inventory, promote, develop and conserve the town's natural resources. Today, the primary 
responsibility of the Conservation Commission is the administration and enforcement of the 
Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act, (310 CMR) leaving Httle time to actually acquire and 
manage open space. With funding from the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and 
Recreation, the Conservation Commission oversees a management plan for the Town Forest. 
Implementing effective forest management strategies are the Commission's goals. The significant 
size of the parcel (154 acres) and the fact that most of it is a scenic forested upland make it a very 
promising site for passive recreational activities such as hiking, horseback riding, picnicking, 
bicycling, cross-country skiing, birding and photography. With the access road and parking area, the 
forest is accessible to residents. 

During the summer, the Commission utilized the services of a college intern to inventory parcels of 
land under the care and custody of the Commission establishing the current condition of the parcels; 
listing formal and informal trails as well as natural features of interest; and noting observations of 
intrusion such as dumping. Additionally, a stewardship program is being developed to ask for 
volunteers interested in overseeing these parcels. Additional information on this program will be 
curculated during the spring and summer of 2009. 

Conservation Commissioners are appointed to three-year terms by the Town Manager. Citizens 
serving on the Commission in 2008 were: Chairman Beverly Shea, Vice Chairman Vincent Licciardi, 
Frank Ingram, Mario Marchese, Donald Pearson, Thomas Siracusa and Judy Waterhouse. Any 
questions about wetlands, laws and regulations, or filing procedures should be directed to Winifred 
McGowan, Assistant Director of Planning & Conservation. 



-114- 



Statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected 


$13,310.00 


Notices of Intent Filed 


49 


Requests for Determinations of Applicability 


33 


Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation Issued/Pending 


2/0 


Public Hearings/Meetings Held (including continuances) 


151 


Extension Permits Issued/Denied 


20/0 


Enforcement Orders Issued 


11 


Violation Notices Issued 


34 


Certificates of Compliance Issued/Denied 


29/4 


Decisions AppealedAVithdrawn 


3/0 


Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Pending 


49/3/1 


Emergency Certifications Issued 


8 


Request for Insignificant Change Approved/Denied 


11/1 


Negative Determination/Pending 


32/0 


Positive DeterminationAV ithdrawn/Pending 





Request for Amendments/IssuedAVithdrawn/Pending 


0/0/0/0 


Acres of Land Acquired 


4.05 



Housieg Partnership 

The Housing Partnership continued to be active considering opportunities to provide affordable 
housing for Wilmington residents. 

As affordable housing efforts have resulted in achieving 9.97% affordabiUty, the Partnership, this 
year, has been involved in developing guidelines for developers interested in continuing to provide 
affordable housing. The guidelines set out criteria for affordable housing developments that reflect 
goals of the Master Plan; small scale development that preserves community character, adjacency to 
transportation nodes, single family homes as opposed to mvdti-family development. It is the 
Partnership's intent that these gmdeUnes assist developers by identifying the types, sizes and 
attributes of affordable housing development most compatible to existing neighborhoods throughout 
the community, thereby allowing the developer to have the highest expectation of a positive response 
from the Boards and Commissions offering recommendations to the Board of Selectmen and then the 
Board of Appeals on affordable housing proposals. 

Housing Partnership members are Chairman Raymond Forest, Gregory Erickson, John Goggin, 
Cynthia McCue and Lester White. Raymond Lepore serves as Liaison for the Board of Selectmen. 
The Partnership meets the second Wednesday of the month and welcomes the attendance of 
interested residents. Michael Vivaldi, Assistant Planner, serves as staff support to the Partnership, 

The Director of Planning & Conservation is the point person for review of 40B proposals and serves 
as staff support on these appUcations to the Board of Appeals. 




Created in 1963, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) promotes inter-local cooperation 
and advocates for smart growth by working closely with cities and towns, state and federal agencies, 
non-profit institutions and community-based organizations in the 101 cities and towns of 
Metropolitan Boston. MAPC strives to provide leadership on emerging issues of regional significance 
by conducting research, building coalitions and acting as a regional forum for action. 

MAPC provides technical assistance and specialized services in land use planning, water resources 
management, transportation, housing, environmental protection, economic development, public 
safety, geographic information systems (GIS), collective purchasing, data analysis and research, 
legislative and regulatory policy and the facihtation and support of inter-local partnerships. More 
information is available at www.mapc.org . 



-115- 



MAPC is governed by 101 municipal government appointees, 21 gubernatorial appointees and 13 
appointees of state and City of Boston agencies. An Executive Committee comprising 25 elected 
members oversees agency operations. The agency employs approximately 40 professional staff under 
the leadership of an executive director. Funding for MAPC activities is derived from governmental 
contracts and foundation grants and a per-capita assessment on member municipalities. 

To better serve the people who live and work in Metro Boston, MAPC has divided the region into 
eight subregions. Each subregion is overseen by a council of local leaders and stakeholders and a 
staff coordinator provides organizational and technical staff support. 

North Suburban Planning Council 

(Burlington. Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester, 
Woburn) 

The North Suburban Planning Council began 2008 with several transportation related topics 
including a presentation on the MAPC Parking Tool Kit and a discussion of the Transportation 
Improvement Program (TIP) and the Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP). The February 
meeting was focused on an overview of best management practices for streamlined local permitting 
as well as zoning reform. 

The TIP and UPWP were discussed over the course of several meetings and NSPC prepared review 
letters on both of those documents. 

The April meeting was a special region workshop devoted to stormwater management and low 
impact development. This meeting included case studies as well as information on by-laws. 

In May, the Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS) held a Walkable Communities workshop 
in Stoneham. This workshop was well attended and included a walk of several blocks in Stoneham 
center to illustrate common issues for pedestrian safety. Upon returning to town hall, the 
participants worked together in groups to develop solutions to the issues just illustrated. 

In July, NSPC made a site visit to the Residences at Martins Brook, which is the first phase of the 
40R development on the former JT Berry site in Wilmington and North Reading. The project 
developers presented an overview of the development and the group walked the site to view some of 
the special site features and amenities. 

The September meeting was devoted to a presentation by the Census Bureau on the early activities 
in preparation for the 2010 Census. A particular emphasis of this meeting was the importance of 
forming Complete Count Committees in each municipality. 

In October, NSPC learned about the Regional Pedestrian Plan and the Bike Rack program. There 
was also a discussion about broadening participation in the subregion. The year ended with a 
discussion about the guidelines for the current round of District Local Technical Assistance grants 
and the availability of new oblique aerial imagery. 

Middlesex Caoal Commission 

The Middlesex Canal Association (MCA) consists of approximately 250 dues paying members. All 
are welcome to join the Association. We host two walks, one in the spring and another in the fall and 
a bicycle ride along the canal. This year the town of Wilmington and city of Woburn were 
highlighted. These activities are becoming so popular that we are discussing doubling the events. 

We were especially pleased when Marty Sabounjian, son of Libby Sabounjian, Chairman of the 
Wilmington Board of Health, earned his Eagle Scout badge by building a kiosk at the Town Park 
near the canal. He gave us a key enabling us to add information to the panel when appropriate. 
This was part of the program "Wilmington Walks" which encourages exercise and better health in 
our community. 



-116- 



There were three lectures: Nolan Jones, Chairman of the Middlesex Canal Association, spoke of their 
trip to ride the Warwickshire Canal Ring in SW England and the Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. This huge 
wheel is the tallest rotating boat lift in the world. The second lecture was by Lance Metz of the National 
Canal Museum. He brought recently acquired old films of the Delaware Canal in operation. Thomas 
Raphael gave his recent lecture to the SIA, an archeology group. The final meeting was an update of the 
entire Canal with aerial shdes for recently notified abutters along the entire canal as part of the 
National Registry process. We feel that abutters play an enormous role in preserving the canal. 

Three issues of "TowPath Topics" were sent out. Our education program continues to prosper with 
enormous help from Traci Jansen, our third grade teacher from the Woburn Street School who visited 
our Museum with students this spring. She is now working on a plan for the Billerica school system. 

In October, we had a significant change occur. We are aU volunteers and have had the pleasure of 
having our Museum at the Faulkner Mill in North Billerica free of charge since July 2001. The owner of 
the Museum feels it is now necessary to charge rent. In order to help pay this rent, we are opening the 
Museum and actively seeking companies or groups for regular or social events. If you are planning an 
event, please contact us at 978-670-2740. 

The Middlesex Canal Commission consists of representatives appointed from each of the nine towns 
through which the canal traversed. Chairman Thomas Raphael, a retired Harvard trained engineer, has 
led a multi-town canal restoration project. The money for this endeavor will come from 1STEA/T21 
money as part of the highway budget which states that 10% of money appropriated will go for 
landscaping and restoration of old methods of transportation such as lighthouses, trains and canals. 
With President Elect Obama's plan to increase the highway appropriation to stimulate our economy, we 
feel that we have the opportunity to obtain additional funds for these projects. Working with The 
Waterfield Design Group, Inc., a plan has been presented to the Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen 
and the Community Development Technical Review Team to review. The section of canal under 
consideration consists of the area from the Maple Meadow Brook Aqueduct to Patches Pond which is 
owned by the MCA due to the generosity of Julia Fielding and Stanley Webber. We are asking the town 
to include the town-owned property from Patches Pond to Floradale Avenue over the wetlands where 
access will be gained by a conservation bridge and the section of canal in the Town Park which contains 
the famous Ox Bow turn. Details are being worked out for this once-in-a-Ufetime opportunity. 

The final draft of the National Registry appUcation has been reviewed by the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission and sent to Washington. Several sections of the canal are already on the National Register 
but this win contain the entire canal for posterity. It has been an enormous effort going through old 
records, since a canal no longer exists close to Boston. We have continued to work with the developers of 
the Boston Canal Street Project, but this bleak economy may put things on hold. 

We welcome you to join our organization. Visit our web site: ww^ w . middlesexcanal .org 




Middlesex Canal at Town Park. 



-117- 



Inspector of Buildings 

The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts builduig. plumbing, gas and wiring codes, the Town of Wilmington Zoning By-law and 
for maintaining all related records. In addition, all administrative tasks for the Board of Appeals are 
handled by this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings is Al Spaulding; the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is Paul Raffi; the Wiring 
Inspector is Frederick Sutter. Toni LaRivee serves as the secretary for the Building Inspector's office 
and the Board of Appeals. 

It is our goal to help people understand the regulations enforced by the Inspector of Buildings, how 
best to comply with those regulations and to provide assistance to residents and others who have 
questions about homes and property in the town. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to 
come and see us. 







2006 




2007 




2008 


RFSIDENTIAL 


No 




Nn 


\/ca 1 1 1 Q i"i on 

V CtiUdLlUll 


Nn 


\/ q1 1 1 oi'lOTl 
V ditlciLiUIl 


Single Family Dwellings 


36 


5,860,138 


32 


5,244,000 


22 


4,136,500 


Additions 


120 


7,043,711 


89 


4,709,607 


72 


3,290,315 


RemodeUng 


135 


1,791,527 


159 


2,372,580 


152 




Utihty Buildings 


13 


345,800 


9 


211,463 


11 


137,414 


Pools 


35 


461,370 


26 


280,422 


34 


534,318 


Miscellaneous 


51 


479.432 


50 


354,921 


95 


361.735 




390 


15,981,978 


365 


13,172,993 


386 


10,365,163 


COMMERCIAL 














New Buildings 


10 


3,084,100 


15 


24,505,344 


6 


13,426,947 


Pubhc Buildings 




















Additions 


2 


294,000 


1 


56,000 


2 


1,436,419 


Fitups 


47 


13,511,666 


52 


17,623,306 


58 


19,276,970 


Utility Buildings 


2 


79,000 














Signs 


26 


132,279 


26 


172,156 


56 


326,692 


Miscellaneous 


7 


5.056.862 


33 


1.914.106 


33 


1,410.522 




164 


22,157,885 


127 


44,270,912 


155 


35,877,550 


TOTAL 


554 


38,139,885 


492 


57,443,905 


541 


46,242,713 


REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND SUBMITTED TO TREASURER 






Building Permits 


554 


384,925.00 


492 


565,596.37 


541 


487,640.00 


Wiring Permits 


590 


85,445.00 


649 


102,867.86 


582 


90,148.00 


Gas Permits 


214 


13,010.00 


230 


15,652.50 


227 


13,745.00 


Plumbing Permits 


307 


30,455.00 


317 


42,685.00 


296 


43,770.00 


Cert, of Inspection 


30 


1,333.00 


31 


1,428.00 


47 


6,161.00 


Occupancy 


120 


6,120.00 


89 


4,450.00 


96 


4,700.00 


Copies 





40.20 





82.70 





307.55 


Court 





11.00 














Industrial Elec. Permits 


56 


8,400.00 


54 


8,100.00 


54 


8,700.00 


Board of Appeals Fees 


61 


5.965.00 


46 


5.144.00 


41 


3,900.00 




1,932 


$535,704.20 


1,908 


$746,006.43 


1,884 


659,071.55 



-118- 




Case 1-08 355 Middlesex Avenue Map 79 Parcel 31 

To acquire a variance from §6. 3. 5. 3a installation of two pylon signs for property located at 355 
Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - two pylon signs no greater than 50 square feet combined with the stipulation 
the sign illumination would be on a timer, on at dusk and off V2 hour after the last tenant 
left for the evening. 



Case 2-08 Daniel T. Hally Map 62 Parcel 37 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(extend shed dormer) for property located at 130 Federal Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
dwelling. 



Case 3-08 Cynthia Jones Map 51 Parcel 47 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 accessory apartment addition for property 
located at 23 Adams Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 4-08 Wilm. Main Rlty Ltd Partnership Map 43 Parcel 4 

To acquire a variance from §6.3.5.1 and §10.6 (wall sign) for property located at 271 Main Street. 

Granted - increase the wall sign letters to 6 feet in height and eliminate the secondary 
signs. 



Case 5-08 335-337 Main St. Wilm. LLC Map 42 Parcel 24 

To acquire a variance from §6.3.5. la (wall signs) for property located at 335 Main Street. 

Granted - increase the allowable wall signage to double the dimensions specified in the 
By-law with the condition that no individual sign will exceed the maximum allowed in the 
By-law. 



Case 6-08 SW & Sprint Spectrum LP Map R3 Parcel SOB 

To amend a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 to install 3 additional WiMax panel antennas at 
the same height as the existing antennas together with ancillary equipment cabinets at the base of 
the tower for property located at 375 Ballardvale Street. 

Granted - with the condition not to exceed 9 antennas. 



-119- 



Case 7-OS 



SW & Sprint Spectrum LP 



Map 40 Parcel 2A 



To amend a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 to add 3 additional WiMax panel antennas at the 
same height as the existing antennas together with 2 outdoor equipment cabinets within the fenced 
compound for property located at 625 Main Street. 

Granted - with the condition not to exceed 12 antennas. 



Case 8-08 Mark & John Murphy Map 8 Parcel 61 A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 accessory apartment for property located at 29 
Winston Avenue. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 9-08 Craig Hanson Map 59 Parcel 48 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(remove an existing deck and build a mudroom, farmer's porch and one-car garage) for property 
located on 20 Strout Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
dwelling with the condition - no closer than 15 feet from the side and 20 feet from the 
rear lot lines. 



Case 10-08 Dennis Rooney Map 40 Parcel 141B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 for an accessory apartment addition for property 
located on 36 Lowell Street. 

Granted - meets the requirements of the By-law. 



Case 1 1-08 Wilm. Main Rlty Ltd Partnership Map 43 Parcel 4 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.4 and §3.8.5 for a Limited Service Restaurant to 
be known as D'Angelo with 34 seats for property located on 271 Main Street. 

Granted - 34 seats. 



Case 12-08 Corporate Environmental Advisors Map 40 Parcel 5 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.3.1 to construct a 
treatment shed less than one foot from the side yard lot line and less than 8 feet from the front lot 
line for property located at 586 Main Street. 

Granted - shed not to exceed 10 feet x 15 feet, 9 feet high with the 10 foot side parallel to 
the side lot line, no less than one foot from the side and 8 feet from the front lot lines, the 
unique circumstance and shape of the lot being the hardship. 



-120- 



Case 13-08 Bruce Amazeen c/o Jackson Bldrs. Map 32 Parcel 1 10 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(remove existing 12' x 20' garage and construct a new 16' x 22' garage) for property located on One 
Ferguson Road. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing dwelling. 



Case 14-08 MMM Realty Trust Map 63 Parcel 5 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(remove and replace existing door enclosure) for property located on 187 Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - increase the nonconformity of the original structure and allow the existing 
entry addition to remain. 



Case 15-08 Windsor Parking LLC c/o R. Peterson Map 73 Parcel 53 & 53B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.4.6 to construct an assisted living facility on 
property located at 320-322 Lowell Street. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 16-08 RCB Family Trust c/o D. Brown Map 6 Parcel 99 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (to 
remove existing dwelling and construct a new dwelHng) for property located on 297 Burlington 
Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
structure. 



Case 17-08 Raymond C. Ventura c/o D. Brown Map 69 Parcel 86 

To acquire authorization in accordance with M.G.L. Ch. 41, §8 IE to construct a single family dwelling 
on a lot located on a private way, existing, but not made part of the Official Map for property located 
on Lexington Street. 

Granted - authorize the construction of a single family dwelling on a private way, 
existing, but not shown on the OfHcial Map. 



Case 18-08 4* of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.1.9 for a carnival to run from July 1 to July 6, 
2008 for property located on 159 Church Street. 

Granted - to run from July 1 to July 6, 2008. 



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Case 19-08 



Theresa Gaud 



Map 34 Parcel 33 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(remove existing room and deck and replace with a 8 foot x 24.7 foot two-story addition) for property 
located on 138 Grove Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
structure. 



Case 20-08 Valley Properties do Poyant Signs Map 43 Parcel 5 

To acquire a variance from §6.3.5. la for 223.86 square feet of additional wall signage for CVS for 
property located at 240 Main Street. 

Granted - no more than 84.43 square feet of additional signage for the side facing Main 
Street. 



Case 21-08 Paul LaFauci Map 49 Parcel 132 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §4.2 to construct an accessory apartment addition on 
property located at 5 Allen Park Drive. 

Granted - meets the criteria of the By-law. 



Case 22-08 Metro PCS Mass LLC Map 40 Parcel 2A 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 to install six antenna and associated ground 
equipment to an existing telecommunications facility for property located on 625 Main Street. 

Granted - six additional antennas and equipment at the existing tower. 



Case 23-08 Metro PCS Mass LLC Map 56 Parcel 122 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 to install six antenna and associated ground 
equipment to an existing telecommunications facility for property located on 65 Industrial Way. 

Granted - six additional antennas and equipment at the existing tower. 



Case 24A-08 Kaiser Realty Trust Map 6 Parcel 40 

To appeal the decision of the Inspector of Buildings. 

Denied - the decision of the Inspector of Buildings in regard to the issuance of a building permit as 
referenced in Town Counsel's Advisory Opinion No. 77 is upheld. 



-122- 



Case 24B-08 



Kaiser Realty Trust 



Map 6 Parcel 40 



To acquire a variance for a lot having insufficient width and depth for a single family dwelling and 
relief from the Official Map for property located on 12 Polk Street. 

Granted - relief from the Official Map under §81y Hnding that there is practical difficulty 
and unnecessary hardship in complying with requirements that the lot be on a way on 
the Official Map or part of an approved subdivision as reference in Town Counsel's 
Advisory Opinion No. 77. 



Case 25-08 John Bonica Map 11 Parcel 12C 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.5 for a deck to be 16.5 
feet from the side lot line and 14.2 feet from the rear lot line when 25 feet is required for property 
located on 5 Edgeworth Street. 

Granted - no closer to the rear and side lot lines than 15 feet. 



Case 26-08 Metro PCS Mass LLC Map Rl Parcel 18 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 to install three antenna and associated ground 
equipment to an existing telecommunications facility for property located on 26 Upton Drive. 

Granted - three antenna and associated ground equipment. 



Case 27-08 Thomas E. Woods Map 41 Parcel 77 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(construct a 2"'' story addition above the kitchen) for property located on 31 Columbia Street. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
dwelling. 



Case 28-08 David & Susan McCann Map 90 Parcel 13 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(construct a portico over the front steps and landing) for property located on 7 Catherine Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
dwelling. 



Case 29-08 Back Bay Sign Map 43 Parcel 5 

To acquire a variance from §6.3.5.2 for five directional signs exceeding the square footage allowed for 
property located on 240 Main Street. 

Granted - five directional signs not to exceed 3.7 square feet per sign. 



-123- 



Case 30-08 



Ramachandran Ramanan 



Map 9 Parcel 27 



To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table 11) §5.2.4 and §5.3.4.5 for an 
addition to be 23.6 feet from the front lot line when 50 feet is required for property located on 16 
Winston Avenue. 

Denied - no hardship. 



Case 31-08 Joseph Capozzi Map 32 Parcel 42B 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(second floor landing and stairs) for property located on 70 Shawsheen Avenue. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing nonconforming 
dwelling. 



Case 32-08 Ryan Burgdoerfer/Sprint Map 56 Parcel 122 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 to install six additional antennas to existing 
installation for property located on 65 Industrial Way. 

Granted - six additional antennas. 



Case 33-08 William Harper Map 80 Parcel 3 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 for a farmer's porch 
to be 24.7 feet from the front lot Une when 30 feet is required for property located on 8 Oakdale 
Road. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 34-08 Dina M. Smith Map 35 Parcel 53 

To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 for a sunroom to be 
27.3 feet from the front yard on New Hampshire Road when 40 feet is required for property located 
on 19 Vermont Road. 

Granted - for a sunroom to be 27.3 feet from the front yard on New Hampshire Road. 



Case 35-08 Frank Ingram Map 60 Parcel 34 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure (16' x 
26' addition 22.8 feet from the front lot line when existing dwelling is 23.4 feet from the front lot line) 
for property located on 9 Wing Road. 

Granted - no more detrimental to the neighborhood than the existing structure. 



-124- 



Case 36-08 



David Barresi 



Map 70 Parcel 88 



To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.1.6.4 to increase a nonconforming structure 
(second floor addition). 

RE-ADVERTISE - To acquire a variance from Standard Dimensional Regulations (Table II) §5.2.4 to 
construct a second floor addition 25 feet from the front lot Une when 40 feet is required for property 
located on 7 Martens Street. 

Granted - to amend Case #49-69 and allow the second-floor addition. 



Case 37-08 WUm. Main Rlty Ltd Partnership Map 43 Parcel 4C 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §3.5.5 and §3.8.4 for a General Service Restaurant 
for property located on 269 Main Street. 

Granted - General Service Restaurant. 



Case 38-08 Metro PCS Mass LLC Map 24 Parcel 8 IB 

To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 and §3.4.8, to replace an existing Boston Edison 
81 foot utility pole with a 91 foot utility pole and install three panel antennas with ground 
equipment. 

RE-ADVERTISE - To acquire a Special Permit in accordance with §6.8 and §3.4.8, to replace an 
existing Boston Edison 81 foot utihty pole with a 91 foot utility pole and install three panel antennas 
with ground equipment and a variance to replace an existing 81 foot utihty pole with a 91 foot 
telecommunications pole in a residential zone for property located on 910 Main Street. 

Granted - variance to allow an existing 81 foot wooden pole with a 91 foot wooden pole. 

AND 

Granted - Special Permit to replace an existing 81 foot pole with a 91 foot wooden pole 
along with ground equipment. 



Case 39-08 355 Middlesex Ave LP II Map 79 Parcel 31 

To acquire a variance from §6. 3. 5. 3a for an additional freestanding sign on a lot where one 
freestanding sign is allowed for property located on 355 Middlesex Avenue. 

Granted - an additional freestanding sign as described in the submitted plan. 



Case 40-08 Raymond C. Ventura, c/o D. Brown Map 69 Parcel 86 

To appeal the decision of the Inspector of Buildings for property located on 5 Lexington Street. 
Overturn the Inspector's decision and instruct him to issue a building permit. 



-125- 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the Constable in each of the six 
(6) precincts. 

Presidential Primary January 14, 2008 

Annual Town Meeting and Town Election April 10, 2008 

State Primary September 3, 2008 

State/Presidential Election October 23, 2008 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY -FEBRUARY 5, 2008 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections at the Boutwell School- Precincts 1 
and 2; Wildwood School- Precincts 3 and 4; and Town Hall- 121 Glen Road Precincts 5 and 6 on 
Tuesday, February 5, 2008 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the candidates of the political parties for the 
following officers: 



Presidential Preference For the Commonwealth 

State Committee Man Essex & Middlesex 

State Committee Woman 1^' Essex & Middlesex 

Members of the Democratic Town Committee 
Members of the Republican Town Committee 
Members of the Green Rainbow Town Committee 
Members of Working Families Town Committee 



Democratic Party 
Presidential Preference 



John R. Edwards 104 

Hillary CUnton 2,957 

Joseph R. Biden, Jr. 12 

Christopher J. Dodd 6 

Mike Gravel 2 

Barack Obama 1,263 

Dennis J. Kucinich 10 

Bill Richardson 4 

No preference 30 

Blanks 14 

All Others 14 

Total 4,416 



Republican Party 
Presidential Preference 



John McCain 928 

Fred Thompson 3 

Tom Tancredo 2 

Duncan Hunter 2 

Mike Huckabee 79 

Mitt Romney 1,443 

Ron Paul 54 

Rudy Giuliani 19 

No preference 7 

Blanks 

All Others 3 

Total 2,540 



State Committee Man 
1«' Essex & Middlesex 

Daniel J. Lauzon 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



2,605 
16 
1,795 
4,416 



State Committee Man 
Essex & Middlesex 

John N. Racho 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



1,367 
12 
1,161 
2,540 



-126- 



State Committee Woman 
1st Essex & Middlesex 



State Committee Woman 
1«' Essex & Middlesex 



Kathleen A. Pasquina 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



1.737 
4,416 



2,665 
14 



Christina A. Bain 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



1.193 
2,540 



1,330 
17 



Green-Rainbow Party 



Presidential Preference 

Jared Ball 
Ralph Nader 
Elaine Brown 
Kat Swift 
Cynthia McKinney 
Kent Mesplay 
No Preference 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 







3 

2 


5 



State Committee Woman 

No Nominations 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



No Nominations 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



State Committee Man 



5 

5 



5 

5 



Working Family Party 

No Nominations were made and no ballots were cast in the Presidential Preference, State Committee 
Man or State Committee Woman. 

TOWN COMMITTEES 
Democratic Town Committee 

The following people were elected to the Democratic Town Committee on February 5, 2008: 

George W. Hooper 
Alice M. Hooper 
James R. Miceli 
Richard Pedi 
Anna M. Visconti 
Lorraine A. Casey 
WiUiam J. Dowd 
Cristina Warren 
James F. Banda 
Americo M. Enos 
Daniel C. Wandell, Jr. 
Dwight F. Maxwell 
Gary B. DePalma 
Michael J. Bielecki 



-127- 



Republican Town Committee 

The following people were elected to the Republican Town Committee on February 5, 2008: 

John P. Goggin 
Michael M. Hutchison 
Jean M. Hutchison 
William G. Hooper. Jr. 
John M. Walsh 
Janet M. Walsh 
Michael A. Mattialiano 
Catherine V. Goggin 

The polls were opened at 7:00 a.m. by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. George at Town Hall, (Precincts 5 & 6) 
Carolyn M. Kenney, Asst. Town Clerk, at the Boutwell School (Precincts 1 & 2) and Alice Hooper, Board 
of Registrars, at the Wildwood School (Precincts 3 & 4,) and the polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. A total of 
9.501 residents voted. Democrats - 4,416; Republicans - 2,540; Green Rainbow Party - 5; and Working 
Families - 0. 66°o of our 15,032 registered voters came to the polls. 




Scalekeeper's Office on Middlesex Avenue. 



•128- 




ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 26, 2008 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

TO: Constable of the Town of Wilmington 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices to wit: Two 
Selectmen for the term of three years; two members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
one member of the Housing Authority for the term of five years; and one member of the Redevelopment 
Authority for the term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in the Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, 
on Saturday the third day of May, A.D. 2008 at 10:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following 
articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was opened by the Town Clerk, Sharon A. George, at 
the Town Hall, Board of Registrar Member William Hooper, at the Boutwell School and the Assistant 
Town Clerk, Carolyn M. Kenney at the Wildwood School. 

All voting equipment was in place in each precinct. The checkers were prepared with their voting hsts 
and everything was in readiness at 8:00 a.m. and the polls were declared open. 

The results were as follows: 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN for three vears (vote for two) Voted 

Raymond N. Lepore 467 

Michael V. McCoy 433 

Others 41 

Blanks 267 

Total 1,208 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three vears (vote for two) 

Steven J. Higgins 455 

Leslee A. Quick 484 

Others 254 

Blanks 15 

Total 1,208 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for five vears (vote for one) 

Robert C. DiPasquale 505 

Others 13 

Blanks 86 

Total 604 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for five vears (vote for one) 

Write-in - Suzanne Sullivan (received 4 votes- declined) 58 

Others 

Blanks 546 

Total 604 



The results of this election were ready at 9:00 p.m. and the elected officers present were sworn in to the 
faithful performance of their duties by Town Clerk Sharon A. George. The total number of votes cast 
was 604, which represented 3.9% of Wilmington's 15,295 registered voters. 



-129- 



TOWN MEETING - MAY 3, 2008 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a quorum present at 11:18 a.m. (150 by the Town of Wilmington By-Laws) James Stewart, Town 
Moderator, opened the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. This year the colors were presented by the 
Wilmington Minutemen. The Moderator then read the names of departed town workers, members of 
committees and boards who had passed away during the past year, also Town Meeting paused in tribute 
to our servicemen and women and the hope that they will all return safely home. A moment of silence 
was observed for all. He then introduced our newly elected and re-elected town officials. 

MOTION: On motion of Chairman Michael Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted UNANIMOUSLY that the Moderator suspend the reading of the Warrant and take up and make 
reference to each article by number. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. 

MOTION: On motion of Michael Caira, Town Manager, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY that no action be taken. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of 
previous years; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira, and duly seconded, it was voted UNANIMOUSLY by the 
Town of Wilmington not to adopt Article 3. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to enter into an agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, during Fiscal Year 2009 and for a term not to exceed three years, which will permit the 
Town of Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such institutions in return for said institutions 
providing banking services; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, it was voted UNANIMOUSLY by the 
Town of Wilmington to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
enter into an agreement, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53F of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, with one or more banks doing business in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
during Fiscal Year 2008 and for a term not to exceed three years, which will permit the Town of 
Wilmington to maintain funds on deposit with such institutions in return for said institutions 
providing banking services. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the 
salaries of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether 
by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or take any other action related thereto. 

MOTION: On motion of John Doherty, and seconded by Mr. Caira, it was voted 
UNANIMOUSLY by the Town of Wilmington to appropriate for the expenses of the Town and 
the salaries of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or otherwise. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen - Legislative 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Furnishings 
TOTAL 

Selectmen - Elections 
Salaries 



4,200 
14,260 

6,000 
24,460 



27,724 



■130- 




Expenses 9.260 

Total 36,984 

Registrars of Voters 

Salaries 1,875 

Expenses 6.150 

Total 8,025 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 1,330 

Expenses 8.025 

Total 9,355 

Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 126,065 

Other Salaries 281,619 

Expenses 72,228 

Furnishings/Equipment 2.200 

Total 482,112 

Town Accountant 

Salary -Town Accountant 98,584 

Other Salaries 216,793 

Expenses 2.560 

Total 317,937 

Town Treasurer/Collector 

Salary - Town Treasurer/Collector 83,946 

Other Salaries 167,445 

Expenses 22,100 

Amt. Cert. Tax Title 20.000 

Total 293,491 

Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 65,347 

Other Salaries 103,881 

Expenses 3.475 

Total 172,703 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 95,943 

Other Salaries 86,910 

Expenses 62,690 

Appraisals & Inventory 104,584 

Furnishings & Equipment 

ATB Costs 

Total 350,127 

Town Counsel 

Legal Services 212,500 

Expenses 7.500 

Total 220,000 



-131- 



Permanent Building Committee 

Salaries 450 

Expenses 

Total 450 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 1.915 844 

PUBLIC SAFET\' 

Police 

Salary - Chief 106,734 

Salary - Deputy Chief 87,768 

Salary - Lieutenants 285,895 

Salary - Sergeants 366,283 

Salary - Patrolmen 1,885,703 

Salary - Clerical 91,456 

Salary - Overtime 395,000 

Salary - Paid Holidays 1 15,589 

Salarj' - SpeciaUsts 12,350 

Salary - Night Differential 44,616 

Salary - Incentive 411,756 

Sick Leave Buyback 27,538 

Expenses 234,796 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 4,065,220 

Fire 

Salary - Chief 106,734 

Salary - Deputy Chief 75,468 

Salary - Lieutenants 424,734 

Salary - Privates 1,823,820 

Salary - Clerk 48,639 

Salary - Part Time 16,250 

Salary - Overtime 371,000 

Salary - Paid Holidays 121,366 

Salary - EMT & Incentive Pay 9,025 

Salary - Fire Alarms 14,420 

Salary - Sick Leave Buy-Back 33, 196 

Expenses 112,376 

Furnishing & Equipment 

Total 3,157,028 

Pubhc Safety Central Dispatch 

Personnel Services 515,687 

Contractual Services 20,450 

Material & Supplies 3,750 

Furnishings & Equipment 4,000 

Total 543,887 

Animal Control 

Salaries 35,360 

Expenses 2.325 

Total 37,685 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 7.803.820 



-132- 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Personnel Services 
Superintendent 
Engineer - Full Time 
Engineer - Part Time 
Highway - Full Time 
Highway - Overtime 
Highway - Part Time 
Highway - Seasonal 

Highway - Stream Maintenance Seasonal 

Tree - Full Time 

Tree - Overtime 

Parks/Grounds - Full Time 

Parks/Grounds — Overtime 

Cemetery - Full Time 

Cemetery - Part Time 

Cemetery Overtime 

Snow/Ice - Extra Help - Overtime 

Total 



Contractual Services 
Engineer 

Engineer - Training/Conference 
Highway 

Highway - Repairs/Town Vehicles 
Highway - Training/Conference 
Tree 

Parks/Grounds 
Cemetery 

Road Machinery - Repair 

Public Street Lights 

Rubbish Collection & Disposal 

Snow & Ice - Repairs 

Snow & Ice - Miscellaneous Services 

Total 



Materials & Supplies 
Engineer 
Highway 

Highway Construction & Road Improvements 
Highway-Gas, OH, Tires (Other) 
Highway-Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 
Stream Maintenance - Expenses 
Tree 

Parks/Grounds 

Cemetery 

Drain Projects 

Snow & Ice - Salt & Sand 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 

Total 

Furnishings & Equipment 



100,766 
198,577 
12,160 
1,089,550 
59,550 


11,200 
11,200 
166,408 
8,580 
338,924 
18,370 
129,946 
6,760 
9,860 
160.240 
2,322,336 



3,200 
2,000 
79,705 
120,900 
3,100 
5,000 
24,000 
4,100 
80,000 
259,000 
1,867,650 
17,500 
143.600 
2,609,755 



4,800 
39,000 
82,000 
184,960 
116,240 
1,000 
6,500 
19,000 
13,650 
55,000 
164,640 
4.000 
690,790 

37,000 



-133- 



SEWER 

Personnel Services 69, 1 76 

Maintenance/Operations 76,530 

Total 145,706 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 5.805.587 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty, seconded by Mr. Caira, the Wilmington Town Meeting 
voted UNANIMOUSLY to approve the appropriations for the FY09 Public Works Department 
budget. 

COMMUNITY' DE\nELOPMENT 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 78,259 

Other Salaries 178,549 

Expenses 9,980 

Mental Health 35,000 

Furnishings & Equipment 350 

Total 302,138 

Sealer of Weights/Measures 

Salaries 5,166 

Expenses 200 

Total 5,366 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 76,031 

Other Salaries 208,617 

Expenses 10,175 

Furnishings & Equipment 1.500 

Total 296,323 

Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 74,067 

Other Salaries 122,227 

Expenses 4,705 

Furnishings/Equipment 1,200 

Total 202,199 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 806.026 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Salary - Superintendent 93,695 

Other salaries 2,202,230 

Overtime 47,750 

Part Time Seasonal 11,20 

Heating 1,054,600 

Electricity 165,000 

Utihties 110,000 

Expenses 476,385 

Furnishings/Equipment Q 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 4.160.860 



-134- 



HUMAN SERVICES 



Veterans' Aid/Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 49,310 

Expenses 1,600 

Assistance - Veterans 180.000 

Total 230,919 

Library 

Salary - Director 78,783 

Other Salaries 664,386 

Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 32,947 

Expenses 145,461 

Furnishings & Equipment 14.215 

Total ' 877,843 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 63,498 

Other Salaries 42,722 

Expenses 6,500 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 112,720 

Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 63,498 

Other Salaries 108,172 

Expenses 37,767 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 209,437 

Historical Commission 

Salaries 20,604 

Expenses 6,750 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 27,354 

Commission on Disabilities 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 1.516.213 

SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 29,259,500 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 

Technical High School District ^ 3,260,000 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 32.519.500 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 2,916,275 

PubUc Safety 921,300 

General Government 74,839 

Sewer 134,568 

Water 
Interest on Anticipation of Notes & 

Authorization Fees & Miscellaneous Debt 5,000 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 4.051.982 



-135- 



UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance 606,500 

Employee Health & Life Insurance 7,360,120 

Veterans' Retirement 13,008 

Employee Retirement Unused Sick Leave 60,000 

Medicare Employer's Contribution 485,000 

Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 125,000 

Local Transportation & Training Conferences 5,000 

Out-of-State Travel 1,500 

Computer Maintenance Expenses 185,000 

Records Storage 

Annual Audit 20,000 

Ambulance Billing 25,000 

Town Report 10,000 

Professional & Technical Services 125,000 

Reserve Fund 400.000 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 9,421,628 

TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 35.481.760 

STATUTORY CHARGES 

Current Year Overlay 700,000 

Retirement Contributions 3,588,132 

Offset Items 46,014 

Special Education 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 446,441 

MAPC (Ch. 688 of 1963) 6,345 

RMV Non-Renewal Surcharge 16,060 

Metro Air Pollution Control District 6,475 

Mosquito Control Program 48,126 

M.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 1,787,470 

Criminal Justice Training 

School Choice 17,500 

Charter Schools 39,410 

Essex County Technical Institute 13,063 

TOTAL STATUTORY CHARGES 6.715.036 



ESTIMATED AVAILABLE FUNDS 
Tax Levy 
Local Receipts 
Local Receipts - Sewer 
Local Aid 
Free Cash 

Water Dept. Available Funds 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Cemetery Trust Fund - Interest 
Capital Stabilization Fund 
NESWC Funds 
Provision for Abates Surplus 
Capital Project Closeouts 

TOTAL ESTIMATED FY 2008 AVAILABLE FUNDS 75.717.894 

MAIN MOTION: On motion of Mr. John Doherty, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmingti 
voted UNANIMOUSLY to accept the Fiscal Year 2009 Budget. 



51,721,195 
6,270,000 
2,632,247 

14,370,869 


663,583 
20,000 
40,000 






-136- 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from any available funds, or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase of new and/or replacement 
capital equipment, including but not hmited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale, 
trade-in, conveyance or other disposition of any equipment being so replaced, such funds to be spent by 
the town department, so indicated, with the approval of the Town Manager, and to the extent set forth in 
Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950 the Board of Selectmen, as follows: 

Police Department 

Purchase of five (5) replacement police cruisers. 

Fire Department 

Purchase of one (1) pick-up truck. 

School Department 

Purchase of two (2) replacement standard minivans. 
Department of Public Works 

Purchase of two (2) replacement one-ton trucks for the Highway and Tree Divisions; one (1) six-wheel 
dump truck for the Cemetery Division and one (1) sewer and stormwater pipe cleaning Vactor truck for 
the Highway and Sewer Divisions; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Police Cruisers : On motion of Mr. Michael McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted UNANIMOUSLY the amount of One Hundred Forty Four Thousand-Seven-Hundred 
Dollars ($144,700) for the purchase of five (5) police cruisers 

Fire Truck : On motion of Mr. Raymond Lepore, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted UNANIMOUSLY the amount of Forty thousand Dollars ($40,000.) 

School Department : On motion of Mr. Charles Fiore, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY the amount of Forty Thousand Dollars ($40,000.) 

Department of Public Works : On motion of Mr. Louis Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted UNANIMOUSLY the amount of Four-Hundred-Seventy-Four Thousand 
Dollars ($106,000 - 2 one ton trucks for Highway, $108,000 for six- wheel dump truck for 
Cemetery and $260,000 for a Vactor truck for sewer.) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purchase of a replacement police 
communications system for the Police Department; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Michael Newhouse, seconded by Mr. West, the Town of Wilmington 
voted UNANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate, transfer funds or borrow pursuant to any 
applicable statute a sum of One Hundred Two Thousand-Four Hundred Thirty-Eight Dollars 
($102,438) for the purchase of replacement police communications system for the PoUce 
Department; or take any other action related thereto. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the installation of a suspended ceiling and 
the installation of replacement lighting in the first floor at the Wilmington Memorial Library; or take 
any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 



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MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
I'NANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow pursuant to 
any applicable statute a sum of money for the installation of a suspended ceiling and the 
installation of replacement lighting in the first floor at the Wilmington Memorial Library; or 
take any other action related thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for engineering, bid preparation and other 
professional services for the design of the Main Street Sewer Interceptor construction project which will 
enable the town to repair approximately 3,100 linear feet of pipeline; or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Fiore, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow pursuant to 
any applicable statute a sum of One Hundred-Twenty-Two Thousand Dollars ($122,000), for 
engineering, bid preparation and other professional services for the design of the Main Street 
Sewer Interceptor construction project which will enable the town to repair approximately 3,100 
linear feet of pipehne; or take any other action related thereto. 

ARTICLE 10. To see what sum the Town will vote to transfer into various line items of the Fiscal Year 
2008 operating budget from other line items of said budget and from other available funds; or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Caira, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to transfer funds to various line items of the Fiscal Year 2008 operating budget 
from other line items of said budget and from other available funds as follows: 



Transfer From 

Police Salary, Lieutenants $ 40,000 

Public Safety Central Dispatch-Personnel Services 15,000 

Public Works, Personnel Services, Engineer-Full Time 25,000 

Public Works, Contractual Services -Rubbish Collection 100,000 

Pubhc Buildings - Other Salaries 20,000 

Unclassified Reserve - Insurance 30,000 

Unclassified Reserve - Employee Health and Life Insurance 300,000 

Unclassified Reserve - Professional & Technical Services 50.000 

Total $ 580,000 

Transfer To: 

Fire, Salary - Overtime $ 85,000 

Public Works, Contractual Services - Snow, Ice & Misc. 60,000 

Public Works, Materials & SuppUes - Gas, Oil, Tires (other) 40,000 

Public Works, Materials & Supplies - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 20,000 

Public Works, Materials & Supplies - Snow, Ice Sand & Salt 55,000 

Public Buildings - Heating Fuel 290,000 

Public Buildings - Electricity 30,000 

Total $ 580,000 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen 
work opportunities for services rendered to the Town in accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen Tax 
Work-Off Program; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 



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MOTION: On motion of Mr. Lepore, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY o raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow pursuant to 
any applicable statute a sum of Fifteen- Thousand Three Hundred Sixty Dollars ($15,360) for the 
purpose of providing senior citizen work opportunities for services rendered to the Town in 
accordance with the Town's Senior Citizen Tax Work-off Program. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of money for the observance of Memorial Day and 
Veterans' Day; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow pursuant to 
any applicable statute a the sum of Six Thousand Dollars ($6,000) for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day; or take any other action related thereto. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute the sum of $750.00 each (a total of $1,500) for the purpose of 
renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee- 
Ellsworth Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Wilmington Post 136 of the American Legion; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to raise and appropriate, transfer from the available funds or borrow pursuant 
to any applicable statute the sum of Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00 each, for a total of 
$1,500.00) for the Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse and the American Legion Clubhouse. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize or reauthorize as the case may be, revolving 
accounts pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E V2 for the various boards, commissions, 
departments and agencies of the Town; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Fiore, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY that the Town reauthorize the following revolving accounts pursuant to MGL 
Chapter 44, Section 53 /4 as follows: 

First a Compost Bin Revolving Fund with an estabhshed spending limited of $4,500, with the 
soiirce of revenue being the sale of composting bins, the spending authority being the Town 
Manager and the purpose for which money may be spent is the purchase of composting bins; and 
second, a Subsurface Sewage Disposal Upgrade Revolving Fund with an estabhshed spending 
limit of $200,000, with the source of revenues being betterment receipts and other loan 
repayments from property owners participating in said program, the purpose of expenditures 
being the repair and upgrade of subsurface sewage disposal systems and the repayment to the 
Massachusetts Water Pollution Abatement Trust of any funds advanced to the town for this 
purpose, and the spending authority being the Board of Health with the approval of the Town 
Manager. 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn #22) To see if the Town wiU vote to accept as town ways the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen (Massachusetts 



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General l^wvs Chapter 4 1 and Chapter 82, as amended) and shown on certain plans described below, 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift, eminent domain or otherwise, such 
land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, 
and further to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow pursuant to any applicable 
statute a sum of money to be spent by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen 
for such purposes; or take any other action related thereto. 

Chisholm Way: as shown on a plan, "Mink Run Extension - Wilmington, Massachusetts - Definitive 
Subdivision Plan - Lot Layout", Scale - one inch equals fifty feet (1" = 50'), prepared by GCG Associates, 
Inc.. dated May 28. 2003, as revised to 9/14/04, which plan is recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds in Plan Book 216, as Plan 62, which plan is on file with the office of the Town Manager and the 
office of the Town Clerk. 

Sequoia Drive: as shown on the plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land Sequoia Drive 
Wilmington, MA. " dated December 11, 2007, Scale 1"= 40', drawn by Dana F. Perkins Inc. Consulting 
Engineers and Land Surveyors , 1049 East Street Tewksbury MA 01876, which plan is on file with the 
office of the Town Manager and the office of the Town Clerk. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article as these streets were constructed through 
subdivision control and the roadway has been completed. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Newhouse, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to approve Article 15. 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn #28) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to erect a 
permanent monument in memory of Army Private First Class John F. Landry, Jr. who was killed in 
action on March 17, 2007 while serving his country in Iraq; further to authorize the Board to determine 
a suitable location therefore from among the various properties owned or controlled by the town, and 
further, to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow pursuant to any applicable 
statute a sum of money to be spent by the Town Manager for the design, construction, installation and 
erection of such monument; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Cimaglia, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to approve the monument in memory of Army Private First Class John F. 
Landry. 

ARTICLE 17. (drawn #23) To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court and to request its 
representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town in the form 
set forth below, it being the intent of the Town to authorize the General Court to make constructive 
changes to the text hereof, subject to the approval of the Wilmington Board of Selectmen, to accomplish 
the public policy purposes hereof; or to take any other action related thereto: 

AN ACT TO PROVIDE FOR AN ELECTED PLANNING BOARD 
IN THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

SECTION 1. The Ust of elected positions within the Town as set forth in Section 2 of Chapter 592 of the 
Acts of 1950 ("An Act EstabUshing A Town Manager Form of Government for the Town of 
Wilmington," hereinafter referred to as "the Town Manager Act") is hereby amended by 
adding the words "the Planning Board" after the words "the Selectmen". 



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SECTION 2. The Town Manager Act is hereby amended by adding the following new section: 

"SECTION 3A. Election of Planning Board. At the first town election following acceptance 
of this act, there shall be elected two members of the Planning Board for three years, two 
members for two years, and one member for one year. Upon the qualification of the 
members so elected, the term of office of the Planning Board then existing shall terminate. 
At each annual town election thereafter, the voters shall elect members for the three-year 
terms to replace those whose terms are about to expire." 

SECTION 3. The list of positions appointed by the Town Manager as set forth in Section 12(a) of the 
Town Manager Act is hereby amended by striking out the words, "Planning Board". 

SECTION 4. Vacancies arising among the members of the Planning Board shall be filled in accordance 
with Section 11 of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. McCoy, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington defeated Article 
17 for a special act. 



ARTICLE 18: (drawn #16) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by adding the 
following new section: 

10.3 Board of Appeals - The Town of Wilmington Board of Appeals is hereby designated as 
the Board of Appeals required by Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws as 
constituted on the date of the acceptance of this recodification. This recodification shall 
replace any and all prior actions of the Town regarding the Board of Appeals. 

10.3.1 The Board of Appeals shall also act as the Board of Appeals required under the 
provisions of Section 81Z of Chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws, as 
amended, relating to subdivision control. 

10.3.2 Appointment of members: The Board of Appeals shall consist of five (5) members 
nominated and appointed by the Board of Selectmen. There shall be no associate 
members on the Board of Appeals. 

10.3.3 Terms: Appointment shall be for three-year terms, so arranged that the term of 
no more than two members shall expire each year. 

10.3.4 Residency and removal of members: Members of the Board of Appeals shall be 
residents of the Town of Wilmington, and shall hold office during such residence 
until their successors are duly qualified and may be removed for just cause after 
hearing by the Board of Selectmen. 

10.3.5 Vacancies: To be filled by the Board of Selectmen. 

10.3.6 The Board of Appeals shall act on all matters over which it has jurisdiction and 
in the manner prescribed by the following provisions. 

10.3.6.1 To hear and decide appeals from any decisions of the Inspector of 
Buildings. 

10.3.6.2 To hear and decide applications for special permits except as 
otherwise provided in this By-law. 

10.3.6.3 To hear and decide petitions for variances from this By-law. 

10.3.6.4 To hear and decide applications under Section 81E of Chapter 41of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, for the issuance of a permit for the 
erection of a building on a lot in a subdivision approval under the 
subdivision control law and on a lot not on a 



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way placed on or made part of the Official Map when the Board finds 
that enforcement of the foregoing provision would entail practical 
difficulty or unnecessary hardship and that the circumstances do not 
require that the building be related to a way shown on a subdivision 
plan or the Official Map. 

10.3.6.5 To take action on any other matter as may be assigned to the Board 
by the General Laws or the By-laws of the Town. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Lepore, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 150 in 
favor and 2, motion passes by two-thirds vote. 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn #15) To see if the Town will vote to accept M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Sections 1 
through 16, Expedited Permitting; or to take any other action related thereto. 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 1 states that "[n]otwithstanding any general or special law, charter 
provision, by-law or ordinance to the contrary this chapter shall apply upon its acceptance by a 
city or town." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 2 states that "the following words shall, unless the context clearly 
requires otherwise, have the following meanings:- 

"Governing body", ... in towns the board of selectmen. 

"Interagency permitting board", the board ... established to review and approve or deny 
municipal priority development site proposals and to grant and administer technical 
assistance grants. 

"Issuing authority", a local board, commission, department or other municipal entity that 
is responsible for issuing permits, granting approvals or otherwise involved in land use 
development including redevelopment of existing buildings and structures. 

"Permit", a permit formal determination, order of conditions, license, certificate, 
authorization, registration, plan approval, zoning relief or other approval or 
determination with respect to the use or development of land, buildings, or structures 
required by any issuing authority including but not limited to those under statutory 
authorities contained in Chapter 40A, Sections 81A to 81J, inclusive, and Sections 8 IX to 
81GG, inclusive, of Chapter 41, Sections 40 and 40A of Chapter 131, Sections 26 to 32, 
inclusive, of Chapter 111, Chapter 40C, Sections 13 and 14 of Chapter 148, Chapter 772 
of the Acts of 1975, or otherwise under state law or local by-law or ordinance, and all 
associated regulations, by-laws and rules, but not including building permits or 
approvals pursuant to Sections 810 to 81W, inclusive, of Chapter 41. "Permit" shall not 
include the decision of an agency to dispose of property under its management or control; 
predevelopment reviews conducted by the municipal office of permit coordination or a 
technical review team; or permits granted by the Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority. 

"Priority development site", a privately or publicly owned property that is: (1) 
commercially or industrially zoned; (2) eligible under applicable zoning provisions, 
including special permits or other discretionary permits, for the development or 
redevelopment of a building at least 50,000 square feet of gross floor area in new or 
existing buildings or structures; and (3) designated as a priority development site by the 
board. ..." 

"Secretary", the secretary of the Executive Office of Economic Development. 



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"Technical review team", an informal working group consisting of representatives of the 
various issuing authorities designed by the head of their issuing authority to review 
requests submitted under this chapter. The technical review team shall not include 
members of the zoning board of appeals." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 3 states that "(a) [f]or a property to receive a designation as a 
priority development site, the governing body, after approval by a town meeting in a town, shall 
file a formal proposal with the board. The proposal shall include: (1) a detailed description of the 
property; (2) good faith commitment to comply with this chapter; (3) written authorization of the 
property owner; and (4) at the discretion of the governing body, a request for a technical 
assistance grant. 

(b) All requests for a technical assistance grant shall include a detailed description of 
how the grant will be used and shall be submitted with the formal proposal as 
described in subsection (a). The grants shall be used to implement the 
requirements of this chapter, which shall include but not be limited to, 
professional staffing assistance, local government reorganization, and consulting 
services. The amount of any single grant awarded from the fund, shall not 
exceed $150,000. The board shall review and determine ehgibility of the 
proposals and approve requests within 60 days of receipt of the proposals. ..." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 4 states that "[w]ithin 120 days of the acceptance of this chapter 
the governing body shall implement the following: (a) appoint a single point of contact to serve as 
the primary municipal liaison for all issues relating to this chapter; (b) amend rules and 
regulations on permit issuance to conform to this chapter; (c) along with the issuing authority, 
collect and ensure the availability of all governing statutes, local ... by-laws, regulations, 
procedures and protocols pertaining to each permit; (d) establish a procedure whereby the 
governing body shall determine all permits, reviews and predevelopment reviews required for a 
project; all required scoping sessions, public comment periods and public hearings; and all 
additional specific applications and supplemental information required for review, including, 
where applicable, the identification of potential conflicts of jurisdiction or substantive standards 
with abutting municipalities and a procedure for notifying the applicant; and (e) establish a 
procedure, following the notification of the required submissions for review as set forth in clause 
(d), for determining if all the materials required for the review of the project have been 
completed." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 5 states that "(a) [p]riority development permit reviews and final 
decisions shall be completed within 180 days subject to the extension herein. The time period 
shall begin the day after the issuance of the notice that the application materials are complete 
pursuant to clause (e) of Section 4. The governing body shall notify the applicant in writing 
within 20 business days from receipt of the completed form of additional information needed or 
requirements that it may have. The governing body may provide for pre-application conferences 
to facihtate this process. 

(b) The resubmission of the application or the submission of such additional 
information required by the governing body shall commence a new 30-day period 
for review of the additional information. 

(c) If, at any time, an issuing authority determines that a permit or other 
predevelopment review is required which it did not previously identify, it shall 
immediately notify the applicant by certified mail and shall where public notice 
and comment or hearings are not reqviired complete action on the application 
filed for the previously unidentified permit within 30 days of receipt of the 
completed application or not later than the latest required decision date for a 
pending permit, whichever is later. Where public notice and comment or hearing 
are required for the previously unidentified permit, the required action date shall 
be not later than 30 days from the later of the 



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close of the hearing or comment period, which shall be scheduled to commence as 
quickly as publication allows. The failure of the governing body to notify an 
applicant of the requirement of a public hearing or comment period shall not 
constitute a waiver of the requirement." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D. Section 6 states that "(a) [i]n accordance with this chapter, the governing 
body may establish an informal procedure to allow permit applicants to obtain advisory review 
by a technical review team of any issue of law, pohcy, procedure, or classification that the 
applicant claims is in dispute between the applicant and the issuing authority which has affected 
or will affect the ability of the applicant to obtain timely review of the permit application. The 
procedures shall provide for filing a request for review by the applicant, representation by the 
issuing authority on the technical review team, and a period not to exceed 30 days for issuance of 
a decision. Use of this procedure shall toll the review time periods. An advisory determination 
or ruling made pursuant to a procedure established in this section shall not constitute a decision 
or final action and shall not be subject to any right of administrative or judicial review. 

(b) The governing body may estabUsh an additional and separate fee, in addition to 
any fees that may be assessed by an issuing authority in order to carry out its 
duties under this chapter, and may deposit the fees in a special account to be 
maintained by the treasurer. The special account, including any accrued interest 
shall be expended at the direction of the governing body, without further 
appropriation; but, the funds shall be expended only in carrying out its 
responsibilities under this chapter." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 7 states that "[f]ailure by any issuing authority to take final action 
on a permit or approval within the 180-day period or extended time, if applicable, shall be 
considered a grant of the rehef requested of that authority. ..." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 8 states that "[t]he grant shall not occur where: (1) the governing 
body has made a timely determination that the application is not complete in accordance with its 
requirements and notified the applicant as set forth herein and the applicant has not made a 
timely response to complete the application; (2) the governing body has determined that the final 
application contained false or misleading information; or (3) the governing body has determined 
that substantial changes to the project affect the information required to process the permit 
appUcation have occurred since the filing of the application." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 9 states that "[t]he 180 day time period may be waived or extended 
for good cause upon written request of the applicant with the consent of the governing body or 
upon written request of the issuing authority with the consent of the applicant. The 180-day 
period may be extended for up to 30 days by the governing body in the event an additional 
permit or other predevelopment review is required in accordance with subsection (c) of Section 5, 
if the requirement for the previously unidentified permit or review has been determined no less 
than 150 days after the issuance of the notice of completeness. The 180 day time period shall be 
extended when the issuing authority determines either: (1) that action by another federal, state 
or municipal government agency is required before the issuing authority may act; (2) that 
judicial proceedings affect the ability of the issuing authority or applicant to proceed with the 
application; or (3) that enforcement proceedings that could result in revocation of an existing 
permit for that facility or activity and denial of the application have been commenced. In those 
circumstances, the issuing authority shall provide written notification to the secretary. When 
the reason for the extension is no longer applicable, the issuing authority shall immediately 
notify the applicant, and shall complete its decision within the time period specified in this 
section, beginning the day after the notice is issued. An issuing authority may not use lack of 
time for review as a basis for denial of a permit if the applicant has provided a complete 
application and met all other obligations in accordance with this chapter. ..." 



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M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 10 states that "(a) [a]ppeals from issuing authority decisions or 
from a grant by operation of law shall be filed within 20 days after the last individual permitting 
decision has been rendered or within 20 days after the conclusion of the 180 day period as set 
forth in subsection (a) of Section 5, whichever is later. The 180 day period shall be increased by 
the number of days in any extension granted under this chapter. 

(b) A person aggrieved by a final decision of any issuing authority, or by the failure 
of that authority to take final action concerning the application within the time 
specified, whether or not previously a party to the proceeding, or any 
governmental officer, board, or agency, may appeal to the division of 
administrative law appeals by bringing an action within 20 days after a written 
decision was or should have been rendered. Appeals from decisions of multiple 
permitting authorities shall be filed simultaneously and shall be consolidated for 
purposes of hearing and decision. This section shall not apply to appeals 
pursuant to Sections 40 and 40A of Chapter 131, which shall continue to be 
appealed in accordance with said Chapter 131, Chapter 30A and applicable 
regulations. 

(c) When hearing appeals under this chapter, the division shall revise its rules, 
procedures and regulations to the extent necessary to accord with the 
requirements of this chapter. 

(d) The division shall render a final written decision within 90 days of the receipt of 
the appeal. Thereafter, an aggrieved party may appeal to the superior court 
department by bringing an action within 20 days after the division has rendered 
a final decision." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 11 states that "a) [p]ermits shall not transfer automatically to 
successors in title, unless the permit expressly allows the transfer without the approval of the 
issuing authority. 

(b) Issuing authorities having substantive jurisdiction over permit issuance may 
develop procedures for simplified permit renewals and annual reporting 
requirements. If the procedures are not developed, renewals of permits shaU be 
governed by the same procedures and timelines as specified in conjunction with 
this chapter. 

(c) Issuing authorities shall make reasonable effort to review permit modification 
requests within as short a period as is feasible to maintain the integrity of the 
expedited permitting process. An issuing authority shall inform an applicant 
within 20 business days of receipt of a request whether the modification is 
approved, denied, determined to be substantial or additional information is 
required by the issuing authority in order to issue a decision. If additional 
information is required, the issuing authority shall inform an applicant within 20 
business days after receipt of the required additional information whether the 
modification is approved or denied or that additional information is still required 
by the issuing authority in order to render a decision. In cases in which the 
issuing authority determines that a requested modification is substantial, the 
original review period for permit categories as set forth in Section 5 shall apply. 

(d) Permits issued pursuant to this chapter shall expire 5 years from the date of the 
expiration of the applicable appeal period unless exercised sooner. Where 
permits cover multiple buildings, commencement and continuation of 
construction of 1 building shall preserve the permit validity. Changes in the law 
subsequent to the issuance of permits based upon the priority proposal shall not 
invalidate the permits or review certificates. Nothing in this section shall limit 
the effectiveness of Section 6 of Chapter 40A." 



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M.G L. Chapter 43D. Section 12 states that "[a] priority development site shall be eligible for the 
foUowing:-- 

(a) priority consideration for community development action grants, and public 
works economic development grants; 

(b) priority consideration for other state resources such as quasi-public financing and 
training programs; 

(c) brownfields remediation assistance; 

(d) enhanced marketing by the Massachusetts office of business development, and 
the Massachusetts alliance for economic development; and 

(e) technical assistance provided by the regional planning council." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 13 states that "(a) [t]echnical assistance funding is intended to be a 
one-time grant to municipality, if the municipality has adopted expedited permitting as provided 
in Sections 3 to 11, inclusive. 

(b) A municipality shall be eligible for technical assistance funding, which may be 

less than the previous amounts awarded, for a second time if it has identified and 
successfully permitted one priority development site." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 14 states that "[a]ny required reviews established under Sections 
61 to 62H, inclusive, of Chapter 30 or Sections 26 to 27C, inclusive, of Chapter 9 shall conclude 
within 120 days of a state determination of completeness of required review materials, as 
established by the executive office of environmental affairs in consultation with the state 
secretary. ..." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 15 states that "[njothing in this chapter shall be construed to alter 
the substantive jurisdictional authority of issuing authorities." 

M.G.L. Chapter 43D, Section 16 states that "[t]he secretary shall promulgate rules and 
regulations to implement this chapter." 

And to see if the Town will designate the following parcel of land as a "Priority Development Site" in the 
Town of Wilmington for expedited municipal permitting within the meaning of G.L. Chapter 43D, and 
approve the filing of an application with the Interagency Permitting Board for designation of such parcel 
as a Priority Development Site or to take any other action in relation thereto: land on the west side of 
Interstate Route 93 identified as Assessors Map R-2, Parcel 16 comprising a total of 23 acres. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 
Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Michael Sorrentino, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted 70 in favor 48 opposed, motion passes by two-thirds vote. 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn #21) To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court and to request its 
representatives in the General Court to seek enactment of special legislation for the Town in the form 
set forth below, it being the intent of the Town to authorize the General Court to make constructive 
changes to the text hereof, subject to the approval of the Wilmington Board of Selectmen, to accomplish 
the public poUcy purposes hereof, or to take any other action related thereto: 

AN ACT AMENDING THE WILMINGTON SEWER ACT 

SECTION 1 . Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 ("An Act authorizing the Town of Wilmington to 

Construct and Operate a System of Sewers") as amended by Chapter 346 of the Acts of 
1993 with regard to Section 6 thereof, is hereby further amended as follows: 

The first sentence of Section 1 of Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended is further 
amended as follows: 



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After the words "for a part or whole of its territory", insert the words "as may be from 
time to time defined and estabUshed by adoption by town meeting of one or more by-laws 
as a designated Sewer District under the jurisdiction and control of the Wilmington 
Water and Sewer Commission defined in Section 3 of Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958, 
with such capacity limitations, connections, pumping stations, treatment plants and 
other works, as may be allocated in such by-law to such Sewer Districts in Wilmington as 
required for a system or systems of sewage treatment and disposal". 

At the end of Section 1 of Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended insert the 
following additional sentence: "No other sewers shall be constructed in any public roads 
or ways of the Town of Wilmington which are not within the limits of such designated 
Sewer Districts and which are not under the control of the Wilmington Water and Sewer 
Commission." 

SECTION 2. Section 7, Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended, is hereby further amended as 
follows: 

delete the words "not exceeding in the aggregate five hundred thousand dollars" and the 
words "Wilmington Sewerage Loan, Act of 1958". 

SECTION 3. Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended is hereby further amended by inserting a 
new paragraph 8A stating as follows: 

"Section 8A. There is hereby established two separate special accounts within the 
treasury of the Town of Wilmington as follows: 

(a) an Application Review Fund. Into the Application Review fund shall be 
deposited without dollar limitation all proceeds paid by applicants to the 
Wilmington Water and Sewer Commission for applications for sewer connections, 
in such amounts as may be established from time to time by said Commission 
with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which funds may be spent by the 
Water & Sewer Commission without further appropriation for the purpose of 
paying for the review of permit applications to the Commission. 

(b) a Water Resources Mitigation Fund. Into the Water Resources Mitigation Fund 
shall be deposited without dollar limitation all proceeds paid to the Wilmington 
Water and Sewer Commission by applicants for Water Resources Mitigation 
Charges and Connection Fees as may be established from time to time by said 
Commission with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which funds may be 
spent by the Water & Sewer Commission without further appropriation for the 
purpose of continuing efforts to improve water conservation and reduce leakage 
for the town's drinking water system. Funds may also be used to design and 
construct storm water 

projects that will improve the quality and quantity of surface waters in 
Wilmington by treating and recharging storm water from existing impervious 
surfaces that is now discharged to said waters with inadequate treatment or 
recharge, or to perform Inflow/Infiltration reduction work on the Town sewer 
system." 

SECTION 4. Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended is hereby further amended by inserting a 
new section numbered Section 8B, as follows: 

"Section 8B: Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, owners of land not 
within the Sewer Districts defined and established pursuant to Section 1 of this Act shall 
not be permitted to connect to the town's sewer system except as is set forth in this Act. 
The territory covered by said Sewer Districts may be amended from time to time by the 
board having charge of sewers, after a public hearing conducted to consider such 
amendment, upon approval of the department of environmental protection if otherwise 
required by law and upon enactment by Town Meeting of a by-law defining or 
establishing a new or expanded Sewer District. In the event that the Board having 
charge of sewers votes not to amend the territory of any Sewer District in accordance 



-147- 



with the foregoing sentence, the amendment may nevertheless be enacted in a form of a 
by-law upon a two-third vote of town meeting." 

SECTION 5. Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended is hereby further amended by inserting a 
new section numbered Section 8C as follows: 

"Section SC. Any by-law adopted pursuant to the authority granted to the Town of 
Wilmington by this Act may include authorization to the Wilmington Water and Sewer 
Commission without a Town Meeting vote to add to the Sewer Districts created pursuant 
to this Act properties located within "needs areas" as defined by Wilmington's 
Supplemental Final Comprehensive Water Resource Management Plan / Environmental 
Impact Report - Commonwealth of Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental 
Affairs: File Number 8844 (CWRMP), or any equivalent successor revision or 
amendment thereto as may be approved by said Commission." 

SECTION 6. Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended is hereby further amended by inserting a 
new section numbered Section 8D as follows 

"Section 8D. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained herein, the board 
having charge of the maintenance and repair of sewers may at any time permit 
extensions, new connections or increases in flow to the sewer system, subject to capacity, 
to serve municipal buildings or public restrooms without thereby creating any 
entitlement on the part of any person to connect to such sewer system, and subject to 
capacity, in order of application, may permit or if in the public interest, may require, 
extensions, new connections or new flow to the sewer system within such districts." 

SECTION 7. Section 9, Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 as amended is hereby amended by adding the 
following words as part of and at the end of the first sentence prior to the period 
punctuation mark: 

"provided however, any such action of the town shall only take place in accordance with 
Sections 1, 8B, 8C and 8D of this Act as amended" 

SECTION 8. This Act shall take effect on the first day of July following passage. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article as did the Water and Sewer Commission. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Joseph J. Balliro, Jr., and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted UNANIMOUSLY to approve the Home Rule special act and to send to the Legislature. 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn #27) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and the associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by establishing a Highway Industrial District (HI) comprised of 
the following parcels identified in the Assessors records as follows: 



Concord Street: Map 85 Parcel lA; Map 91 Parcels 119, 119A and 122 

Fordham Road: Map 91 Parcels 121, 131, 132; Map 99 Parcels 1, 132, 134, 135, 141, 142, 143, and 

143A; 

Map R2 Parcels 7, 18, 20A, 20C, 20D, 20E, 20F, 20G, 21, 23B, 23C, 23D, 23E, 
23F, 230, 24, 25, 26A, 26B, 26C, 27A, 28; R3 Parcels 25, 25A, 26, 26A, 28, 29, 
29A, 29B, 29C, 39, 44 and 44A; 

Map R3 Parcels 30, 401, 402, 403, 404 and 404R; 

Map R2 Parcels 10, 14, 16, 17, 17A and 23A; Map R2 Part of Parcels 6, 11, 13, 15 
and 29 

and taking the following actions: 



Ballardvale Street: 

Research Drive: 
Landlocked: 



1. Section 2 Establishment of Districts, Industrial Districts following General Industrial 
(GI), insert Highway Industrial (HI). 

2. Delete Table 1 Principal Use Regulations in its entirety and replace with the following: 



-148- 



TABLE 1 PRINCIPAL USE REGULATIONS 



PRINCIPAL USES 



3.2 



3.3 



3.4 



3.6 



3.6 



RESIDENTIAL 
DISTRICTS 



BUSINESS 
DISTRICTS 



INDUSTRIAL 
DISTRICTS 



SITE 
PLAN 
REVIEW 



3.7 



2 


EXTENSIVE USES 


R-10 


R-20 


R-60 055H 


NB 


GB 


CB 


GI 


HI LI/0 








3.2.1 Agriculture 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


NR 


* 




3.2.2 Greenhouse 


No 


SP 


SP 


SP 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 




3.2.3 Conservation 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


NR 


* 




3.2.4 Recreation 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 




3.2.5 Earth Removal 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


NR 


* 


3 


RESIDENTIAL USES 

3.3.1 Single Family Dwelhng 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


NR 


* 




3.3.2 Accessory Apartments 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


N 


* 




3.3.3 Community Housing Facility 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


No 


No 


No 


NR 


* 




3.3.4 Municipal Bxiilding Reuse 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


No 


No 


No 


NR 


• 




3.3.5 Multi-Family Housing 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 




3.3.6 Over 55 Housing 


No 


No 


No SP 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 


4 GOVERNMENTAL, INSTITUTIONAL AND PUBLIC SERVICE USES 




3.4.1 Municipal Use 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


NR 






3.4.2 Educational 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


NR 


* 




3.4.3 Religious 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


NR 


* 




3.4.4 Philanthropic 


SP 


SP 


SP 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 




3.4.5 Nursery School 


SP 


SP 


SP 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 




3.4.6 Hospital and Nursing Home 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 




3.4.7 PubUc Service Utility 


SP 


SP 


SP 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 




3.4.8 Wireless Communications 
Facility** 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


No 


SP 


SP 


SP 


R 


* 




BUSINESS USES 


























3.5.1.1 Retail Store under 30,000 s.£ 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


SP 


SP 


SP 


R 


* 




3.5.1.2 Retail Store over 30,000 s.f. 
3.5.2 Business and Professional 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


No 


R 


* 




Office 
3.5.3 Bank 


No 
No 


No 
No 


No 
No 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


R 
R 


* 

* 




3.5.4 Limited Service Restaurant 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


Yes 


SP 


Yes 


SP 


R 


* 




3.5.5 General Service Restaurant 

3.5.6 Hotel or Motel 

3.5.7 Lodge and Club 


No 
No 
No 


No 
No 
No 


No 
No 
No 


No 
No 
SP 


SP 
SP 

Yes 


SP 
SP 

Yes 


No 
SP 

Yes 


Yes 
SP 
Yes 


SP 
SP 

Yes 


R 
R 
R 


* 
* 




* 




3.5.8 Funeral Home 


No 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 




3.5.9 Veterinary Care 


No 


No 


N 


No 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


SP 


R 


* 




3.5.10 Personal Service Shop 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 




3.5.11 Craft Shop and Building Trade No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R* 






3.5.12 Commercial and Trade School 

3.5.13 Amusement Facility 

3.5.14 Auto Service Station and 


No 
No 


No 
No 


No 
No 


SP 
No 


Yes 
Yes 


SP 
SP 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


Yes 
Yes 


R* 

R 


* 




Car Wash 
3.5.15 Auto Repair and Body Shop 


No 
No 


No 
No 


No 
No 


No 
No 


SP 
SP 


No 
No 


No 
SP 


No 
SP 


No 
No 


R 
R 


* 

* 




3.5.16 Vehicular Dealership 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


No 


No 


No 


No 


R 


* 




3.5.17 Parking Facility 

3.5.18 Adult Uses*** 

INDUSTRIAL USES 

3.6.1 Warehouse 

3.6.2 Bulk Material Storage and 

Sales 


No 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 


6 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 




No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


No 


R 


* 




3.6.3 Heavy Vehicular Dealership 
and Repair Garage 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


SP 


No 


R 


* 




3.6.4 Light Industrial 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


R 


* 




3.6.5 Limited Manufacturing 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


SP 


SP 


R 


* 




3.6.6 General Manufecturing 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


SP 


SP 


No 


R 








7 


PROHIBITED USES 
3.7.1 Prohibited Uses 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


No 


NR 


* 



** 
*** 



Uses within the Ground Water Protection Districts may be subject to additional regulation. See Section 6.6 Ground Water 
Protection Districts. 

Monopoles allowed by SP on Town-owned land; and attachments allowed by SP on existing structures in all zoning districts. 
Overlay district. See Section 6.7 



-149- 



3. Amend TABLE II STANDARD DIMENSIONAL REGULATIONS by adding the following 
after General Industrial: 



HIGHWAY INDUSTRIAL 80,000 s.f. as minimum lot area; all other dimensions the same as 

General Industrial. 

4. Amend Section 3.5 Classification of Business Uses by deleting 3.5.1 and adding the 
following: 

3.5.1.1 Retail Store(s) under 30,000 s.f. - Store(s) for the display and sale of 
merchandise within a building having single or multi-tenants, no one tenant 
having more than 30,000 s.f. Defined as including but not limited to: 
grocery, deli, sandwich shop, ice cream parlor, bakery and package stores; 
drugstore; book, stationery and gift shop; antique shop; florist; pet shop; 
television and radio sales; hardware store; department and furniture stores; 
garden center with open air sales; and all other retail stores. 

A sandwich shop shall be defined as a food establishment serving sandwiches 
of all types and varieties, soups, salads, pizza and all other individually 
portioned items, with said foods to be consumed off the premises. 

3.5.1.2 Retail Store(s) over 30,000 s.f - Store(s) for the display and sale of 
merchandise primarily within a building primarily for a single tenant. 
Defined as including but not hmited to: home improvement, department or 
furniture stores; garden centers with open air sales. 

5. Amend Section 3.8.9 by adding the words "under 30,000 s.f." following "Retail uses." 

6. Amend existing Section 3.8.10 by renumbering it as 3.8.11 and adding a new 3.8.10 as 
follows: 

3.8.10 Retail uses over 30,000 s.f in the Highway Industrial district shall be subject 
to the following minimum special permit criteria. 

o Minimum lot size 80,000 s.f 

o At least 40% of the fifty foot front yard setback as defined by this by-law, 
shall be landscaped with native species and drought resistant plant 
materials and shall be required to have one tree for every twenty-five feet 
of frontage. At the time of planting each tree shall have a trunk width of 
at least three inches measured at a point six inches above grade. The 
spacing of the trees shall be at the discretion of the developer but shall 
not be of a manner that reduces visibility at points of access or egress 
from the site. Further, the required landscaped area shall contain an 
arrangement of plantings, shrubbery or evergreen material that within 
two years of planting shall attain a height of at lease thirty-six inches. 
The line of plant materials shall be located at least ten feet from the 
street line but not necessarily in a straight row. Further, they shall not 
be placed and maintained so as to impede safe access to or egress from 
the site. All other surface areas of the landscaped portion of the front 
yard setback shall be planted with a ground cover, grass or mulching, 
where appropriate. 

o Interior landscaping within parking areas shall represent 15% of the 

total area to attempt to eliminate excessive heat from the parking lot and 
to provide shaded parking spaces. 

o All lighting for parking or building illumination shall be directed onto the 
lot at all times; a lighting plan to this effect shall be prepared for review 
by the special permit granting authority. 



-150- 



7. Amend Section 6.4.1.1 by adding in e. following "Retail" the words "under 30,000 s.f."; 
relettering existing f., g., h., i. and j. to g., h., i., j. and k. and adding a new 6.4. 1.1. f as 
follows: 

f. Retail over 30,000 s.f. 1 space per 400 s.f. of gross floor area 

8. Amend Section 6.8. 3.b by deleting the words "Industrial Park (IP)" and adding "Highway 
Industrial (HI)." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 
Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Sorrentino, and seconded by Mr. Caira, the Town of Wilmington 
voted 60 in favor 21 opposed, motion passes by two-thirds. 

MOTION OF RECONSIDERATION: Defeated. 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn #20) To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3 of the Zoning By-law by 
adding the following new subsection 3.9, Inclusionary Housing, as follows: 

3.9 Inclusionary Housing 

3.9.1 Purposes and Intent -- The purposes of the Inclusionary Housing Bylaw are to 
provide housing units affordable for low- or moderate-income households; 
encourage more housing choices in the Town of Wilmington; promote geographic 
distribution of affordable housing units throughout the Town and avoid over- 
concentration; and assist the Town in creating units eligible for the Chapter 40B 
Subsidized Housing Inventory through means other than a comprehensive 
permit. 

3.9.2 Applicability - This section shall apply to any development with twelve (12) or 
more residential lots or twelve (12) or more residential dwelling units in any 
zoning district within the Town. Developments shall not be segmented to avoid 
compliance with this section. Divisions of land that would cumulatively result in 
an increase by twelve (12) or more residential lots or dwelling units above the 
number existing on any parcel or any contiguous parcels in common ownership 
twenty-four months earlier are subject to the Inclusionary Housing requirements 
set forth hereunder. 

3.9.3 Definitions -- For purposes of this section, the following terms shall have the 
following meanings: 

3.9.3.1 Affordable Housing (or Affordable Unit) - A dwelling unit that is 
affordable to and occupied by a low- or moderate-income household and 
meets the requirements of the Massachusetts Department of Housing 
and Community Development ("DHCD") or any successor agency for 
inclusion on the Chapter 40B Subsidized Housing Inventory. 

3.9.3.2 Affordable Housing Restriction - A contract, mortgage agreement, deed 
restriction, or other legal instrument, acceptable in form and substance to 
the Town of Wilmington, that effectively restricts occupancy of an 
affordable housing unit to a qualified purchaser or qualified renter, and 
which provides for administration, monitoring and enforcement of the 
restriction during the term of affordability. An affordable housing 
restriction shall run with the land in perpetuity or for the maximum 
period of time allowed by law, so as to be binding on and enforceable 
against any person claiming an interest in the property. An affordable 
housing restriction shall be enforceable under the provisions of G.L. 
C.184, § 31-33, as amended, and shall be approved by DHCD. 



-151- 



3.9.3.3 Affordable Housing Fund -- A fund account established and operated by 
the Town for the purpose of creating or preserving affordable housing 
opportunities in the Town of Wilmington. 

3.9.3.4 Local Initiative Program -- A program administered by DHCD for local 
affordable housing initiatives that do not require a comprehensive 
permit. 

3.9.3.5 Low- or Moderate-Income Household -- A household with income at or 
below 80% of area median income, adjusted for household size, that 
applies to the Town of Wilmington as determined by the U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). 

3.9.3.6 Maximum Affordable Purchase Price or Rent -- A selling price or monthly 
rent that does not exceed the maximum allowable purchase price or rent 
guidehnes of DHCD. 

3.9.3.7 Qualified Purchaser -- A low- or moderate-income household that 
purchases and occupies an affordable housing unit as its principal 
residence. 

3.9.3.8 Qualified Renter - A low- or moderate-income household that rents and 
occupies an affordable housing unit as a tenant. 

3.9.3.9 Subsidized Housing Inventory - The DHCD Chapter 40B Subsidized 
Housing Inventory. 

3.9.4 Special Permit Required - No building permits shall be issued for a development 
subject to this section except in accordance with a special permit granted by the 
Planning Board. 

3.9.5 Mandatory Provision of Affordable Housing Units 

3.9.5.1 In any development subject to this section, at least ten percent of the 
dwelling units shall be affordable housing. In the instance of a fraction, 
the fraction shall be rounded to the nearest whole number. 

3.9.5.2 The affordable housing units shall be in addition to the number of units 
allowed as of right in the applicable zoning district, in full conformance 
with all zoning, subdivision regulations, health regulations, wetlands 
regulations and other applicable requirements. The proponent shall have 
the burden of proof with regard to the design and engineering 
specifications for such as-of-right development. 

3.9.5.3 To accommodate the affordable housing as additional units in the 
development, the Planning Board may, in granting a special permit, 
authorize a reduction in the minimum lot area, minimum lot frontage 
and/or minimum lot width that would normally apply, as determined in 
accordance with Section 5 and Table II of this bylaw, provided that: 

a. No lot shall contain less than sixty percent (60%) of the minimum 
lot area nor less than eighty percent (80%) of the minimum lot 
frontage set forth in Table II; and 

b. Any lot abutting an existing single-family dwelling and any lot 
with frontage on an existing public way shall conform in all 
respects with the dimensional regulations in Table II. 

3.9.5.4 For multi-family residential uses, the affordable units shall be in addition 
to the number of units allowed under the maximum density regulations 
for multi-family uses in the applicable zoning district. The Planning 
Board may, in granting a special permit, authorize an increase in the 
maximum number of dwelling units per square feet of lot area only to the 
extent necessary to accommodate the affordable units in the 
development. 



-152- 



3.9.5.5 Except as provided in Section 3.9.6 below, the affordable units shall be 
constructed on the same parcel or tract of land as the proposed 
development and shall be integrated within the development ("on-site 
units"). 

3.9.5.6 Nothing in this section shall preclude a proponent from providing more 
affordable units than the minimum number of affordable units required 
herein. 

3.9.6 Alternative Methods of Providing Affordable Housing Units - The Planning 
Board may approve, in addition to or in heu of on-site affordable units, any of the 
following methods for the provision of affordable housing: 

3.9.6.1 The affordable housing units may be constructed or rehabihtated on a 
site different from that of the proposed development. The Planning 
Board may allow the proponent to develop, construct or otherwise provide 
affordable units reasonably equivalent to those required by this section in 
another location within the Town of Wilmington. The requirements that 
apply to on-site affordable units shall also apply to off-site affordable 
units. The location of the off-site units shall be approved by the Planning 
Board as an integral element of the development review and approval 
process. 

3.9.6.2 In any development that is required to provide two or more affordable 
housing units under Section 3.9.5 above, the Planning Board may allow 
the proponent to make a cash payment to the Town through its 
Affordable Housing Fund for up to one-half of the required number of 
affordable units. The cash payment per unit shall be in accordance with 
the following formula: two times an amount equal to eighty percent (80%) 
of the area median income that apphes to the Town of Wilmington, as 
determined by HUD. 

3.9.7 General Provisions 

3.9.7.1 The Planning Board shall be charged with administering this section and 
shall promulgate rules and regulations, including but not limited to 
submission requirements and procedures, application and review fees, 
minimum requirements for a marketing plan, and documentation 
required by the Town or DHCD to meet requirements for inclusion in the 
Chapter 40B Subsidized Housing Inventory. 

3.9.7.2 Affordable units shall be dispersed throughout the lots or building(s) in a 
development and shall be comparable to the proposed market-rate units 
in terms of location, construction quality, number of bedrooms and 
external appearance. 

3.9.7.3 The selection of qualified purchasers or qualified renters shall be carried 
out under a marketing plan approved by the Planning Director. The 
marketing plan shall describe how the applicant will accommodate the 
Town of Wilmington's local preference policy, if any. 

3.9.7.4 Prior to the issuance of any building permits for the development, the 
proponent shall be responsible for providing the Planning Department 
with all information required by DHCD in order for the affordable units 
to be included on the Chapter 40B Subsidized Housing Inventory. 

3.9.8 Timing of Construction 

3.9.8.1 Unless a different schedule is approved by the Planning Board as a 

condition of the special permit, no building permits shall be issued for 
market-rate units in the development except in proportion to the number 
of affordable units, and affordable units shall not be the last units 
constructed in the development. For example, in a development of 



-153- 



sixteen units, two of which must be affordable, a building permit shall be 
issued for the first affordable unit before a building permit can be issued 
for the eighth market-rate unit, and a building permit shall be issued for 
the second affordable unit before a building permit can be issued for the 
last market-rate unit. 

3.9.8.2 No Certificate of Occupancy for an affordable unit shall be issued until 
the proponent submits documentation to the Building Inspector that an 
affordable housing restriction has been approved by the Planning Board 
and DHCD. 

3.9.9 Preservation of Affordability; Restrictions on Resale 

3.9.9.1 Each affordable housing unit created under this section shall be subject 
to an affordable housing restriction as defined in Section 3.9.3, recorded 
with the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, containing limitations on 
use, resale and rents. The affordable housing restriction shall meet the 
requirements of the Town and DHCD, and shall be in force for the 
maximum period allowed by law. 

3.9.9.2 All documents necessary to ensure compliance with this section shall be 
subject to review and approval by the Planning Board and, where 
applicable. Town Counsel. Such documents shall be executed prior to and 
as a condition of the issuance of any Certificate of Occupancy. 

3.9.10 Severability -- If any portion of this section is declared invalid, the remainder 
shall continue to be in full force and effect. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: The Town of Wilmington voted to passover Article 22. 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn #26) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to request 
the State Legislature to authorize Darryl Sencabaugh be allowed to have his test results for the 
Massachusetts Fire Fighters Civil Service Exam (April 2008) be allowed for any employment 
consideration as a fire fighter in the Town of Wilmington. Notwithstanding the provisions of the general 
laws, rules or regulations to the contrary regulating age of applicants for appointment as a fire fighter in 
the said town and provided he meets all other requirements, he shall be eligible for certification and 
appointment to the Fire Department of Wilmington subject to the appointment of the appointing 
authority; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Daryl Sencabaugh, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted UNANIMOUSLY to approve Article 23. 

ARTICLE 24. (drawn #18) To see if the Town will pass an article to give Tax Relief to seniors sixty-five 
(65; and older to receive a five percent (5%) reduction on tax bills. Also to be included is a five percent 
(5%) increase every five (5) year period (i.e.: 65 = 5%; 70 = 10%; 75 = 15% etc). Requirements: Five years 
Wilmington residency and home ownership; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this Article. 

AMENDMENT: To move that the Town of Wilmington vote to request Tax Relief for seniors 
sixty-five (65) and older to receive a five percent (5%) reduction on tax bills. Also, to be included 
is a five percent (5%) increase every five (5) year period (i.e.: 65=5%, 7-=10%, 75=15%). 
Requirements: Five years Wilmington residency and home ownership and further that this 
article (if approved) be sent to the Wilmington State Legislative Delegation for their 
consideration. 



-154- 



AMENDED MOTION: On motion of Mr. Michael Bodner, and duly seconded, the Town of 
Wilmington voted in the affirmative to amend Article 24. 

MAIN MOTION: On motion of Mr. Michael Bodner, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington 
voted in the affirmative to approve Article 24 as amended. (2 opposed) 

ARTICLE 25. (drawn #24) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from General Business (GB) to Central 
Business (CB) the following parcel of land. The land is located at and known as 362 Middlesex Avenue, 
Wilmington, MA 01887 as more fully described in deed recorded in Middlesex North District registry of 
Deeds, Book 5712, Page 99, Lot 6A, said premises containing 94,960.8 square feet of land. 362 
Middlesex Avenue is located on the Town Assessor's Map 89, Parcel 6A; or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. This Article will allow for mixed use 
development on this lot. 

Many residents spoke in opposition of this article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. John Forrest, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 47 
in favor 50 opposed to approve Article 25. Motion fails. 

MOTION OF RECONSIDERATION: Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 26. (drawn #25) To see if the Town wiU vote to authorize the Selectmen to enter into an 
agreement, the terms of which shall be as determined by the Selectmen, to sell, convey or otherwise 
dispose of, all or part of the following described parcels, following a determination made by the Town 
Manager that the land is not needed for any municipal purpose, and in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised, and other applicable 
law. The parcel located on Nickerson Avenue, described in the Assessor's records as Map 72, Parcel 23; 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 

Planning Board recommended approval of this Article with a restriction stating no development can 
occur on this portion of the lot. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Hanson, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to approve Article 26. 

ARTICLE 27. (drawn #19) To see if the Town of Wilmington will vote to authorize transfer of the care, 
custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereafter 
described to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer 
needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance 
with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectman be and hereby 
authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of Wilmington and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectman in accordance with Chapter 3, 
Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcel and 
interest is described as Map 6, Parcel 19A; or take any other action related thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article contingent upon determination of surplus. 
Planning Board offered no recommendation. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Doherty, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted to 
Passover Article 27. (Land was not considered surplus by Town Manager) 



-155- 



ARTICLE 28. (.drawn #17) To see if the Town will vote to relinquish, sell and convey a portion of 
certain easement rights held by the Town in a parcel of land identified as Parcel 2N on Assessor's Map 5, 
and being further described hereinafter, for a price to be determined by the Town Assessor. 

Description 

An area, described as "Easement Area to be Abandoned" consisting of 1,537 +/- square feet of land as 
shown on a Plan Entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. Dated May 10, 2007, Hayes Engineering, 
Inc.. Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors" being a portion of an easement for drainage granted to the 
Town of Wilmington by Mark A. Lopez, Trustee of Marcy Realty Trust, which grant of easement is dated 
April 9. 1996 and is recorded with Middlesex North Registry of Deeds at Book 8296, Page 256, and which 
easement is further described as: 

.A parcel of land in Wilmington, Massachusetts describing and conveying drainage easement rights to the 
Town of Wilmington as shown on Definitive Subdivision Plan entitled "Plan of Land, Lots 15-26, Marion 
Street. Wilmington, NL\., H-Star Engineering, Inc.", Dated March 15, 1994 with revisions through July 
8. 1994, which plan is recorded with Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 192, Page 106 and 
which easement area is bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point South 70-ll'-56" East, 83.93 feet from the end of a 210.59 foot curve with a radius 
of 340.00 feet to the left on the southerly side of Marion Street; 



Thence 


running 


South 


26- 


47'- 


06" 


West, 104.48 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


North 


65- 


15' 


■46" 


West, 92.09 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


South 


47- 


22' 


00" 


West, 100.00 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


South 


56- 


02'- 


48" 


East, 164.49 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


North 


47- 


22' 


00" 


East, 100.00 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


North 


39- 


10' 


■12" 


West, 45.08 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


North 


26- 


47" 


■06" 


East, 113.60 feet to a point; 


Thence 


running 


North 


70- 


11' 


■56" 


West, 30.22 feet along Marion Street to the point of beginning; 



or take any other action related thereto. 



Finance Committee recommended approval of this Article. 
Planning Board recommended approval of this Article. 

MOTION: On motion of Mr. Robert Farrell, and duly seconded, the Town of Wilmington voted 
UNANIMOUSLY to approve Article 28. 

The Annual Town Meeting adjourned at 5:38 p.m. A total of 252 registered voters attended the meeting. 



-156- 



TATE PRIMARY SEPTEMBER 16, 2008 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections at the Boutwell School- Precincts 1 and 2; 
Wildwood School- Precincts 3 and 4; and Town Hall- 121 Glen Road Precincts 5 and 6 on Tuesday, the 
sixteenth day of September, 2008 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of the political parties for the following 
officers: 



Senator in Congress 
Representative in Congress 
Councilor 

Senator in General Court 
Representative in General Court 
Register of Probate 
County Commissioners 
County Treasurer 



For the Commonwealth 
Sixth Congressional District 
Fifth Congressional District 

Essex & Middlesex District 
Nineteenth District 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 
Middlesex County 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Senator in Congress 
John F. Kerry 
Edward J. O'Reilly 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



845 
696 


15 



1,556 



Representative in Congress 

John F. Tierney 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



1,165 
14 
377 
1,556 



Councillor 

Mary-Ellen Manning 
Timothy P. Houten 
All Others 
Blanks 
Total 



789 
417 
6 

344 



1,556 



Senator in General Court 

No Nomination 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 





. 241 
1.315 
1,556 



Representative in General Court (19^^) 

James R. Miceli 

All Others 

Blanks 

Total 



1,034 
21 
281 
1,336 



•157- 




Representative in General Court (2P') 



Charles A. Murphy 159 

All Others 1 

Blanks 60 

Total 220 

Register of Probate 

John R. Buonomo 770 

Sean T. O'Donovan 75 

.\11 Others 46 

Blanks 665 

Total 1,556 

REPUBLICAN PARTY 

Senator in Congress 

Jeffrey K. Beatty 245 

.All Others 3 

Blanks 19 

Total 267 

Representative in Congress 

Richard A. Baker 241 

All Others 

Blanks 26 

Total 267 

Councillor 

No Nomination and no votes cast. 
Senator in General Court 

Bruce E. Tarr 244 

All Others 

Blanks 23 

Total 267 



Representative in Congress 19^^ 
No Nomination and no votes cast. 

Representative in Congress 21°^ 
No Nomination and no votes cast. 

Register in Probate 



Sean T. O'Donovan 14 

All Others 47 

Blanks 206 

Total 267 



GREEN-RAINBOW PARTY 

There were no nominations or votes cast in the State Primary. 
WORKING FAMILIES PARTY 

There were no nominations or votes cast in the State Primary. 

All polling places were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. A total of 1,556 registered voters cast 
ballots on September 16, 2008, which represents approximately 10% of 15,378 registered voters. 



-158- 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 4, 2008 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections at the Boutwell School- Precincts 1 and 2; 
Wildwood School- Precincts 3 and 4; and Town Hall- 121 Glen Road Precincts 5 and 6 on Tuesday, 
November 4, 2008 from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of the political parties for the following 
officers: 



Electors of President & Vice President 
Senator in Congress 
Representative in Congress 
Councillor 

Senator in General Court 
Representative General Court 
Representative in General Court 
Registrar of Probate 



Statewide 
Statewide 

6'*" Congressional District 
District 

Essex & Middlesex 
19^^ Middlesex District 
21«' Middlesex - Precinct 3 
Middlesex District 



Electors of President & Vice President 

Baldwin and Castle -- Constitution 

Barr and Root - Libertarian 

McCain and Pahn - Republican 

McKinney and Clemente - Green-Rainbow 

Nader and Gonzalez - Independent 

Obama and Biden - Democrat 

Blanks 

Write in 

Total 



14 
45 
5,923 
17 
125 
5,812 
64 
42 



12,042 



Senator in Congress 

John F. Kerry - Democrat 

Jeffrey K. Beatty - Repubhcan 

Robert J. Underwood -- Libertarian 

Blanks 

Write in 

Total 



6,609 
4,709 
354 
367 

6 



12,042 



Representative in Congress 

John F. Tierney -- Democrat 

Richard A. Baker - Repubhcan 

Blanks 

Write in 

Total 



7,743 
3,708 
874 
17 



12,042 



Councillor 

Mary-Ellen Manning - Democrat 

Blanks 

Write in 

Total 



7,801 
4,110 
131 



12,042 



-159- 



Senator in General Court 

Bruce E. Tarr -- Republican 8,537 

Blanks 3,419 

Write in 86 

Total 12,042 

Representative in General Court (19"') 

James R. Miceli -- Democrat 7,732 

Blanks 2,128 

Write in 114 

Total 9,974 

Representative in General Court (2P') 

Charles A. Murphy -- Democrat 1,347 

Blanks 706 

Write in 15 

Total 2,068 

Registrar in Probate 

Tara DeCristofaro -- Democrat 7,724 

Blanks 4,218 

Write in 100 

Total 12,042 

Questions 

Question One - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law that would reduce the state personal income tax rate to 2.65% for all categories 
of taxable income for the tax year beginning on or after January 1, 2009, and would eliminate the tax for 
all tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2010? 

Yes 3,809 

No 7,791 

Blanks 262 

Write in 

Total 12,042 

Question Two - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law that would replace the criminal penalties for possession of one ounce or less of 
marijuana with a new system of civil penalties, to be enforced by issuing citations and would exclude 
information regarding this civil offense from the state's criminal record information system? 

Yes 7,306 

No 4,519 

Blanks 217 

Write in 

Total 12,042 

Question Three - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law that would prohibit any dog racing or racing meeting in Massachusetts where 
any form of betting or wagering on the speed or ability of dogs occurs? 

Yes 5,938 

No 5,829 

Blanks 275 

Write in 

Total 12,042 



-160- 



Question Four (Precinct 3 only) - This Question is Not Binding 



Shall the state representative of this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow 
seriously ill patients, with their doctor's written recommendation, to posses and grow small amounts of 
marijuana for their personal medical use? 

Yes 1,250 
No 563 
Blanks 255 

Write in 

Total 2,068 

Our three polling districts were opened at 7:00 a.m. and closed at 8:00 p.m. Election Day in Wilmington 
proved to be extremely busy with a very heavy volume in the morning; with a continued steady pace 
throughout the day. The number of ballots cast was 12, 042, which represented 76% of our 15,845 
registered voters. The Town Clerk's office would like to thank all Town Departments; and special 
thanks to Carolyn Kenney, Asst. Town Clerk, Phyllis Vieira, Senior Clerk and all of our terrific poll 
workers. 




Butters Farmhouse on Chestnut Street. 



-161- 




Directory of Officials - January 1, 



Board of Selectmen 



Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
Charles R. Fiore, Jr. 
Louis Cimaglia, IV 
Raymond N. Lepore 
Michael V. McCoy 



2010 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2011 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



2009 



School Committee 



Margaret A. Kane, Chairman 
Steven J. Higgins, Vice Chairman 
Kimberly M. Peterson, Secretary 
Suzanne S. Cushing 
Joan M. Duffy 
Judith L. O'Connell 
Leslee A. Qviick 



2010 
2011 
2009 
2009 
2010 
2010 
2011 



Superintendent of Schools Joanne M. Benton 



Finance Committee 



John F. Doherty, III, Chairman 
Richard K. Hayden, Secretary 
Bernard P. Nally, Jr. 
William J. Wallace 
Victoria L. Ellsworth 
Daniel C. WandeU, Jr. 
Theresa M. Manganelli 
Robert P. Palmer 



2011 
2009 
2009 
2009 
2010 
2010 
2011 
2011 



-162- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions = Jaeeary 1, 2009 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals. Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 2011 

Robert L. Doucette 2009 

Edward P. Loud 2010 

Robert H. Spencer 2012 

Daniel J. Veerman 2013 



Assessors, Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal Assessor 
Anthony E. Krzeminski 

By-Law Study Committee 

Robert H. Spencer, Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Scott C. Garrant 

Walter J. Kaminski 

Joan D. Searfoss 

Selectman Liaison 

Sharon A. George, Ex-Officio 

Cable TV Adyisory Task Force 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 
Donna Gacek 
Neil Ellis 



Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

H. EHzabeth White, Chairperson 2010 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec. Sec. 2009 

Adele C. Passmore, Publicity 2010 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 2011 

Margaret A. St. Onge 2009 

Cemetery Commission 

Cynthia A. McCue, Chairman 2010 

Judith A. Simmons 2009 

Stephen P. Berghaus 20 1 1 

Conservation Commission 

Beyerly A. Shea, Chairman 2011 

Vincent Licciardi, Vice Chairman 2009 

Mario S. Marchese 2009 

Frank J. Ingram 2010 

Donald J. Pearson 2010 

Judith A. Waterhouse 2010 

Thomas Siracusa 2011 



Term 
Expires 



Disabilities. Commission on 

PhyUis P. Genetti, Chairman 2011 

George B. O'Connell 2009 

Frank A. Botte 2010 

Joseph P. Franceschi, Jr. 2010 
Selectman Liaison 

Elderly Services Commission 

David Landers, Chairman 2009 

Albert J. LaValle 2009 

John J. King 2010 

Francis Sferrazza 2010 

Mary Smith 2010 

Rosemary K. Cross 2011 

Carol Hulburt 2011 



Emergency Management Committee 

Michael A. Caira 
Jeffrey M. HuU 
Michael R. Begonis 
Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 
George W. Hooper, II 
Michael Morris 
Shelly M. Newhouse 
Donald N. Onusseit 
John T. Spaulding 
Michael J. Woods 



Health. Board of 

Elizabeth E. Sabounjian, Chairman 2011 

James A. Ficociello, V. Chairman 2010 

Jane A. WiUiams-Vale 2009 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 2008 

William J. Campbell 2009 

Kathleen Black-Reynolds 2009 

Robert R. Butters, Jr. 2010 

Bonny A. Smith 2010 

Gerald R. Duggan 2011 

Julie O'Brien FenneU 201 1 



-163- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2009 



Term 
Expires 



Housing Authority 

Robert C. DiPasquale, Chairman 2013 

Leona C. Bombard 2010 

JohnP. Goggin 2011 

Matthew R. Cox 2012 

Housing Partnership 

Raymond G. Forest, Chairman 2009 

John P. Goggin 2009 

Cynthia A. McCue 2009 
Raymond N. Lepore, Sel. Liason 

Library Trustees 

Karen E. Campbell, Chairman 2009 

Donald J. Pearson, Vice Chairman 2010 

Joan S. Grady 2009 

Susanne L. Clarkin 2010 

James F.Banda 2011 

Eileen L. MacDougall 2011 
Anne Buzzell, Trustee Emeritus 



Master Plan Committee 

Randi R. Holland, Chairman 

Michael A. Sorrentino, Vice Chairman 

Stephen J. Costa 

Rosemary K. Cross 

Robert C. DiPasquale 

Raymond G. Forest 

William F. C. Gately 

Carolyn R. Harris 

Arthur Hayden, Sr. 

Steven J. Higgins 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Sidney R. Kaizer 

Vincent Licciardi 

Kenneth J. Lifton 

Debra L. Russo 

Karl 1. Sagal 

Beverly A. Shea 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Daniel E. Woodbury 

Ann L. Yurek 

Charles R. Fiore, Selectmen Liaison 



Term 
Expires 

Open Space & Recreation 

Judith A. Waterhouse 

Betty M. Bigwood 

Charles Michael Burns 

Francis Dellapelle 

Michael Fay 

Richard H. Grinder, Jr. 

Jeffrey M. Hull 

Mark Kennedy 

Kenneth J. Lifton 

Mark Nasiff 

Beverly A. Shea 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Louis Cimaglia, IV, Selectman Liaison 

Winifred McGowan, Coordinator 



Permanent Building Committee 

George W. Hooper, H, Chairman 2011 

Joseph A. Langone 2009 

Paul J. Melaragni 2009 

Joseph J. Parrella, Jr. 2010 

John C. Holloway 2011 

Planning Board 

Michael A. Sorrentino, Chairman 2012 

Ann L. Yurek, Clerk 2009 

Randi R. Holland 2010 

Brian T. Corrigan 2011 

James F. Banda, Jr. 2013 

Recreation Commission 

C. Michael Burns, Chairman 2011 

Sheila Burke, Vice Chairman 2009 

Maribeth Crupi 2009 

Charles Biondo 2010 

Mark Kennedy 2010 

Redevelopment Authority 

Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 2011 

John Goggin 2009 

Sidney R. Kaizer 2012 

Regional Vocational Technical 
School Committee 

James M. Gillis 2009 

Robert G. Peterson 2010 



-164- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions =■ January 1, 2009 



Term 
Expires 



Registrars. Board of 

Alice M. Hooper, Chairman 2009 

PrisciUa R. Ward 2010 

Edward L. Sousa 2011 
Sharon A. George, Clerk 

Scholarship Fund Committee 

Joanne M. Benton, Chairman 2011 

Rita Boudreau 2011 

John J. DeMarco 2011 

Carol A. King 2011 

Robert G. Peterson 2011 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Michael Morris, Chairman 2009 

Lorraine P. Dineen 2009 

Pamela L. MacKenzie 2009 



Term 
Expires 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 



Joseph J. BaUiro, Jr., Chairman 2010 

Matthew J. Kane 2009 

George R.AUan 2011 

Wilmington Arts Council 

Jane M. Crane, Chairman 2009 

H. Ehzabeth White* 2009 

Barbara Forrestall 2009 

Marguerite Elia 2010 

Linda MoUoy 2010 



* Advisory Board Member 



-165- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions - January 1, 2009 



Wilmington Election Officers - Term Expires Annually 



Precinct 1 

Mary- D'Eon, Warden 

Priscilla R. Ward, Deputy Warden 

Mar>' Schultz, Deputy Clerk 

Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 

Wendy Diecidue, Alternate 

Kim Mytych, Alternate 

Denise Robarge, Alternate 

Precinct 3 

Patricia McKenna, Warden 
Shirley Brush, Inspector 
Loretta R. Caira, Inspector 
Carol King, Inspector 
Janice Quandt, Inspector 
Alma D'Antonio, Alternate 
Susan Delaney, Alternate 
Ruth Holbrook, Alternate 
Taryn Martiniello, Alternate 
Michele Nortonen, Alternate 

Precinct 5 

Nita Beals, Warden 
Maureen Fiorenza, Deputy Warden 
Barbara Forrestall, Inspector 
Jeanne Grant, Inspector 
Cynthia McCue, Inspector 
Judith A. Simmons, Inspector 
Lorraine Chase, Alternate 
Beverly Dalton, Alternate 
Francine Hersom, Alternate 



Precinct 2 

Alfred Antinarelli, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Deputy Warden 
Betty Roberts, Deputy Clerk 
Helen Brady, Inspector 
Andrea Houser, Inspector 
Robert J. Sweet, Inspector 
Susan McNamara, Alternate 
Joyce Murray, Alternate 
Gayle Regan, Alternate 
Audrey E. Riddle, Alternate 

Precinct 4 

Sarah H. Cosman, Warden 
Joan Searfoss, Deputy Warden 
Marilyn West, Deputy Clerk 
Gail Gass, Inspector 
Phyllis Hailey, Inspector 
Florence Webster, Inspector 
Joanna E. Clayton, Alternate 
Linda DeMole, Alternate 
Julia Doten, Alternate 
Lorraine A. Hermann, Alternate 
Mary Lunetta, Alternate 
Deborah Steen, Alternate 

Precinct 6 

Donald Armstrong, Warden 
Jean C. Lefavour, Inspector 
Mary F. Kiesinger, Inspector 
Jean Mazzocca, Inspector 
Lillian Gigliotti, Alternate 
Mary Larffarello, Alternate 
Laurie Mathews, Alternate 
Joanne Roberto, Alternate 
Mary Ann Steen, Alternate 
Margaret White, Alternate 



-166- 



Officers aed Department Heads •= Jaoiiary Ij 2009 



Accountant 

Administrative Assistant 
Animal Control/Inspector 
Assistant Town Manager 
Assessor, Principal 
Constable 

Elderly Services Director 
Emergency Management Director 
Engineering Director 
Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Inspector of Buildings 

Librarian 

Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 

Mass. Water Resource Authority 
Advisory Board 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Middlesex Canal Commission 

Museum Curator 
Planning/Conservation Director 
Plumbing and Gas Inspector 
Pohce Chief 

Public Buildings Superintendent 

Public Health Director 

Public Health Nurse 

Public Works Superintendent 

Reading Municipal Light Dept. 
Advisory Board 

Recreation Director 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Treasurer/Collector 

Veterans' Agent/Grave Officer 

Water & Sewer Superintendent 

Wiring Inspector 



Michael Morris 
Beverly J. Dalton 
Ellen G. Davis Sawyer 
Jeffrey M. Hull 
Humphrey J. Moynihan 
Charles E. Rooney, Jr. 
Theresa Marciello 
Edmund J. Corcoran 
Anthony Pronski 
Edward G. Bradbury 
Theresa Georgopoulos 
John T. Spaulding 
Christina A. Stewart 
Michael V. McCoy 

Michael J. Woods 

Carole S. Hamilton 

Betty M. Bigwood 
Michael J. Mclnnis 

Theresa McDermott 

Carole S. Hamilton 

Paul Raffi 

Michael R. Begonis 

* George W. Hooper, II 
** Shelly M. Newhouse 

Judy Baggs, R.N. 
Donald N. Onusseit 

* George W. Hooper, II 
A. Quincy Vale 

Deborah E. Cipriani 

Charles H. Carroll 

Sharon A. George 

Paul DeRensis 

Michael A. Caira 

Pamela L. MacKenzie 

Loviis CimagUa, IV 

Michael J. Woods 

Frederick Sutter 



694-2029 
658-3311 
658-7845 
658-3311 
658-3675 
658-6140 

657- 7595 

658- 3346 
658-4499 
658-3346 
658-8531 
658-4531 
658-2967 
658-3311 

658-4711 

658-8238 
657-7870 



658-5475 

658-8238 

658-4531 

658-5071 

658-3017 

658-4298 

694-2041 

658-4481 

658-3017 
988-7545 

658-4270 

(617) 727-3480x21131 

658-2030 

(617) 951-2300 

658-3311 

658-3531 

694-2040 

658-4711 

658-4531 



* Replaced Roger Lessard, January 19, 2009 
** Replaced Gregory Erickson, January 13, 2009 



-167- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates - 2""* & 4'*' Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
as the town's chief elected officials. The Board is responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the 
Board of Appeals, the Town Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible 
for issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer licenses and licenses to 
operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve on a part-time basis. 

Phone 658-3311 

Michael J. Newhouse, Chairman 
Louis Cimaglia, IV 
Charles, R. Fiore, Jr. 
Raymond N. Lepore 
Michael V. McCoy 

Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the town. He supervises and directs the 
administration of all departments, boards and commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town 
Moderator, Finance Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of staff and members of 
certain boards and commissions; attendance at all regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of 
Selectmen to advise and recommend specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the town; 
representing the town in all litigation to which the town is a party; acting as the Chief Fiscal Officer 
of the town; preparation and administration of a comprehensive annual budget and directing the 
procurement of all goods and services on behalf of the town. 

Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrev M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the town's health, workmens' compensation, general 
liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; developing the town's recycling program and insuring 
that the town meets the procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant Town 
Manager serves as staff director to the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; assists with the preparation 
of the annual budget and provides general assistance to the Town Manager in other areas of 
municipal administration. 

Town Clerk - Sharon A. George - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping of records and 
documents, the issuance of licenses and the administration of elections. In terms of the town records 
the Clerk records proceedings of all town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all 
vital statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning decisions, etc. The Clerk's 
office also issues marriage licenses, fish and game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The clerk acts as 
supervisor of all elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 




-168- 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 



Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 694-2029 

The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve town funds. The 
department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all bills owed by the town. The 
Accountant maintains the complete official financial records of the town and prepares other financial 
records and reports as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation of the annual 
budget. 

Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Movnihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property taxes necessary to meet 
appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated equitably on the basis of the property owned by 
each taxpayer. The assessors are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal 
property within the town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, except for property 
qualifying for preferential assessments such as forest, agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates 
depend on three factors: (1) the valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or amount to be raised 
from property taxation and (3) property classification. 

Treasurer/Collector - Pamela L. MacKenzie - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the biUing and collection of monies due the town including 
property and motor vehicle excise taxes and charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This 
department is responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Treasurer/Collector monitors the 
town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The department serves as 
custodian of all town funds. All municipal bank accounts are controlled by this office. The tax title 
and foreclosure proceedings for non-payment of taxes are handled by the Treasurer/Collector. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Carole S. Hamilton - 658-8238 

The major responsibihties of the Planning Department are to: undertake studies of land use, 
economic development, housing, transportation and other matters related to community 
development; compile and maintain maps, statistics and records related to land use and 
development; review individual proposals for development and for compUance with the subdivision 
regulations and zoning by-law; and prepare apphcations and administer grants related to planning 
and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and enforcement of the 
Wetlands Protection Act - Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 131, Section 40. The Act is 
intended to protect seven public interest issues related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage 
prevention, protection of public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, 
prevention of pollution, protection of fisheries and protection of land containing shellfish. Some of 
the department's responsibilities include reviewing and inspecting development projects to insure 
their comphance with the town and State wetlands statutes. In addition, the department manages 
several pieces of property throughout town which have been placed into the town's custody as 
conservation land. 

Building Inspector - John T. Spaulding - 658-4531 

The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the town's Zoning By-law, the State Uniform 
Building Code and certain other State codes. This department provides assistance to the Zoning 
Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, contractors and individual property owners in preparing 
zoning cases, plans and permit apphcations. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, gas 
fitting and wiring inspections. 



-169- 



Director of Public Health - Shelly M. Newhouse - 658-4298 



The department provides two primary types of service. Inspectional services include restaurant, 
retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and schools, all mobile food trucks, ice cream 
trucks and caterers. In addition, the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic 
systems, septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizen complaints 
regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution and hazardous waste spills. The department 
pro\ndes public nursing services. This includes an annual rabies clinic for dogs and immunization 
for influenza, pneumonia, polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse provides blood pressure 
and cholesterol screenings to town residents. In addition, the nurse provides home health care visits 
to elderly residents of the town. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Fire Chief - Edward G. Bradbury - 658-3346 -- Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention and extinguishing of 
fires. Members of the department make regular fire safety inspections of nursing homes, places of 
public assembly and schools. All outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be 
obtained from the Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner installations, 
the storage of flammable liquids such as gasoUne and the purchase, storage and/or use of explosives 
such as dynamite, rockets and gun powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical 
services to residents of Wilmington. Fire fighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services and urgent care 
transport. 

Police Chief - Michael R. Begonis - 658-5071 - Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the protection of people and 
property through enforcement of criminal laws and traffic regulations. The department also enforces 
certain local by-laws and provides public education such as the DARE program. Animal Control 
services are provided through this department. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Superintendent - Donald N. Onusseit - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, cemeteries, water, sewers, 
refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is responsible for the care and maintenance of the 
roads, sidewalks, parking areas and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town 
departments, boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage problems, 
review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway construction. The Parks & 
Grounds Division is responsible for the maintenance of the town's commons, parks and recreation 
areas. The Tree Division is responsible for the town's public shade and ornamental trees and 
maintenance of the trees on the Town Common. The Public Works Department is also responsible 
for the operation of the town's water supply, distribution, treatment systems, septic pumping 
stations, the sanitary sewer collection systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities 
are assumed by the Water & Sewer Department. The department operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal Environmental Agency (EPA). 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program for many household 
items, maintains a composting center for grass and leaf disposal and oversees a contract for 
residential sohd waste collection. 



-170- 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



Superintendent - George W. Hooper. II - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 square feet of building 
space. The department provides custodial services for all school buildings and most of the general 
government buildings. In addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains 
aU of the town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete set-up at all town 
elections and the annual and special town meetings. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Elderly Services Director - Theresa Marciello - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an individual and group 
basis. Examples of the types of programs include health information, educational classes, meals on 
wheels, recreational activities, housing assistance, transportation and counseling. Additional 
services included assistance with social security and Medicaid concerns. 

Librarv Director - Christina A. Stewart - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The library seeks to provide 
basic educational, informational and recreational hbrary services. Staff provides reference and 
reader services to adults and children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information 
available in books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library technology to 
provide the means for informational access and retrieval. The library is a member of the Merrimack 
Valley Library Consortium, a thirty-five member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. 
This membership allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-nine 
member towns. 

Recreation Director - Deborah Cipriani - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for children and adults. 
Some of the programs offered through this department include a summer swimming program for 
children, volleyball for adults, the Tiny Tots program, summer recreation program for children, 
ladies fitness, day trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at Halloween and 
a number of other programs. In addition, the Recreation Department offers resources for travel such 
as discounts to Walt Disney World. 

Veterans' Agent - Louis Cimaglia. IV - 694-2040 

The Veterans' Agent administers a State public assistance program for veterans and their 
dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a large part by the Commonwealth, is 
rendered in the form of cash grants to cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The 
Veterans' Agent also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other programs administered by 
the United States Veterans Administration. 



-171- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 
Meeting Dates & Times 



Board. Committee, Comjnission 
APPEALS. BOARD OF 
ARTS. COUNCIL FOR THE 
ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 
CABLE TV ADVISORY TASK FORCE 
CARTER LECTURE FUND 
CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
COMMUNm^ DE\^LOPMENT 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM 
ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
HEALTH, BOARD OF 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 
HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 
LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
MASTER PLAN COMMITTEE 
OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 
PERMANENT BUILDING COMM. 
PLANNING BOARD 
RECREATION COMMISSION 
REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 
REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
SELECTMEN. BOARD OF 
WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 



Date 


Room 


Building 


Time 


2nd Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


jST Wednesday 




Arts Center 


7:00 p.m. 


2ND Thursday 


2 


Town Hall 


9:00 a.m. 


As Needed 


CONF 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


As Needed 








As Needed 








Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


9:30 a.m. 


1ST & 3RD Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


As Needed 








Thursday 




Sr. Center 


1:30 p.m. 


2ND Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


1ST & 3RD Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


5:30 p.m. 


2ND Monday 




Harnden Tavern or 
West Schoolhouse 


7:30 p.m. 


1ST Thursday 




Deming Way 


10:00 a.m. 


2ND Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


6:00 p.m. 


3RD Tuesday 




Library 


7:00 p.m. 


To Be Determined 


9 


Town Hall 




4th Wednesday 


CONF 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


As Needed 




Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


1ST & 3RD Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:30 p.m. 


1ST Thursday 


8 


Town Hall 


5:00 p.m. 


Monthly 




Shaw. Tech. 


7:30 p.m. 


2ND Monday 


12 


Town Hall 


12:00p.m. 


2ND & 4TH Wednesday 


LIB 


High School 


7:00 p.m. 


2ND & 4TH Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 p.m. 


3RD Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


5:00 p.m. 



-172- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Acorn Drive 
Adams Street 
Adelaide Street 
Agostino Drive 
Agostino Drive 
Aldrich Road 
Allgrove Lane 
Allgrove Lane 
Allenhurst Way 
Allen Park Drive 
Amherst Road 
Andover Street 
Andover Street 
Andrew Street 
Anthony Avenue 
Apache Way 
Apollo Drive 
Appletree Lane 
Arlene Avenue 
Ashwood Avenue 
Aspen Drive 
Auburn Avenue 
Avon Street 
Ayotte Street 



from Oakridge Circle thru cul-de-sac 385 1998 

from Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 2,915 1908 

from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 666 1976 

from Gandalf Way 999 1979 

from Agostino Drive to end of cul-de-sac 580 1996 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 6,740 1894 

from Woburn Street 470 1993 

from Allgrove Lane to dead-end 430 1996 

from Woburn Street 1,161 1994 

from Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 2,319 1971 1984 

from Shawsheen Ave. to end of cul-de-sac 1,500 1996 

from Salem Street 180 1894 

from Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 11,300 1894 1970 

from Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 435 1985 

from Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 300 1966 

from Aldrich Road thru cul-de-sac 1,675 1998 

from Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 300 1971 

from Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 994 1990 

from Salem Street to Ella Avenue 3,754 1966 1978 

from Andover Street thru cul-de-sac 2,800 1998 

from Russell Road thru cul-de-sac 320 1999 

from Shawsheen Avenue 755 1945 

from Avery Street thru cul-de-sac 320 1999 

from Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 240 1947 



Bailey Road 
Bailey Road 
Baker Street 
Baker Street 
Baland Road 
Ballardvale St. 
Ballardvale St. 
Bancroft Street 
Barbara Avenue 
Beacon Street 
Beech Street 
Beeching Avenue 
Belmont Avenue 
Benson Road 
Biggar Avenue 
Birch Road 
Birchwood Road 
Birchwood Road 
Blanchard Road 
Blueberry Lane 
Boutwell Street 
Brand Avenue 
Brand Avenue 
Brattle Street 
Brentwood Avenue 
Bridge Lane 
Bridge Lane 



from Apache Way northeasterly to Bailey Rd. 165 

from Aldrich Rd. southeasterly to Bailey Rd. 538 

from Brand Avenue to beyond Philhps Ave. 684 

from Existing Baker Street 135 

from Ballardvale Street 540 

from Salem Street to Route 125 965 

from Route 125 to Andover Line 12,000 

from Liberty Street 400 

from Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 850 

from Church Street to Belmont Avenue 970 

from Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 1,005 

from Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 440 

from Columbia Street to State Street 980 

from Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 616 

from Salem Street to Ring Avenue 1,282 

from Birch Rd. easterly thru cul-de-sac 345 

from Shady Lane Drive 1,197 

from Judith Road 400 

from Kendall Road 625 

from Ashwood Avenue thru cul-de-sac 1,600 

from Burhngton Avenue to Aldrich Road 4, 144 

from Bridge Lane 510 

from Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 950 

from Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 1,066 

from Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 1,017 

from Shawsheen Avenue 455 

from Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 754 



1998 
1999 
1945 
2001 
1972 
1894 

1894 1985 

1952 

1966 

1915 

1947 

1959 

1933 

1971 

1975 

1999 

1952 

1953 

1989 

1998 

1894 1960 1971 

1933 1943 

1933 1943 

1945 

1938 

1894 

1894 



-173- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


1954 


Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 


Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 


Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 


Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 


Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 


Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


1939 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


1960 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1961 


Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Ave to beyond Norfolk Ave. 


1,411 


1957 


Castle Drive 


from 


Burlington Ave left to Burlington Ave 


1,325 


1997 


Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 


Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 


Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


1963 


Central Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 


Chandler Road 


from 


Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 


Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 


859 


1971 


Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 


Cherokee Lane 


from 


Woburn St easterly thru cul-de-sac 


812 


1999 


Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 


Chisholm Way 


from 


Mink Run to end of cul-de-sac 


427 


2008 


Church Street 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4,285 


1894 


Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


Clorinda Road 


from 


Agostino Drive 


887 


1979 


Colonial Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue thru cul-de-sac 


375 


1997 


Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 


Columbia Street 


from 


Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1,150 


1908 


Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 


Congress Street 


from 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 


Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


813 


1946 


Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 


Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 


Cornell Place 


from 


Fordham Road 


747 


1982 


Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 


Cottonwood Circle 


from 


Blueberry Lane thru cul-de-sac 


280 


1998 


Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 


Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 


Crystal Road 


from 


Woburn Street to end of cul-de-sac 


895 


1996 


Cunningham St. 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


2,447 


1944 


Cushing Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


990 


1993 


Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 



1946 



Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1,760 


1964 


Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 


Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 


Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1,794 


1958 


Dexter Street 


from 


Mam Street 


480 


1979 


Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 


Dogwood Lane 


from 


Blueberry Lane to Ashwood Avenue 


550 


1997 


Dorche.ster Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 


Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 



-174- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Douglas Avenue from Palmer Way 1,017 1989 

Draper Drive from Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 1,560 1959 1971 

Drury Lane from Glen Road to School Street 633 1963 

Dublin Avenue from Main Street 500 1951 

Dunton Road from Nassau Avenue 649 1956 

Eames Street from Main Street to Woburn Street 3,200 1894 

EarlesRow from Route 62 820 1994 

Edward Road from Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 450 1947 

Elizabeth Drive from Butters Row thru cul-de-sac 1,348 1999 

Ella Avenue from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 1,043 1978 

ElwoodRoad from Forest Street 642 1968 

Emerson Street from Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 590 1951 

Emerald Avenue from Andover St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 400 2000 

Englewood Drive from Kenwood Drive 455 1971 

Evans Drive from Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 2,071 1971 

Everett Avenue from Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham Street 480 1979 

Fairfield Road from Main Street 1,299 1946 

Fairmeadow Road from Nichols Street to Nichols Street 2,328 1958 

Fairmont Avenue from Molloy Road 952 1971 

Fairview Avenue from State Street 648 1933 

Faneuil Drive from Mass. Avenue to beyond Harvard Avenue 790 1950 

Faulkner Avenue from Glen Road to Jacobs Street 1,946 1944 1953 

Faulkner Avenue from Faulkner Ave northeasterly to dead end 125 1999 

Fay Street from Glen Road to Garden Avenue 714 1938 1945 

Federal Street from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 5,740 1894 

Fenway Street from Rollins Rd to end of cul-de-sac 375 2004 

Ferguson Road from Shawsheen Avenue 1,073 1967 

Fernbanks Road from Mill Road to end of cul-de-sac 550 1996 

Flagstaff Road from Nichols Street 587 1989 

Fletcher Lane from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 792 1977 

Floradale Avenue from Burlington Avenue 627 1970 

Flynn Way from Federal Street to end of cul-de-sac 680 1996 

Foley Farm Road from Kilmarnock Street to end of cul-de-sac 363 2004 

Fordham Road from North Reading Line 3,714 1971 

Forest Street from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 4,100 1894 1976 

Fox Run Drive from High Street 975 1989 

Franklin Avenue from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 739 1978 

Frederick Drive from Salem Street 1,070 1966 

Freeport Drive from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 2,086 1979 

Gandalf Way from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 549 1979 

Gatehouse Lane from Towpath Road 380 1994 

Gearty Street from Ring Avenue 627 1989 

Glen Road from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 6,870 1894 

Glendale Circle from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 1,304 1952 

Glenview Road from Suncrest Avenue 365 1959 

Gloria Way from Broad Street 770 1989 

Gowing Road from Park Street to Marcus Road 941 1956 

Grace Drive from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 2,514 1966 

Grand Avenue from Corey Avenue 815 1952 

Grant Street from Federal Street 780 1943 

Great Neck Drive from Woburn Street 536 1989 

Grove Avenue from Main Street to Lake Street 4,147 1910 



-175- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Grow Street 


from 


Reading Line 


120 


1957 


Gunderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1,506 


1959 


Hainlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 


540 


1962 


Hanover Street 


from 


Atlantic Avenue 


574 


1988 


Hanson Road 


from 


Woodland Road 


838 


1969 


Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 


428 


1951 


Harnden Street 


from 


Main Street to Glen Road 


600 


1895 


Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


1,312 


1971 


Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 


Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 


Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


3,270 


1951 


Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


230 


1956 


Heather Drive 


from 


Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 


1,286 


1979 


Henry L. Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


651 


1993 


High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3,585 


1894 


Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burhngton Line 


2,230 


1914 


Hilltop Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1959 


Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1,560 


1945 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,051 


1894 


Houghton Road 


from 


Kendall Street to Andrew Street 


1,702 


1985 


Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4,430 


1974 


Isabella Way 


from 


West Street 


385 


2001 


Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,398 


1938 


Jere Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1,248 


1968 


Jewel Drive 


from 


Eames Street 


1,303 


1985 


Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


1940 


Jonspin Road 


from 


Andover Street 


3,800 


1993 


Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


400 


1953 



1966 



1953 1959 



1951 
1972 



1952 
1975 



1949 1951 



Kajin Way 
Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
King Street Ext. 
Kirk Street 



from Woburn Street 

from Chandler Road 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 

from Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 

from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 

from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 

from Glen Road to Broad Street 

from Glen Road 

from Main Street 



455 
923 
1,420 
1,725 
693 
1,840 
2,400 
487 
575 



1989 
1957 
1945 
1970 
1958 
1894 
1940 
1979 
1951 



1971 



1945 



Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 


Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 


Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 


Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 


Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 


Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 


Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham St. to Morningside Dr. 


714 


1974 


Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 


Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 


Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,050 


1951 


Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 


Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 



-176- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Lorin Drive 


from Swain Road 


560 


1992 


Loumac Road 


from Drury Lane 


510 


1963 


Lowell Street 


from Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 


1894 


Lowell St. Park 


from Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


Lucaya Circle 


from Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1979 


Mackey Road 


from Federal Street 


250 


1943 


Magazine Road 


from Wisser Street 


320 


1973 


Magazine Street 


from Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 


Main Street 


from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 


Manning Street 


from Aldrich Road to Moore Street 


970 


2002 


Marcia Road 


from North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2,806 


1962 


Marcus Road 


from Gowing Road 


2,315 


1958 


Marie Drive 


from Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


Marion Street 


from Burhngton Ave. to beyond Clifton St. 


1,876 


1945 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 


1995 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. southeasterly to Marion St. 


1,133 


2000 


Marion Street 


from Marion St. southerly an additional 


950 


2001 


Marjorie Road 


from Main Street 


1,392 


1951 


Massachusetts Ave. from Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 


McDonald Road 


from Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 


Meadow Lane 


from Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 


Meadow Lane 


from Meadow Lane thru cul-de-sac 


115 


1997 


Melody Lane 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 


Meadow Brook Rd. 


from Factory Rd. southeasterly 


204 


2001 


Middlesex Avenue 


from Main Street to Salem Street 


12,140 


1894 


Miles Street 


from Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Miller Road 


from Glen Road 


Duo 




Molloy Road 


from Lowell Street 


988 


2001 


Moore Street 


from Shawsheen Ave to beyond Wedgewood Ave 


1,528 


1967 


Moore Street 


from Existing Moore Street 


630 


2001 


Morgan Road 


from Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 


Morningside Drive 


from Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


Morse Avenue 


from Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 


Mystic Avenue 


from Middlesex Avenue 


1,298 


1908 


Nassau Avenue 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 


Nathan Road 


from Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 


Navajo Drive 


from Chestnut Street thru cul-de-sac 


585 


2006 


Nelson Way 


from High Street thru cul-de-sac 






Nichols Street 


from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 


Nickerson Avenue 


from West Street 


953 


1947 


Norfolk Avenue 


from Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 


North Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 


N. Washington Ave. 


from Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 


Nottingham Drive 


from Stonehedge Drive thru cul-de-sac 


480 


1997 


Nunn Road 


from Kelley Road 


214 


1965 


Oak Street 


from Salem Street 


355 


1951 


Oakdale Road 


from Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 


Oakridge Circle 


from Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 


Oakwood Road 


from Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 


Olson Street 


from Church Street 


122 


1957 


Oxbow Drive 


from Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 



1978 
1957 



1958 



-177- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Palnior \\ ay 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1 4 on 


1989 


t ,11 K oil eel 


from 


Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 


4,i<5U 


lovo 


Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 




1919 


Patches Pond Lane 


from 


Chestnut Street to a dead end 


1 1 Q C 


1990 


Patricia Circle 


from 


ueii urive 


o\)o 


1 o 


Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


ion 
7ZU 


iy4o 


Philhps Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1 Kin 
i,0l9 


1946 


Pilcher Drive 


from 


the end of Gearty Street 


Atf\ 

410 


iyo9 


ruling Koaa 


from 


Hathaway Road 


»04 


lyoy 


Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


ooV 


iy45 


Pineridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1,364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Cir. 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1 lU 


iyo4 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


rJoutweii otreet 


oZb 


ly / / 


Presidential Dr. 


from 


Presidential Drive thru cul-de-sac 


IK30 


1 QQQ 


X rogreoo v> ay 


from 


inuubLridi way 


DOU 


iy / 


t^uail Kun 


irom 


Woburn otreet 


OUU 


lyyz 


xvauciiii itoau 


irom 


South otreet to rJenson Koad 


oDu 


1 Q71 

iy / L 


Railroad Avenue 


from 


oiarK oireeu 


DOU 


lyuy 


Reading Avenue 


from 


waKwoou. rvoau. 


91 K 


1 Q7Q 

it/ / y 


Reading Avenue 


from 


Faulkner Ave northwesterly to dead-end 


1 cn 


1 QQ7 

iyy / 


Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 




iy / u 


rteea otreet 


from 


Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave. 


i,uyu 


1 Q7 1 

iy / i 


Research Drive 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


1 Q 1 T 

i,oi / 


1 QQQ 


Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


i,c5UU 


1 Q7Q 

iy /o 


Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 


River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 


AK.'i 
40O 


iyb^ 


Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 


1 1 

i,ODi 


1 QC7 

lyo / 


rtoiiins xvoaa 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 




iyoi 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1 Qftn 


1 QAd 

iy'iD 


Koute 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


o,o4o 


iyott 


rtoyai otreet 


from 


Salem Street 




lyoi 


Sachem Circle 


from 


Elizabeth Drive thru cul-de-sac 




zuuo 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 


Ojoyo 


1 QQA 


Salem Street 


from 


No. Reading Line to beyond Woburn St. 


b,4 / 


1 QQ/t 

ioy4 


Sarafina's Way 


from 


Hopkins St. thru cul-de-sac 


40U 


lyyo 


Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


lOO 


1 Q7/1 

ly ( 4 


School Street 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 


1 1 QQ 

i, Lou 


1 Q1 

iyio 


Seneca Lane 


from 


Tacoma Drive to Tacoma Drive 


i,Ubo 


onno 
zuuz 


O T 

beneca Lane 


from 


Tacoma Drive to end of cul-de-sac 


5o0 


ZUU4 


Senpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


Sequoia Drive 


from 


Cherokee Lane to end of cul-de-sac 


1,152 


2008 


Serenoa Lane 


from 


Woburn St. westerly thru cul-de-sac 


600 


1999 


Sewell Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


Shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richmond St. to Billerica Ln. 


11,845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 



-178- 




STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Sheridan Road 


from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


Silver Lake Ave. 


from Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


Somerset Place 


from Mystic Avenue easterly thru cul-de-sac 


878 


2000 


Sparhawk Drive 


from Park Street to Heather Drive 


361 


1979 


Sprucewood Road 


from Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 


Stonehedge Drive 


from Castle Dr. northerly thru cul-de-sac 


1,400 


1997 


Strout Avenue 


from Lowell Street 


908 


1955 


Suncrest Avenue 


from West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 


Swain Road 


from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


Taft Road 


from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 


Taplin Avenue 


from Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Taplin Avenue 


from Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Temple Street 


from Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Tomahawk Drive 


from Aldrich Road 


575 


1989 


Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive to a dead end 


463 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 


914 


1990 


Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive 


870 


1993 


Towpath Drive 


from Towpath Drive to Butters Row 


886 


1996 


Tracy Circle 


from Woburn Street 


675 


1992 


Truman Road 


from Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 


Unnamed Street 


from Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Valyn Lane 


from Salem Street 


608 


1989 


Veranda Avenue 


from Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 


Wakefield Avenue 


from Buckingham St. easterly to dead end 


355 


1999 


Walker Street 


from Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from Moore Street 


476 


1967 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from Wedgewood Ave. southeast thru cul-de-sac 


75 


1997 


West Street 


from Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 



-179- 



) 



* * For Your Information * * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 

Appeals Board 
Arts Center 
Assessor 

Building Inspector 

Cemetery Department 

Collector of Taxes 

Elderly Services 

Engineer 

Fire Department 

Fire Prevention 
Harnden Tavern Museum 
Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 



Public Buildings Department 
Public Works Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Selectmen, Board of 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veterans' Agent 
Water & Sewer 



(Business Phone) 
(EMERGENCY) 



Telephone Number 

694-2029 

658-5071 (Complaints) 
658-7845 (Missing/Adoption) 
658-4531 

657- 3887 

658- 3675 
658-4531 
658-3901 
658-3531 

657- 7595 

658- 4499 
658-3346 

9-1-1 
694-2006 
658-5475 
658-4298 
658-8531 
658-2967 

657- 4625 

658- 4298 
658-8238 
658-4531 
658-5071 

9-1-1 

657- 8368 

658- 3017 
658-4481 
658-4270 
694-6000 
658-3311 
658-2030 
658-3311 
694-1417 
658-3531 
658-2809 
694-2040 
658-4711 

658-3116 (Billing) 



(TDD) 



(EMERGENCY) 

(TDD) 



(TDD) 



Food Pantry 
Shawsheen Tech 
WCTV 
Comcast 
Keyspan 

Mosquito Control 
Reading Light Dept. 
Transitional Services 
Verizon 



658 
667 
657 
888 - 633 
800- 548 
508- 393 
781 - 944 
800 - 249 
888 - 438 



7425 
2111 
4066 
4266 
8000 
3055 
1340 
2007 
3467 



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